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League Type
Points
Scoring
DEN (C)
G
80
Min
35.1
FPTS
2,842.0
REB
874.0
AST
672.0
STL
102.0
BLK
53.0
TO
272.0
FGM
820.0
FGA
1,484.0
FTM
390.0
FTA
457.0
The 2020-21 MVP and top fantasy player, Jokic may actually be in position to improve his numbers in 2021-22. Jamal Murray is expected to be out for the majority of the season with a torn ACL, which should only lead to more touches for Jokic. With Murray off the court last season, Jokic posted 29.8 points, 11.2 rebounds, 9.2 assists and 1.1 steals per 36 minutes. Michael Porter should continue improving, and Aaron Gordon will have more time to develop team chemistry, but there's only so much the Nuggets' offense will be able to accomplish when Jokic isn't making things happen. It's possible increased defensive pressure will cause Jokic to be less efficient -- he shot 57/39/87 last season -- but it's unlikely a drastic dip occurs. There are other options for fantasy managers to select with the No. 1 pick in their drafts, but none are safer than Jokic, and he plays a position of scarcity. He's an especially good No. 1 pick for managers in two-center leagues. The only flaw in his fantasy profile is a lack of blocks, but those can be picked up late in any fantasy draft. No matter your league format, the case to take Jokic first overall is obvious, and fantasy managers drafting second or third overall should be elated if he manages to fall that far.
The 2020-21 MVP and top fantasy player, Jokic may actually be in position to improve his numbers in 2021-22. Jamal Murray is expected to be out for the majority of the season with a torn ACL, which should only lead to more touches for Jokic. With Murray off the court last season, Jokic posted 29.8 points, 11.2 rebounds, 9.2 assists and 1.1 steals per 36 minutes. Michael Porter should continue improving, and Aaron Gordon will have more time to develop team chemistry, but there's only so much the Nuggets' offense will be able to accomplish when Jokic isn't making things happen. It's possible increased defensive pressure will cause Jokic to be less efficient -- he shot 57/39/87 last season -- but it's unlikely a drastic dip occurs. There are other options for fantasy managers to select with the No. 1 pick in their drafts, but none are safer than Jokic, and he plays a position of scarcity. He's an especially good No. 1 pick for managers in two-center leagues. The only flaw in his fantasy profile is a lack of blocks, but those can be picked up late in any fantasy draft. No matter your league format, the case to take Jokic first overall is obvious, and fantasy managers drafting second or third overall should be elated if he manages to fall that far.
G
74
Min
32.7
FPTS
2,567.0
REB
921.0
AST
447.0
STL
77.0
BLK
95.0
TO
266.0
FGM
778.0
FGA
1,381.0
FTM
485.0
FTA
712.0
While Antetokounmpo wasn't handed a third straight MVP in 2020-21, he was able to carry the Bucks to an NBA Championship. He still was named to the All-NBA First Team, All-Defensive First Team and finished fourth in MVP voting. During the regular season, he averaged 28.1 points, 11.0 rebounds, 5.9 assists and 2.4 combined steals-plus-blocks. He also finished with seven triple-doubles (sixth-most in the NBA). Heading into 2021-22, the Greek Freak's role shouldn't change much, if at all. That said, fantasy managers in position to potentially draft Antetokounmpo should keep in mind his awful free-throw shooting. Over the past three seasons, he's taking 9.7 freebies per game and hitting them at just a 68.4 percent clip. Considering the volume he's shooting free throws at, it's extremely damaging to his fantasy value. Notably, it's dragged him outside of the top-10 in per-game value in the past two seasons. Despite his otherwise gaudy numbers, he ranked just 11th last year. He's still worth an obvious first-round selection. If he makes even marginal improvement in his free-throw efficiency, he could make it back inside the top 5.
While Antetokounmpo wasn't handed a third straight MVP in 2020-21, he was able to carry the Bucks to an NBA Championship. He still was named to the All-NBA First Team, All-Defensive First Team and finished fourth in MVP voting. During the regular season, he averaged 28.1 points, 11.0 rebounds, 5.9 assists and 2.4 combined steals-plus-blocks. He also finished with seven triple-doubles (sixth-most in the NBA). Heading into 2021-22, the Greek Freak's role shouldn't change much, if at all. That said, fantasy managers in position to potentially draft Antetokounmpo should keep in mind his awful free-throw shooting. Over the past three seasons, he's taking 9.7 freebies per game and hitting them at just a 68.4 percent clip. Considering the volume he's shooting free throws at, it's extremely damaging to his fantasy value. Notably, it's dragged him outside of the top-10 in per-game value in the past two seasons. Despite his otherwise gaudy numbers, he ranked just 11th last year. He's still worth an obvious first-round selection. If he makes even marginal improvement in his free-throw efficiency, he could make it back inside the top 5.
DAL (G)
G
75
Min
34.9
FPTS
2,298.0
REB
654.0
AST
688.0
STL
79.0
BLK
18.0
TO
359.0
FGM
760.0
FGA
1,602.0
FTM
453.0
FTA
614.0
Doncic signed a five-year, $207 million extension with the Mavericks in the offseason, coming off a 2020-21 campaign in which he averaged 27.7 points, 8.6 assists, 8.0 rebounds and 1.0 steals in 34.3 minutes. He also reached career-highs in field-goal percentage (47.9) and three-point percentage (35.0). That resulted in Doncic ranking 14th in fantasy production on a per-game basis -- a marginal dip from his 2019-20 rank of 10th. Most impressively was the 22-year-old stepping his game up in the playoffs against the Clippers and the elite wing defense of Kawhi Leonard and Paul George. In the seven-game, first-round series, Doncic averaged 35.7 points on 49/41/53 shooting, 10.3 assists, 7.9 rebounds and 1.3 steals in 40.2 minutes. Doncic is the betting favorite for MVP heading into 2021-22, demonstrating how much of a phenom he already is. His usage should stay stagnant, as the Mavericks didn't make any impactful additions in terms of playmakers during the offseason, and arguably the only meaningful addition they made at all was Reggie Bullock -- a much-needed 3-and-D wing. Putting aside turnovers for the purposes of most fantasy leagues, the only significant hole to poke in Doncic's game is his poor free-throw percentage. He's a 73.5 percent career shooter in the NBA and was an 80.1 percent career shooter in Europe, so there's certainly room for improvement. Even if he doesn't make strides there, Doncic is still worth a first-round selection in almost all fantasy leagues due to his pure upside as a nightly 30-10-10 threat. He also may be the most valuable player in keeper/dynasty fantasy formats.
Doncic signed a five-year, $207 million extension with the Mavericks in the offseason, coming off a 2020-21 campaign in which he averaged 27.7 points, 8.6 assists, 8.0 rebounds and 1.0 steals in 34.3 minutes. He also reached career-highs in field-goal percentage (47.9) and three-point percentage (35.0). That resulted in Doncic ranking 14th in fantasy production on a per-game basis -- a marginal dip from his 2019-20 rank of 10th. Most impressively was the 22-year-old stepping his game up in the playoffs against the Clippers and the elite wing defense of Kawhi Leonard and Paul George. In the seven-game, first-round series, Doncic averaged 35.7 points on 49/41/53 shooting, 10.3 assists, 7.9 rebounds and 1.3 steals in 40.2 minutes. Doncic is the betting favorite for MVP heading into 2021-22, demonstrating how much of a phenom he already is. His usage should stay stagnant, as the Mavericks didn't make any impactful additions in terms of playmakers during the offseason, and arguably the only meaningful addition they made at all was Reggie Bullock -- a much-needed 3-and-D wing. Putting aside turnovers for the purposes of most fantasy leagues, the only significant hole to poke in Doncic's game is his poor free-throw percentage. He's a 73.5 percent career shooter in the NBA and was an 80.1 percent career shooter in Europe, so there's certainly room for improvement. Even if he doesn't make strides there, Doncic is still worth a first-round selection in almost all fantasy leagues due to his pure upside as a nightly 30-10-10 threat. He also may be the most valuable player in keeper/dynasty fantasy formats.
BRO (G)
G
74
Min
36.7
FPTS
2,236.0
REB
570.0
AST
769.0
STL
95.0
BLK
53.0
TO
310.0
FGM
516.0
FGA
1,100.0
FTM
474.0
FTA
546.0
Despite the mid-season change of scenery to a Brooklyn team with Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving also on it, Harden finished the 2020-21 season as the third-best fantasy player on a per-game basis. There will still be fantasy managers willing to take him No. 1 this season, but there's also cause for hesitation. The Nets' Big 3 spent little time on the court together due to injuries, so Harden's numbers were artificially boosted by it often being a Big 2, or just himself. What will happen if Irving and Durant manage to stay healthy for most of the season? For some insight, we can look at Harden's numbers with that pair on the court. In the 201 minutes the Big 3 shared on the court (regular season and playoffs), Harden posted a shockingly-low 18.3 percent usage rate and averaged only 16.1 points, 11.4 assists, 7.3 rebounds and 1.3 steals per 36 minutes. While the three won't often all be on the court at the same time, there's reason for fantasy managers to be concerned that we'll no longer be getting the gaudy numbers from Harden that we've been used to over the past half-decade. He'll always be a threat for 30-and-10, but he's no longer in a situation where that's needed from him on a game-to-game basis.
Despite the mid-season change of scenery to a Brooklyn team with Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving also on it, Harden finished the 2020-21 season as the third-best fantasy player on a per-game basis. There will still be fantasy managers willing to take him No. 1 this season, but there's also cause for hesitation. The Nets' Big 3 spent little time on the court together due to injuries, so Harden's numbers were artificially boosted by it often being a Big 2, or just himself. What will happen if Irving and Durant manage to stay healthy for most of the season? For some insight, we can look at Harden's numbers with that pair on the court. In the 201 minutes the Big 3 shared on the court (regular season and playoffs), Harden posted a shockingly-low 18.3 percent usage rate and averaged only 16.1 points, 11.4 assists, 7.3 rebounds and 1.3 steals per 36 minutes. While the three won't often all be on the court at the same time, there's reason for fantasy managers to be concerned that we'll no longer be getting the gaudy numbers from Harden that we've been used to over the past half-decade. He'll always be a threat for 30-and-10, but he's no longer in a situation where that's needed from him on a game-to-game basis.
NOR (F)
G
73
Min
34.1
FPTS
2,188.0
REB
572.0
AST
321.0
STL
70.0
BLK
58.0
TO
220.0
FGM
817.0
FGA
1,364.0
FTM
470.0
FTA
663.0
After a brief-but-impressive rookie campaign, Williamson improved enough as a sophomore to make his first All-Star team. The 2019 No. 1 overall pick averaged 27.0 points on an absurd 61.1 percent shooting while tallying 7.2 rebounds and 3.7 assists in 33.2 minutes. That resulted in him ranking 50th in fantasy on a per-game basis. There are still clear holes in Williamson's game -- including his poor free-throw shooting (69.8 percent on 8.7 attempts), subpar defense (0.9 steals and 0.6 blocks) and a lack of a three-point shot (0.2 makes on 29.4 percent) -- but he's so dominant as a scorer that those weaknesses aren't holding him down much. Maybe the biggest indicator of how unstoppable he can be is that he was fouled on 22.5 percent of his shot attempts -- the third-highest number last season of players who saw at least 1,000 minutes and notably above Giannis Antetokounmpo and Joel Embiid. Williamson also improved as the year went on, and his performances began consistently reaching elevated heights in mid-February. For example, in a 25-game stretch from Feb. 12 through April 11, Williamson averaged 29.5 points on 63.3 percent shooting, 7.4 rebounds and 4.4 assists. He also had 21 games with at least 30 points, plus 14 double-doubles. The sky appears to be the limit for Williamson in 2021-22. He'll still be sharing a decent chunk of the offense with Brandon Ingram and new additions Devonte' Graham and Jonas Valanciunas, but the franchise's focus has to be on making sure Williamson is happy in his role. If he can marginally improve, especially as a free-throw shooter and defender, Williamson has clear second-to-third-round upside, which is likely where he'll be drafted.
After a brief-but-impressive rookie campaign, Williamson improved enough as a sophomore to make his first All-Star team. The 2019 No. 1 overall pick averaged 27.0 points on an absurd 61.1 percent shooting while tallying 7.2 rebounds and 3.7 assists in 33.2 minutes. That resulted in him ranking 50th in fantasy on a per-game basis. There are still clear holes in Williamson's game -- including his poor free-throw shooting (69.8 percent on 8.7 attempts), subpar defense (0.9 steals and 0.6 blocks) and a lack of a three-point shot (0.2 makes on 29.4 percent) -- but he's so dominant as a scorer that those weaknesses aren't holding him down much. Maybe the biggest indicator of how unstoppable he can be is that he was fouled on 22.5 percent of his shot attempts -- the third-highest number last season of players who saw at least 1,000 minutes and notably above Giannis Antetokounmpo and Joel Embiid. Williamson also improved as the year went on, and his performances began consistently reaching elevated heights in mid-February. For example, in a 25-game stretch from Feb. 12 through April 11, Williamson averaged 29.5 points on 63.3 percent shooting, 7.4 rebounds and 4.4 assists. He also had 21 games with at least 30 points, plus 14 double-doubles. The sky appears to be the limit for Williamson in 2021-22. He'll still be sharing a decent chunk of the offense with Brandon Ingram and new additions Devonte' Graham and Jonas Valanciunas, but the franchise's focus has to be on making sure Williamson is happy in his role. If he can marginally improve, especially as a free-throw shooter and defender, Williamson has clear second-to-third-round upside, which is likely where he'll be drafted.
MIN (C)
G
73
Min
34.1
FPTS
2,165.0
REB
792.0
AST
289.0
STL
69.0
BLK
96.0
TO
231.0
FGM
635.0
FGA
1,280.0
FTM
389.0
FTA
471.0
Towns appeared in just 50 games last season, mainly due to COVID-19 protocols, but he still put together a great campaign when on the court. He ranked eighth in per-game fantasy production, averaging 24.8 points, 10.6 rebounds, 4.5 assists and 1.9 combined blocks-plus-steals. He also retained his excellent shooting efficiency with splits of 49/38/86, though it was technically his second-worst season from a true-shooting percentage (61.2) standpoint. Heading into 2021-22, Towns will remain the top offensive option for a struggling Timberwolves team that desperately needs every ounce of production he's able to provide. He should at least be able to cede some responsibilities to emerging sophomore Anthony Edwards and D'Angelo Russell, but the team is so devoid of offensive ability outside of that trio that Towns will unquestionably need to still average roughly 25/10/5. Looking through the noise of the Wolves' team struggles and Towns' subpar defense, the reality is that he's one of the best fantasy players in the NBA, and he deserves to be locked in as a first-round pick in every draft.
Towns appeared in just 50 games last season, mainly due to COVID-19 protocols, but he still put together a great campaign when on the court. He ranked eighth in per-game fantasy production, averaging 24.8 points, 10.6 rebounds, 4.5 assists and 1.9 combined blocks-plus-steals. He also retained his excellent shooting efficiency with splits of 49/38/86, though it was technically his second-worst season from a true-shooting percentage (61.2) standpoint. Heading into 2021-22, Towns will remain the top offensive option for a struggling Timberwolves team that desperately needs every ounce of production he's able to provide. He should at least be able to cede some responsibilities to emerging sophomore Anthony Edwards and D'Angelo Russell, but the team is so devoid of offensive ability outside of that trio that Towns will unquestionably need to still average roughly 25/10/5. Looking through the noise of the Wolves' team struggles and Towns' subpar defense, the reality is that he's one of the best fantasy players in the NBA, and he deserves to be locked in as a first-round pick in every draft.
POR (G)
G
77
Min
36.6
FPTS
2,155.0
REB
324.0
AST
587.0
STL
85.0
BLK
25.0
TO
221.0
FGM
707.0
FGA
1,537.0
FTM
527.0
FTA
587.0
Lillard's All-NBA Second Team selection in 2020-21 was his fourth straight season making an All-NBA team, and he also finished seventh in MVP voting. The elite guard averaged 28.8 points, 7.5 assists and 4.2 rebounds in 35.8 minutes. He also hit 4.1 threes per game at 39.1 percent and converted 92.8 percent of his free throws. There's been plenty of buzz that Lillard may want out of Portland, with the Blazers failing to make significant progress in the quest for an NBA title. It seems unlikely the situation will reach a point where Lillard will sit out games, however, so fantasy managers shouldn't be too concerned about a potential trade request. Ultimately, wherever the 31-year-old plays, he's a threat to be one of the best players in the league and put up numbers reflecting that. He's finished inside the top-10 in total fantasy production in each of the past four seasons, and he ranked third last year. While he's probably not worth the No. 1 pick in most fantasy drafts, he's certainly a candidate to get drafted any time after that.
Lillard's All-NBA Second Team selection in 2020-21 was his fourth straight season making an All-NBA team, and he also finished seventh in MVP voting. The elite guard averaged 28.8 points, 7.5 assists and 4.2 rebounds in 35.8 minutes. He also hit 4.1 threes per game at 39.1 percent and converted 92.8 percent of his free throws. There's been plenty of buzz that Lillard may want out of Portland, with the Blazers failing to make significant progress in the quest for an NBA title. It seems unlikely the situation will reach a point where Lillard will sit out games, however, so fantasy managers shouldn't be too concerned about a potential trade request. Ultimately, wherever the 31-year-old plays, he's a threat to be one of the best players in the league and put up numbers reflecting that. He's finished inside the top-10 in total fantasy production in each of the past four seasons, and he ranked third last year. While he's probably not worth the No. 1 pick in most fantasy drafts, he's certainly a candidate to get drafted any time after that.
IND (C)
G
73
Min
35.7
FPTS
2,109.0
REB
905.0
AST
460.0
STL
75.0
BLK
36.0
TO
231.0
FGM
567.0
FGA
1,076.0
FTM
263.0
FTA
357.0
The 2020-21 season marked Sabonis' second straight All-Star appearance, and he managed to improve his numbers nearly across the board. In 36.0 minutes per game, the big man averaged 20.3 points, 12.0 rebounds, 6.7 assists and 1.7 combined steals-plus-blocks. He also shot 53.5 percent from the field while hitting 0.8 threes per game at a passable 32.1 percent -- not bad considering he significantly increased his volume. His 73.2 percent mark from the charity stripe was fine for a big man, as well. Those numbers came together to help Sabonis rank 18th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- a significant jump from his 2019-20 rank of 42nd. At 25 years old, Sabonis still has potential to add to his game. The most obvious steps for him are a better three-point stroke and improved defense, though 1.2 steals per game is a fine number for a power foward/center. The Pacers didn't make any drastic moves during the offseason, so they'll essentially be bringing back the same team. A coaching change occurred, but it's unlikely that will bring about a drastic change in Sabonis' role as the offensive hub. There's a path for Sabonis to remain stagnant or take a small step back if Malcolm Brogdon, Caris LeVert and TJ Warren all stay healthy and are as potent offensively as they've shown to be in the past. However, fantasy managers should feel safe that Sabonis will continue to stuff the stat sheet. Given the situation, he makes for a solid late-second or early-third-round target in most fantasy leagues.
The 2020-21 season marked Sabonis' second straight All-Star appearance, and he managed to improve his numbers nearly across the board. In 36.0 minutes per game, the big man averaged 20.3 points, 12.0 rebounds, 6.7 assists and 1.7 combined steals-plus-blocks. He also shot 53.5 percent from the field while hitting 0.8 threes per game at a passable 32.1 percent -- not bad considering he significantly increased his volume. His 73.2 percent mark from the charity stripe was fine for a big man, as well. Those numbers came together to help Sabonis rank 18th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- a significant jump from his 2019-20 rank of 42nd. At 25 years old, Sabonis still has potential to add to his game. The most obvious steps for him are a better three-point stroke and improved defense, though 1.2 steals per game is a fine number for a power foward/center. The Pacers didn't make any drastic moves during the offseason, so they'll essentially be bringing back the same team. A coaching change occurred, but it's unlikely that will bring about a drastic change in Sabonis' role as the offensive hub. There's a path for Sabonis to remain stagnant or take a small step back if Malcolm Brogdon, Caris LeVert and TJ Warren all stay healthy and are as potent offensively as they've shown to be in the past. However, fantasy managers should feel safe that Sabonis will continue to stuff the stat sheet. Given the situation, he makes for a solid late-second or early-third-round target in most fantasy leagues.
MIA (C)
G
77
Min
33.6
FPTS
2,094.0
REB
761.0
AST
391.0
STL
96.0
BLK
85.0
TO
192.0
FGM
569.0
FGA
1,001.0
FTM
340.0
FTA
435.0
Though Adebayo wasn't able to make the All-Star team last season, he put up better numbers than he did as an All-Star in 2019-20. The emerging center averaged 18.7 points, 9.0 rebounds, 5.4 assists and a combined 2.2 steals-plus-blocks. His impressive defense led to him being voted to the All-Defensive Second Team for a second straight year. He also shot well from both the field (57.0 percent) and the charity stripe (79.9 percent), by big-man standards. Adebayo's production led to him ranking 21st in fantasy on a per-game basis -- a 10-spot jump compared to 2019-20. The 24-year-old figures to keep improving in 2021-22, though the addition of Kyle Lowry will take some scoring and playmaking pressure off of his shoulders. As a result, a slight dip in points and assists wouldn't be surprising, though there could be more available effort to rack up rebounds, steals and blocks. Ultimately, Adebayo is an ascending star on one of the East's top teams who already has a proven track record. He's durable, his floor is high, and he deserves to be selected in the second or third round of most fantasy drafts.
Though Adebayo wasn't able to make the All-Star team last season, he put up better numbers than he did as an All-Star in 2019-20. The emerging center averaged 18.7 points, 9.0 rebounds, 5.4 assists and a combined 2.2 steals-plus-blocks. His impressive defense led to him being voted to the All-Defensive Second Team for a second straight year. He also shot well from both the field (57.0 percent) and the charity stripe (79.9 percent), by big-man standards. Adebayo's production led to him ranking 21st in fantasy on a per-game basis -- a 10-spot jump compared to 2019-20. The 24-year-old figures to keep improving in 2021-22, though the addition of Kyle Lowry will take some scoring and playmaking pressure off of his shoulders. As a result, a slight dip in points and assists wouldn't be surprising, though there could be more available effort to rack up rebounds, steals and blocks. Ultimately, Adebayo is an ascending star on one of the East's top teams who already has a proven track record. He's durable, his floor is high, and he deserves to be selected in the second or third round of most fantasy drafts.
GS (G)
G
74
Min
33.8
FPTS
2,061.0
REB
381.0
AST
514.0
STL
90.0
BLK
23.0
TO
241.0
FGM
688.0
FGA
1,448.0
FTM
354.0
FTA
385.0
After missing nearly all of 2019-20 due to a broken hand, Curry came back in massively impressive fashion last season. He ranked second in fantasy on a per-game basis -- the fourth time in his career he has ranked in the top 2. In 34.2 minutes per game, the future first-ballot Hall-of-Famer averaged a league-high 32.0 points, 5.8 assists, 5.5 rebounds and 1.2 steals. He also made a career-high 5.3 threes per game on 12.7 attempts (42.1 percent). The departure of Kevin Durant and absence of Klay Thompson (Achilles) forced Curry to take on a massive role for the Warriors, who just barely missed the playoffs as a result of failing to make it through the play-in games. As a testament to his superb season, Curry scored a career-high 62 points against the Trail Blazers in early January. With Thompson set to return during the upcoming season, Curry may not need to lead the league in scoring for the Warriors to make the playoffs, especially with the West less top-heavy due to the Clippers being down Kawhi Leonard and the Nuggets being down Jamal Murray to start the campaign. Still, Curry is an easy top-5 selection for fantasy managers in 2021-22. He's the fuel that ignites the Warriors' offense, and that will not change anytime soon.
After missing nearly all of 2019-20 due to a broken hand, Curry came back in massively impressive fashion last season. He ranked second in fantasy on a per-game basis -- the fourth time in his career he has ranked in the top 2. In 34.2 minutes per game, the future first-ballot Hall-of-Famer averaged a league-high 32.0 points, 5.8 assists, 5.5 rebounds and 1.2 steals. He also made a career-high 5.3 threes per game on 12.7 attempts (42.1 percent). The departure of Kevin Durant and absence of Klay Thompson (Achilles) forced Curry to take on a massive role for the Warriors, who just barely missed the playoffs as a result of failing to make it through the play-in games. As a testament to his superb season, Curry scored a career-high 62 points against the Trail Blazers in early January. With Thompson set to return during the upcoming season, Curry may not need to lead the league in scoring for the Warriors to make the playoffs, especially with the West less top-heavy due to the Clippers being down Kawhi Leonard and the Nuggets being down Jamal Murray to start the campaign. Still, Curry is an easy top-5 selection for fantasy managers in 2021-22. He's the fuel that ignites the Warriors' offense, and that will not change anytime soon.
BOS (F)
G
78
Min
35.8
FPTS
2,021.0
REB
567.0
AST
358.0
STL
99.0
BLK
50.0
TO
191.0
FGM
729.0
FGA
1,601.0
FTM
376.0
FTA
442.0
Tatum returns to the Celtics after his second consecutive All-Star season as well as a significant role on gold-winning Team USA at the Summer Olympics. Tatum and fellow All-Star Jaylen Brown are now the undisputed leaders of the team after the Celtics, in June, traded Kemba Walker to OKC (he was later bought out and signed with the Knicks). Last year, Walker attempted 15.7 shots per game. Expect some of those attempts to shift to Tatum, who led the team last year with 26.4 points and 20.6 shot attempts per game. Little is known about new Celtics' coach Ime Udoka as he begins his reign in Boston. He has mentioned that Boston most improve on last year's 27th rank in total assists. That implies that Tatum, who averaged a career-high 4.3 dimes per game last year, might be expected to distribute even more. Udoka has hinted at pushing both Tatum and Brown harder than prior coach Brad Stevens ever did. Despite four years of NBA experience, Tatum is still only 23 years old. There is still upside for him to improve on a 2020-21 season in which he ranked 10th in the NBA in points per game, 11th in total three-pointers and 13th in usage percentage. Keep in mind that Tatum has improved his points, rebounds and assists per game in each of his four years in the Association. And he's always a threat to earn two-plus combined steals and blocks per contest. Expect Tatum to contend for All-NBA status in 2021-22.
Tatum returns to the Celtics after his second consecutive All-Star season as well as a significant role on gold-winning Team USA at the Summer Olympics. Tatum and fellow All-Star Jaylen Brown are now the undisputed leaders of the team after the Celtics, in June, traded Kemba Walker to OKC (he was later bought out and signed with the Knicks). Last year, Walker attempted 15.7 shots per game. Expect some of those attempts to shift to Tatum, who led the team last year with 26.4 points and 20.6 shot attempts per game. Little is known about new Celtics' coach Ime Udoka as he begins his reign in Boston. He has mentioned that Boston most improve on last year's 27th rank in total assists. That implies that Tatum, who averaged a career-high 4.3 dimes per game last year, might be expected to distribute even more. Udoka has hinted at pushing both Tatum and Brown harder than prior coach Brad Stevens ever did. Despite four years of NBA experience, Tatum is still only 23 years old. There is still upside for him to improve on a 2020-21 season in which he ranked 10th in the NBA in points per game, 11th in total three-pointers and 13th in usage percentage. Keep in mind that Tatum has improved his points, rebounds and assists per game in each of his four years in the Association. And he's always a threat to earn two-plus combined steals and blocks per contest. Expect Tatum to contend for All-NBA status in 2021-22.
PHI (C)
G
64
Min
32.6
FPTS
2,015.0
REB
715.0
AST
211.0
STL
63.0
BLK
94.0
TO
220.0
FGM
576.0
FGA
1,120.0
FTM
562.0
FTA
670.0
Embiid is coming off a 2020-21 season in which he finished second in MVP voting behind Nikola Jokic. In 31.1 minutes per game, Embiid averaged 28.5 points, 10.6 rebounds, 2.8 assists and 2.4 combined blocks-plus-steals. He also posted a career-high true shooting percentage (63.6) by a significant margin. The result was him finishing as the fifth-best fantasy player on a per-game basis. However, he continued to miss time with injury and appeared in just 51 games, limiting his total fantasy production to 16th overall. Injuries are still the overarching theme with Embiid, as his career high in games played is 64 (2018-19). He's a top-five fantasy talent but will often slip to the end of the first round due to the concern. Heading into 2021-22, not much should change regarding Embiid's role, and there's potential for him to see more usage if Ben Simmons is traded, as has been rumored all offseason. That could create better floor spacing for Embiid to work in the post. Even if Simmons doesn't get dealt, Embiid will still presumably put up MVP-caliber numbers as one of the best two centers in the NBA.
Embiid is coming off a 2020-21 season in which he finished second in MVP voting behind Nikola Jokic. In 31.1 minutes per game, Embiid averaged 28.5 points, 10.6 rebounds, 2.8 assists and 2.4 combined blocks-plus-steals. He also posted a career-high true shooting percentage (63.6) by a significant margin. The result was him finishing as the fifth-best fantasy player on a per-game basis. However, he continued to miss time with injury and appeared in just 51 games, limiting his total fantasy production to 16th overall. Injuries are still the overarching theme with Embiid, as his career high in games played is 64 (2018-19). He's a top-five fantasy talent but will often slip to the end of the first round due to the concern. Heading into 2021-22, not much should change regarding Embiid's role, and there's potential for him to see more usage if Ben Simmons is traded, as has been rumored all offseason. That could create better floor spacing for Embiid to work in the post. Even if Simmons doesn't get dealt, Embiid will still presumably put up MVP-caliber numbers as one of the best two centers in the NBA.
WAS (G)
G
76
Min
35.6
FPTS
2,011.0
REB
319.0
AST
410.0
STL
94.0
BLK
30.0
TO
223.0
FGM
788.0
FGA
1,625.0
FTM
523.0
FTA
602.0
Beal had one of the best seasons in his career during the 2020-21 season, as he averaged 31.3 points, 4.7 rebounds, 4.4 assists and 1.2 steals. The 28-year-old played in his third All-Star game and finished second for the league's scoring title, only behind Stephen Curry (32.0). The guard set a career-high 60 points last season and managed to record five double-doubles. Beal made career-high marks of 48.5 percent from the field and 88.9 percent from the charity stripe. For the 2021-22 season, the Wizards brought in a defensive-minded coach in Wes Unseld Jr., so Beal's number of steals could see a rise. The former third overall pick's role will likely increase this upcoming season, as ball-dominant guard Russell Westbrook is no longer with the Wizards. Washington brought in some key players that could fit in well alongside Beal and could help boost his assists. Beal should also possess the ball more than last year, which could bump up his points per game. With a better team built around Beal, don't be surprised if the guard is taken somewhere in the mid-to-late first round.
Beal had one of the best seasons in his career during the 2020-21 season, as he averaged 31.3 points, 4.7 rebounds, 4.4 assists and 1.2 steals. The 28-year-old played in his third All-Star game and finished second for the league's scoring title, only behind Stephen Curry (32.0). The guard set a career-high 60 points last season and managed to record five double-doubles. Beal made career-high marks of 48.5 percent from the field and 88.9 percent from the charity stripe. For the 2021-22 season, the Wizards brought in a defensive-minded coach in Wes Unseld Jr., so Beal's number of steals could see a rise. The former third overall pick's role will likely increase this upcoming season, as ball-dominant guard Russell Westbrook is no longer with the Wizards. Washington brought in some key players that could fit in well alongside Beal and could help boost his assists. Beal should also possess the ball more than last year, which could bump up his points per game. With a better team built around Beal, don't be surprised if the guard is taken somewhere in the mid-to-late first round.
UTA (C)
G
76
Min
31.8
FPTS
1,976.0
REB
1,021.0
AST
105.0
STL
53.0
BLK
183.0
TO
135.0
FGM
412.0
FGA
601.0
FTM
272.0
FTA
430.0
Gobert doesn't have much left to prove. He's a back-to-back All-Star, a four-time All-NBA selection, a three-time Defensive Player of the Year and a five-time All-Defense player. The 29-year-old is coming off a 2020-21 season in which he led the league in field-goal percentage (67.5) for the second time in his career, averaging 14.3 points, 13.5 rebounds, 2.7 blocks and 1.3 assists in 30.8 minutes. That led to him ranking 33rd on a per-game basis in fantasy -- his fifth straight season inside the top-40. Gobert is the epitome of the traditional, rim-running, shot-blocking, rebounding big man. The two primary detractors from his fantasy value are his free-throw shooting (63.1 percent over the past three years) and his lack of three-point shooting. Still, the rest of his game is so dominant that it practically locks him into third-round value every season. Nothing is expected to change in 2021-22. Gobert is one of the steadiest center options available early in drafts.
Gobert doesn't have much left to prove. He's a back-to-back All-Star, a four-time All-NBA selection, a three-time Defensive Player of the Year and a five-time All-Defense player. The 29-year-old is coming off a 2020-21 season in which he led the league in field-goal percentage (67.5) for the second time in his career, averaging 14.3 points, 13.5 rebounds, 2.7 blocks and 1.3 assists in 30.8 minutes. That led to him ranking 33rd on a per-game basis in fantasy -- his fifth straight season inside the top-40. Gobert is the epitome of the traditional, rim-running, shot-blocking, rebounding big man. The two primary detractors from his fantasy value are his free-throw shooting (63.1 percent over the past three years) and his lack of three-point shooting. Still, the rest of his game is so dominant that it practically locks him into third-round value every season. Nothing is expected to change in 2021-22. Gobert is one of the steadiest center options available early in drafts.
LAC (G)
G
75
Min
34.6
FPTS
1,964.0
REB
498.0
AST
416.0
STL
118.0
BLK
37.0
TO
255.0
FGM
694.0
FGA
1,523.0
FTM
364.0
FTA
423.0
George played over four more minutes per contest last season than in his first campaign with the Clippers, and his output predictably increased to 23.3 points, 6.6 rebounds and 5.2 assists per game. He also ranked 13th in the league with 3.2 treys per contest, shot a career-best 46.7 percent from the field and converted 86.8 percent of his free-throw attempts while knocking down 41.1 percent of tries from beyond the arc. Despite a dip in his usually-hefty steals output (to 1.1 per game), George's numbers were good enough for a top-20 finish in fantasy on a per-game basis, largely justifying his position as a late second-round draft selection. The coming campaign should look notably different for George, who will be the unquestioned centerpiece of the Clippers' offense for most of the season while Kawhi Leonard recovers from ACL surgery. George proved he could handle the burden after Leonard went down in the playoffs last season, posting per-game averages of 29.6 points, 11.0 rebounds, 5.6 assists and 1.4 steals across eight contests as Los Angeles made a courageous run that ended up just short of the NBA Finals. It isn't unfathomable that he could approach those numbers sans Leonard next season, especially if the Clippers need to lean on him to stay in playoff contention. Load management shouldn't be as much of a concern with the team less likely to cruise near the top of the Western Conference standings, though it should be noted that George has had problems staying healthy since coming to Los Angeles. Still, there is enough potential for the 6-foot-8 star to go nuts as the focal point of a hungry squad to consider selecting him near the end of the first round in fantasy drafts.
George played over four more minutes per contest last season than in his first campaign with the Clippers, and his output predictably increased to 23.3 points, 6.6 rebounds and 5.2 assists per game. He also ranked 13th in the league with 3.2 treys per contest, shot a career-best 46.7 percent from the field and converted 86.8 percent of his free-throw attempts while knocking down 41.1 percent of tries from beyond the arc. Despite a dip in his usually-hefty steals output (to 1.1 per game), George's numbers were good enough for a top-20 finish in fantasy on a per-game basis, largely justifying his position as a late second-round draft selection. The coming campaign should look notably different for George, who will be the unquestioned centerpiece of the Clippers' offense for most of the season while Kawhi Leonard recovers from ACL surgery. George proved he could handle the burden after Leonard went down in the playoffs last season, posting per-game averages of 29.6 points, 11.0 rebounds, 5.6 assists and 1.4 steals across eight contests as Los Angeles made a courageous run that ended up just short of the NBA Finals. It isn't unfathomable that he could approach those numbers sans Leonard next season, especially if the Clippers need to lean on him to stay in playoff contention. Load management shouldn't be as much of a concern with the team less likely to cruise near the top of the Western Conference standings, though it should be noted that George has had problems staying healthy since coming to Los Angeles. Still, there is enough potential for the 6-foot-8 star to go nuts as the focal point of a hungry squad to consider selecting him near the end of the first round in fantasy drafts.
BRO (F)
G
69
Min
35.1
FPTS
1,940.0
REB
501.0
AST
360.0
STL
65.0
BLK
75.0
TO
208.0
FGM
638.0
FGA
1,266.0
FTM
406.0
FTA
461.0
Coming off a torn Achilles that kept him out for all of 2019-20, Durant didn't miss a beat in his return to the court for the Nets. While he dealt with injuries and played in just 35 of a possible 72 games, Durant reminded fans and fantasy managers alike that he's one of the most talented players the game has ever seen. He ranked fourth in per-game fantasy production behind 26.9 points, 7.1 rebounds, 5.6 assists and 2.0 combined blocks-plus-steals while shooting 54/45/88. Durant also put together an absurd postseason run in the Nets' hard-fought, seven-game playoff series against the Bucks. For the series, he averaged 35.4 points on 50/35/83 shooting, plus 10.6 rebounds, 5.4 assists and 2.7 combined steals-plus-blocks. Heading into 2021-22, it's tough to say Durant is a true health risk -- especially since last season's injuries had nothing to do with the torn Achilles. But in a vacuum, a 32-year-old seven-footer coming off a major injury, followed by a 35-game season, is someone to think twice about before drafting. No one should question Durant's ability to average 27/7/6 again, but availability matters, and it's really the only concern around Durant at this point. Even so, Durant won't make it out of the first round in most fantasy drafts, and that's understandable. His pedigree and talent are far too enticing for him to slip into the second round.
Coming off a torn Achilles that kept him out for all of 2019-20, Durant didn't miss a beat in his return to the court for the Nets. While he dealt with injuries and played in just 35 of a possible 72 games, Durant reminded fans and fantasy managers alike that he's one of the most talented players the game has ever seen. He ranked fourth in per-game fantasy production behind 26.9 points, 7.1 rebounds, 5.6 assists and 2.0 combined blocks-plus-steals while shooting 54/45/88. Durant also put together an absurd postseason run in the Nets' hard-fought, seven-game playoff series against the Bucks. For the series, he averaged 35.4 points on 50/35/83 shooting, plus 10.6 rebounds, 5.4 assists and 2.7 combined steals-plus-blocks. Heading into 2021-22, it's tough to say Durant is a true health risk -- especially since last season's injuries had nothing to do with the torn Achilles. But in a vacuum, a 32-year-old seven-footer coming off a major injury, followed by a 35-game season, is someone to think twice about before drafting. No one should question Durant's ability to average 27/7/6 again, but availability matters, and it's really the only concern around Durant at this point. Even so, Durant won't make it out of the first round in most fantasy drafts, and that's understandable. His pedigree and talent are far too enticing for him to slip into the second round.
PHO (C)
G
77
Min
32.4
FPTS
1,914.0
REB
855.0
AST
120.0
STL
52.0
BLK
110.0
TO
112.0
FGM
556.0
FGA
904.0
FTM
170.0
FTA
220.0
Last year was a maturation process for Ayton, fueled by the experience and competitiveness of Chris Paul. Paul and Ayton developed a strong bond throughout the season, executing pick-and-rolls and alley-oops with aplomb, and Ayton finished the regular season with 33 double-doubles in 64 games. Paul continued to push Ayton throughout the season, and Ayton responded by exploding in the playoffs, increasing both his rebounds (from 10.5 to 11.8) and points (14.4 to 15.8) per game and displaying dominance on the offensive glass, with a total of 14 double-doubles in 22 playoff games. Fans could see Ayton's confidence and accountability build with each playoff series, leading to an increase in minutes (only Booker had more minutes for the Suns in the last two series) and allowing the team to expand their reliance on him. With the Paul-Ayton duo coming back together again this season and the trust Ayton has earned with his impressive play during the Suns' playoff run, we should expect Ayton to reach new levels on both offense and defense and reward fantasy managers as one of the top five all-around big men in the NBA and potentially worthy of a second-to-third round pick in fantasy.
Last year was a maturation process for Ayton, fueled by the experience and competitiveness of Chris Paul. Paul and Ayton developed a strong bond throughout the season, executing pick-and-rolls and alley-oops with aplomb, and Ayton finished the regular season with 33 double-doubles in 64 games. Paul continued to push Ayton throughout the season, and Ayton responded by exploding in the playoffs, increasing both his rebounds (from 10.5 to 11.8) and points (14.4 to 15.8) per game and displaying dominance on the offensive glass, with a total of 14 double-doubles in 22 playoff games. Fans could see Ayton's confidence and accountability build with each playoff series, leading to an increase in minutes (only Booker had more minutes for the Suns in the last two series) and allowing the team to expand their reliance on him. With the Paul-Ayton duo coming back together again this season and the trust Ayton has earned with his impressive play during the Suns' playoff run, we should expect Ayton to reach new levels on both offense and defense and reward fantasy managers as one of the top five all-around big men in the NBA and potentially worthy of a second-to-third round pick in fantasy.
ATL (G)
G
76
Min
36.0
FPTS
1,910.0
REB
345.0
AST
736.0
STL
84.0
BLK
10.0
TO
373.0
FGM
563.0
FGA
1,300.0
FTM
613.0
FTA
694.0
With the Hawks adding significant talent and depth during the 2020 offseason, Young's role decreased slightly last year. He saw nearly a two-percentage-point drop in usage rate and averaged 25.3 points, 9.4 rebounds and 3.9 assists in 33.7 minutes. The result was Young ranking 22nd in per-game fantasy production compared to his 2019-20 mark of 7th. The point guard also continued to struggle with his field-goal efficiency, shooting just 43.8 percent from the field and 34.3 percent from three. However, he's been able to make up for it with an impressive 88.6 percent free-throw percentage -- a massive boost considering he shot 8.7 free throws per game last season. Young was also part of the Hawks' surprising run to the Eastern Conference Finals, and in his 16 postseason appearances, he averaged 28.8 points on 42/31/87 shooting, 9.5 assists, 2.8 rebounds and 1.3 steals. Notably, he went for 48 points and 11 assists against the Bucks in Game 1 of the ECF. Heading into 2021-22, Atlanta made very few significant offseason moves, so Young's role will remain unchanged. At this point, we know he's a nightly threat for 30-and-10, so Young needs to work on cleaning up his efficiency to improve his fantasy value. Ultimately, his upside as a still-developing 23-year-old makes him an automatic second-round pick.
With the Hawks adding significant talent and depth during the 2020 offseason, Young's role decreased slightly last year. He saw nearly a two-percentage-point drop in usage rate and averaged 25.3 points, 9.4 rebounds and 3.9 assists in 33.7 minutes. The result was Young ranking 22nd in per-game fantasy production compared to his 2019-20 mark of 7th. The point guard also continued to struggle with his field-goal efficiency, shooting just 43.8 percent from the field and 34.3 percent from three. However, he's been able to make up for it with an impressive 88.6 percent free-throw percentage -- a massive boost considering he shot 8.7 free throws per game last season. Young was also part of the Hawks' surprising run to the Eastern Conference Finals, and in his 16 postseason appearances, he averaged 28.8 points on 42/31/87 shooting, 9.5 assists, 2.8 rebounds and 1.3 steals. Notably, he went for 48 points and 11 assists against the Bucks in Game 1 of the ECF. Heading into 2021-22, Atlanta made very few significant offseason moves, so Young's role will remain unchanged. At this point, we know he's a nightly threat for 30-and-10, so Young needs to work on cleaning up his efficiency to improve his fantasy value. Ultimately, his upside as a still-developing 23-year-old makes him an automatic second-round pick.
LAL (F)
G
71
Min
32.8
FPTS
1,897.0
REB
528.0
AST
533.0
STL
78.0
BLK
43.0
TO
256.0
FGM
646.0
FGA
1,266.0
FTM
262.0
FTA
383.0
James' numbers during the 2020-21 campaign were mostly unchanged from the previous season, when he finished second in NBA MVP voting. Aside from a marked dip in assists per game (from 10.2 to a still-generous 7.8), the future Hall-of-Famer's per-game stats (25.0 points, 7.7 rebounds, 2.3 three-pointers) were near carbon copies of his regular-season production during the pandemic-shortened 2019-2020 season. What's more, James upped his field-goal percentage two ticks to 51.3 percent and improved his three-point efficiency from 34.8 percent to 36.5 percent. Yet fantasy managers who used an early draft pick to make James the centerpiece of their team last year largely regretted their selection due to the fact that the veteran played in only 45 of the Lakers' 72 regular-season contests. He tweaked his left ankle in a season-opening loss to the Clippers and played through late March despite never fully recovering, then suffered a right ankle sprain that sidelined him for much of the season's second half. A coinciding injury to co-star Anthony Davis and the Lakers' tumble down the Western Conference standings put the onus on James to return before fully healing, and he did so with mostly positive results down the stretch. While the 36-year-old has proven that age can't keep him from being an elite multi-category producer when healthy, the injury risk has to be a concern, especially since James expressed doubt that he'll "ever get back to 100 percent" following his return from the ankle issue. The good news for Lakers fans is that the team devoted the offseason to bringing in a number of reinforcements -- including Russell Westbrook and Carmelo Anthony -- who will almost certainly help reduce James' workload next season. The presence of Westbrook, in particular, will likely cut into James' per-game production, perhaps knocking him into the second round in most fantasy drafts. The tradeoff may be worth it, however, if James is able to parlay the lesser burden into season-long good health.
James' numbers during the 2020-21 campaign were mostly unchanged from the previous season, when he finished second in NBA MVP voting. Aside from a marked dip in assists per game (from 10.2 to a still-generous 7.8), the future Hall-of-Famer's per-game stats (25.0 points, 7.7 rebounds, 2.3 three-pointers) were near carbon copies of his regular-season production during the pandemic-shortened 2019-2020 season. What's more, James upped his field-goal percentage two ticks to 51.3 percent and improved his three-point efficiency from 34.8 percent to 36.5 percent. Yet fantasy managers who used an early draft pick to make James the centerpiece of their team last year largely regretted their selection due to the fact that the veteran played in only 45 of the Lakers' 72 regular-season contests. He tweaked his left ankle in a season-opening loss to the Clippers and played through late March despite never fully recovering, then suffered a right ankle sprain that sidelined him for much of the season's second half. A coinciding injury to co-star Anthony Davis and the Lakers' tumble down the Western Conference standings put the onus on James to return before fully healing, and he did so with mostly positive results down the stretch. While the 36-year-old has proven that age can't keep him from being an elite multi-category producer when healthy, the injury risk has to be a concern, especially since James expressed doubt that he'll "ever get back to 100 percent" following his return from the ankle issue. The good news for Lakers fans is that the team devoted the offseason to bringing in a number of reinforcements -- including Russell Westbrook and Carmelo Anthony -- who will almost certainly help reduce James' workload next season. The presence of Westbrook, in particular, will likely cut into James' per-game production, perhaps knocking him into the second round in most fantasy drafts. The tradeoff may be worth it, however, if James is able to parlay the lesser burden into season-long good health.
CHI (C)
G
75
Min
33.9
FPTS
1,886.0
REB
828.0
AST
252.0
STL
69.0
BLK
57.0
TO
112.0
FGM
590.0
FGA
1,253.0
FTM
128.0
FTA
157.0
In 2020-21, Vucevic was named an All-Star for the second time in three seasons. He began the season in Orlando before being dealt to Chicago at the trade deadline. The center posted similar numbers with both clubs, finishing with overall averages of 23.4 points, 11.7 rebounds and 3.8 assists in 33.5 minutes. He also put up a 48/40/84 shooting line, fueling one of the more efficient and well-rounded offensive seasons from a big man. That led to him ranking a career-high 13th in per-game fantasy production -- his second time inside the top-20. The Bulls are a re-loaded team heading into 2021-22. Zach LaVine remains on the roster, while offseason moves brought in both Lonzo Ball and DeMar DeRozan. This team figures to be the most talent Vucevic has ever been surrounded by. While that could be good for his legacy, it may negatively impact his overall production. He won't be desperately relied upon to score nearly 25 points per game like he was in Orlando. With LaVine and DeRozan in the mix, there will be plenty of nights when Vucevic won't have to score more than 15 or 20 points. As a result, it wouldn't be surprising if his fantasy value takes a step back. He'll still be one of the best fantasy centers available, but don't bank on Vucevic cruising to early-second-round value again.
In 2020-21, Vucevic was named an All-Star for the second time in three seasons. He began the season in Orlando before being dealt to Chicago at the trade deadline. The center posted similar numbers with both clubs, finishing with overall averages of 23.4 points, 11.7 rebounds and 3.8 assists in 33.5 minutes. He also put up a 48/40/84 shooting line, fueling one of the more efficient and well-rounded offensive seasons from a big man. That led to him ranking a career-high 13th in per-game fantasy production -- his second time inside the top-20. The Bulls are a re-loaded team heading into 2021-22. Zach LaVine remains on the roster, while offseason moves brought in both Lonzo Ball and DeMar DeRozan. This team figures to be the most talent Vucevic has ever been surrounded by. While that could be good for his legacy, it may negatively impact his overall production. He won't be desperately relied upon to score nearly 25 points per game like he was in Orlando. With LaVine and DeRozan in the mix, there will be plenty of nights when Vucevic won't have to score more than 15 or 20 points. As a result, it wouldn't be surprising if his fantasy value takes a step back. He'll still be one of the best fantasy centers available, but don't bank on Vucevic cruising to early-second-round value again.
NY (F)
G
76
Min
36.5
FPTS
1,885.0
REB
760.0
AST
380.0
STL
68.0
BLK
31.0
TO
243.0
FGM
594.0
FGA
1,292.0
FTM
336.0
FTA
418.0
Randle is coming off the best season of his career, securing the 2020-21 Most Improved Player award plus a spot on the All-NBA Second Team. He was handed the keys to the offense for the surprisingly competitive Knicks, and the forward averaged 24.1 points, 10.2 rebounds and 6.0 assists in a league-high 37.6 minutes per game. He also made massive strides as a shooter, hitting 2.3 threes per game at a 41.1 percent clip and converting 81.1 percent of his free throws. However, fantasy managers have reason to expect some regression from Randle in 2021-22. One big reason was his complete collapse in the playoffs. He shot a tragic 29.8 percent from the field in five games against the Hawks, and he totaled more turnovers than assists. In addition, the Knicks made splashes in free agency, notably adding Evan Fournier and Kemba Walker. Both players are capable scorers and playmakers, and they'll be taking plenty of touches away from Randle. The result could be Randle taking a step back from the rank of 26 he owned in fantasy on a per-game basis last season. During his lone season in New Orleans, he ranked 53rd on a per-game basis, which might be closer to where he'll trend in 2021-22. Drafting Randle in the second round would be aggressive, but he's likely built up enough good will with fantasy managers to be a popular third-round selection.
Randle is coming off the best season of his career, securing the 2020-21 Most Improved Player award plus a spot on the All-NBA Second Team. He was handed the keys to the offense for the surprisingly competitive Knicks, and the forward averaged 24.1 points, 10.2 rebounds and 6.0 assists in a league-high 37.6 minutes per game. He also made massive strides as a shooter, hitting 2.3 threes per game at a 41.1 percent clip and converting 81.1 percent of his free throws. However, fantasy managers have reason to expect some regression from Randle in 2021-22. One big reason was his complete collapse in the playoffs. He shot a tragic 29.8 percent from the field in five games against the Hawks, and he totaled more turnovers than assists. In addition, the Knicks made splashes in free agency, notably adding Evan Fournier and Kemba Walker. Both players are capable scorers and playmakers, and they'll be taking plenty of touches away from Randle. The result could be Randle taking a step back from the rank of 26 he owned in fantasy on a per-game basis last season. During his lone season in New Orleans, he ranked 53rd on a per-game basis, which might be closer to where he'll trend in 2021-22. Drafting Randle in the second round would be aggressive, but he's likely built up enough good will with fantasy managers to be a popular third-round selection.
ATL (C)
G
70
Min
30.5
FPTS
1,824.0
REB
982.0
AST
80.0
STL
55.0
BLK
144.0
TO
105.0
FGM
472.0
FGA
780.0
FTM
137.0
FTA
242.0
The transition from Houston to Atlanta didn't faze Capela at all, as he carried on as one of the league's best traditional bigs. In 30.1 minutes per game, he averaged 15.2 points, a league-high 14.3 rebounds and 2.0 blocks while shooting 59.4 percent from the field. Capela and point guard Trae Young immediately developed chemistry, leading to easy points at the rim for Capela, including plenty of alley-oop dunks. His overall numbers led to a 45th-overall fantasy ranking on a per-game basis -- his fourth straight season inside the top 50. Nothing should change heading into the 2021-22 season. Atlanta has a nearly identical roster, and Capela will remain in the role he's always occupied. As a result, fantasy managers can feel extremely confident when drafting Capela. He has one of the highest floors of any center, and he can be comfortably selected around the fourth round.
The transition from Houston to Atlanta didn't faze Capela at all, as he carried on as one of the league's best traditional bigs. In 30.1 minutes per game, he averaged 15.2 points, a league-high 14.3 rebounds and 2.0 blocks while shooting 59.4 percent from the field. Capela and point guard Trae Young immediately developed chemistry, leading to easy points at the rim for Capela, including plenty of alley-oop dunks. His overall numbers led to a 45th-overall fantasy ranking on a per-game basis -- his fourth straight season inside the top 50. Nothing should change heading into the 2021-22 season. Atlanta has a nearly identical roster, and Capela will remain in the role he's always occupied. As a result, fantasy managers can feel extremely confident when drafting Capela. He has one of the highest floors of any center, and he can be comfortably selected around the fourth round.
PHI (F)
G
81
Min
33.1
FPTS
1,800.0
REB
565.0
AST
316.0
STL
68.0
BLK
62.0
TO
129.0
FGM
599.0
FGA
1,220.0
FTM
241.0
FTA
279.0
The 2020-21 season was Harris' second full campaign with the 76ers. He put together a similar season to 2019-20, but marginal increases across the board resulted in the best per-game fantasy production of his career. The forward ranked 36th overall behind 19.5 points on 51/39/89 shooting, 6.8 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 1.7 steals-plus-blocks in 32.5 minutes. Harris was also excellent in the 76ers' 12-game playoff run, averaging 21.8 points on 49/37/88 shooting, 8.5 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 1.0 steals. He's established himself as one of the best non-All-Stars in the NBA. His role shouldn't change this season. There's always the potential for him to see slightly increased usage if Ben Simmons gets traded as rumored, but it's probably not safe to bank on that and draft Harris much earlier than last season's fantasy value. As it stands, he's a nice third-to-fourth-round option.
The 2020-21 season was Harris' second full campaign with the 76ers. He put together a similar season to 2019-20, but marginal increases across the board resulted in the best per-game fantasy production of his career. The forward ranked 36th overall behind 19.5 points on 51/39/89 shooting, 6.8 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 1.7 steals-plus-blocks in 32.5 minutes. Harris was also excellent in the 76ers' 12-game playoff run, averaging 21.8 points on 49/37/88 shooting, 8.5 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 1.0 steals. He's established himself as one of the best non-All-Stars in the NBA. His role shouldn't change this season. There's always the potential for him to see slightly increased usage if Ben Simmons gets traded as rumored, but it's probably not safe to bank on that and draft Harris much earlier than last season's fantasy value. As it stands, he's a nice third-to-fourth-round option.
SAC (G)
G
75
Min
35.5
FPTS
1,795.0
REB
381.0
AST
567.0
STL
121.0
BLK
41.0
TO
257.0
FGM
647.0
FGA
1,355.0
FTM
402.0
FTA
557.0
Fox's fantasy value has practically been unchanged over the past three seasons. As a sophomore, he ranked 46th on a per-game basis; in 2019-20 he ranked 56; in 2020-21 he ranked 47th. Last season, he averaged a career-high 25.2 points, 7.2 assists, 3.5 rebounds and 1.5 steals in 35.1 minutes. While he shot a solid 47.7 percent from the field, Fox hasn't found consistency as a jump-shooter, hitting just 32.2 percent of his threes and 71.9 percent of his free throws. That aspect of his game is what's holding his fantasy value back. But how much can we expect him to improve when he wasn't a shooter in college and had just one flash as a sophomore, when he shot 37.1 percent from three on just 2.9 attempts per game? If Fox improves his percentages, he could be worth a high-third-round selection. If he doesn't, it will be difficult for the 23-year-old to climb up the fantasy ranks. The roster around him in 2021-22 will be essentially the same as last year's, though rookie Davion Mitchell adds another mouth to feed in a backcourt that also features last year's lottery pick, Tyrese Haliburton. It's possible Mitchell cuts into Haliburton's workload, but as the best player of the group, Fox's role as the Kings' No. 1 option should be safe.
Fox's fantasy value has practically been unchanged over the past three seasons. As a sophomore, he ranked 46th on a per-game basis; in 2019-20 he ranked 56; in 2020-21 he ranked 47th. Last season, he averaged a career-high 25.2 points, 7.2 assists, 3.5 rebounds and 1.5 steals in 35.1 minutes. While he shot a solid 47.7 percent from the field, Fox hasn't found consistency as a jump-shooter, hitting just 32.2 percent of his threes and 71.9 percent of his free throws. That aspect of his game is what's holding his fantasy value back. But how much can we expect him to improve when he wasn't a shooter in college and had just one flash as a sophomore, when he shot 37.1 percent from three on just 2.9 attempts per game? If Fox improves his percentages, he could be worth a high-third-round selection. If he doesn't, it will be difficult for the 23-year-old to climb up the fantasy ranks. The roster around him in 2021-22 will be essentially the same as last year's, though rookie Davion Mitchell adds another mouth to feed in a backcourt that also features last year's lottery pick, Tyrese Haliburton. It's possible Mitchell cuts into Haliburton's workload, but as the best player of the group, Fox's role as the Kings' No. 1 option should be safe.
G
71
Min
34.4
FPTS
1,788.0
REB
390.0
AST
468.0
STL
71.0
BLK
56.0
TO
215.0
FGM
597.0
FGA
1,216.0
FTM
395.0
FTA
486.0
Gilgeous-Alexander appeared in just 35 games last season, as a foot injury kept him out from late-March onward. However, he was excellent when he played. The third-year guard ranked 32nd in per-game fantasy production behind 23.7 points, 5.9 assists, 4.7 rebounds and 1.5 combined steals-plus-blocks. And despite being a high-usage player for an awful team, Gilgeous-Alexander managed to be efficient, with shooting splits of 51/42/81. After being drafted 11th in 2018, the 23-year-old has developed into one of the most promising two-way guard prospects in the league. Last season, he truly demonstrated his ability as a three-level scorer. In addition to his great three-point shooting, Gilgeous-Alexander made 49 percent of his floaters and shot 61 percent at the rim. His length and athleticism make him difficult to guard, as evidenced by his 6.5 free-throw attempts per game. He also drew a non-shooting foul on 3.4 percent of OKC's plays -- in the 95th percentile for point guards. At this point, the biggest step will be developing into a better playmaker and increasing his shot volume, perhaps at the cost of some efficiency. Given the state of the Thunder as a rebuilding team, fantasy managers should have no concerns about the guard's usage. He'll continue to be the unquestioned No. 1 option and has potential to build upon his numbers. Optimistic managers can justify taking Gilgeous-Alexander as high as the late second round.
Gilgeous-Alexander appeared in just 35 games last season, as a foot injury kept him out from late-March onward. However, he was excellent when he played. The third-year guard ranked 32nd in per-game fantasy production behind 23.7 points, 5.9 assists, 4.7 rebounds and 1.5 combined steals-plus-blocks. And despite being a high-usage player for an awful team, Gilgeous-Alexander managed to be efficient, with shooting splits of 51/42/81. After being drafted 11th in 2018, the 23-year-old has developed into one of the most promising two-way guard prospects in the league. Last season, he truly demonstrated his ability as a three-level scorer. In addition to his great three-point shooting, Gilgeous-Alexander made 49 percent of his floaters and shot 61 percent at the rim. His length and athleticism make him difficult to guard, as evidenced by his 6.5 free-throw attempts per game. He also drew a non-shooting foul on 3.4 percent of OKC's plays -- in the 95th percentile for point guards. At this point, the biggest step will be developing into a better playmaker and increasing his shot volume, perhaps at the cost of some efficiency. Given the state of the Thunder as a rebuilding team, fantasy managers should have no concerns about the guard's usage. He'll continue to be the unquestioned No. 1 option and has potential to build upon his numbers. Optimistic managers can justify taking Gilgeous-Alexander as high as the late second round.
CHI (G)
G
79
Min
34.4
FPTS
1,775.0
REB
388.0
AST
316.0
STL
88.0
BLK
36.0
TO
269.0
FGM
740.0
FGA
1,525.0
FTM
326.0
FTA
381.0
LaVine's steady improvement continued last season, as he ranked 16th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- the highest mark of his career. The uber-athletic guard averaged 27.4 points on 51/42/85 shooting while adding 5.0 rebounds and 4.9 assists in 35.1 minutes. He had plenty of big games, including five performances with at least 40 points and a 50-point game against the Hawks. That led to him making his first All-Star Game. Heading into 2021-22, LaVine's usage could take a slight dip. Chicago made splashes in the offseason by acquiring both Lonzo Ball and DeMar DeRozan. Both players are capable of taking playmaking responsibilities away from LaVine, which may be a positive for the team but a negative for LaVine's fantasy value. Nikola Vucvic will eat up some post-up possessions as well. It wouldn't be surprising to see LaVine's efficiency stay steady, or possibly improve, but the expectation should be that he steps back from the 30.9 percent usage rate he's enjoyed during his four years with the Bulls. It's still justifiable to draft LaVine in the late-second to early-third round given his potential for another season of an efficient 25/5/5. Just don't expect him to take a significant step forward despite being in his early prime.
LaVine's steady improvement continued last season, as he ranked 16th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- the highest mark of his career. The uber-athletic guard averaged 27.4 points on 51/42/85 shooting while adding 5.0 rebounds and 4.9 assists in 35.1 minutes. He had plenty of big games, including five performances with at least 40 points and a 50-point game against the Hawks. That led to him making his first All-Star Game. Heading into 2021-22, LaVine's usage could take a slight dip. Chicago made splashes in the offseason by acquiring both Lonzo Ball and DeMar DeRozan. Both players are capable of taking playmaking responsibilities away from LaVine, which may be a positive for the team but a negative for LaVine's fantasy value. Nikola Vucvic will eat up some post-up possessions as well. It wouldn't be surprising to see LaVine's efficiency stay steady, or possibly improve, but the expectation should be that he steps back from the 30.9 percent usage rate he's enjoyed during his four years with the Bulls. It's still justifiable to draft LaVine in the late-second to early-third round given his potential for another season of an efficient 25/5/5. Just don't expect him to take a significant step forward despite being in his early prime.
ATL (F)
G
77
Min
32.5
FPTS
1,773.0
REB
650.0
AST
108.0
STL
62.0
BLK
90.0
TO
138.0
FGM
539.0
FGA
928.0
FTM
264.0
FTA
325.0
With the Hawks adding Clint Capela and Danilo Gallinari as frontcourt options last season, Collins wasn't called upon as much as he was in 2019-20. As a result, he saw most of his numbers take a dip. The big man saw 29.3 minutes per game and averaged 17.6 points, 7.4 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.5 combined blocks-plus-steals. Though his box score stats dropped, Collins remained one of the most efficient shooters in the league. He posted a 56/40/83 shooting line, translating into a true shooting percentage of 64.5% -- good for 16th in the NBA. Those numbers resulted in Collins ranking 62nd in fantasy on a per-game basis -- a good mark but much worse than his 2019-20 campaign, when he ranked 12th overall. Despite his role being reduced, the Hawks committed to Collins during free agency, signing him to a five-year, $125 million deal. Atlanta is bringing back almost the exact same roster in 2021-22, so fantasy managers should expect Collins to put up similar numbers. With that being the case, he's a solid investment in the late fourth round onward.
With the Hawks adding Clint Capela and Danilo Gallinari as frontcourt options last season, Collins wasn't called upon as much as he was in 2019-20. As a result, he saw most of his numbers take a dip. The big man saw 29.3 minutes per game and averaged 17.6 points, 7.4 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.5 combined blocks-plus-steals. Though his box score stats dropped, Collins remained one of the most efficient shooters in the league. He posted a 56/40/83 shooting line, translating into a true shooting percentage of 64.5% -- good for 16th in the NBA. Those numbers resulted in Collins ranking 62nd in fantasy on a per-game basis -- a good mark but much worse than his 2019-20 campaign, when he ranked 12th overall. Despite his role being reduced, the Hawks committed to Collins during free agency, signing him to a five-year, $125 million deal. Atlanta is bringing back almost the exact same roster in 2021-22, so fantasy managers should expect Collins to put up similar numbers. With that being the case, he's a solid investment in the late fourth round onward.
LAL (F)
G
68
Min
33.1
FPTS
1,754.0
REB
520.0
AST
216.0
STL
96.0
BLK
133.0
TO
163.0
FGM
578.0
FGA
1,145.0
FTM
401.0
FTA
509.0
Injuries decimated Davis' 2020-21 campaign, limiting the big man to just 36 regular-season games and contributing to a decline in his normally-elite stats. When healthy, he posted per-game averages of 21.8 points, 7.9 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 1.6 blocks -- by no means paltry, but substantially below his marks over the past several campaigns. In addition, the former Kentucky Wildcat shot under 50 percent from the field for the first time in five seasons, converted only 26 percent of his tries from deep and made free-throws at a career-worst 73.8 percent clip. The Lakers' lack of a reliable third option behind Davis and LeBron James was evident as the team tumbled down the Western Conference standings while the two stars dealt with injuries, and Davis' campaign ended with a noble but ill-advised attempt to return too early from a groin injury in Los Angeles' first-round playoff defeat at the hands of the Suns. The organization reloaded during the offseason, adding a superstar in Russell Westbrook along with other key pieces, including Carmelo Anthony and Dwight Howard. Los Angeles no doubt hopes these additions will take some of the load off James and Davis, allowing both players to enjoy healthy rest more often and preventing a repeat of last season's disappointing early-round playoff exit. That would be a boon for a squad considered among the favorites for the NBA Championship, but not so much for the fantasy outputs of the stars involved. Westbrook's presence, in particular, is likely to cut into some of Davis' offensive and rebounding opportunities, though the point guard's playmaking skills could also help the big man garner more frequent easy shots. Health will continue to be the most pertinent risk factor for managers looking to draft Davis, and with the Westbrook factor now part of the equation, it wouldn't be surprising to see The Brow slide down to the second round in fantasy drafts.
Injuries decimated Davis' 2020-21 campaign, limiting the big man to just 36 regular-season games and contributing to a decline in his normally-elite stats. When healthy, he posted per-game averages of 21.8 points, 7.9 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 1.6 blocks -- by no means paltry, but substantially below his marks over the past several campaigns. In addition, the former Kentucky Wildcat shot under 50 percent from the field for the first time in five seasons, converted only 26 percent of his tries from deep and made free-throws at a career-worst 73.8 percent clip. The Lakers' lack of a reliable third option behind Davis and LeBron James was evident as the team tumbled down the Western Conference standings while the two stars dealt with injuries, and Davis' campaign ended with a noble but ill-advised attempt to return too early from a groin injury in Los Angeles' first-round playoff defeat at the hands of the Suns. The organization reloaded during the offseason, adding a superstar in Russell Westbrook along with other key pieces, including Carmelo Anthony and Dwight Howard. Los Angeles no doubt hopes these additions will take some of the load off James and Davis, allowing both players to enjoy healthy rest more often and preventing a repeat of last season's disappointing early-round playoff exit. That would be a boon for a squad considered among the favorites for the NBA Championship, but not so much for the fantasy outputs of the stars involved. Westbrook's presence, in particular, is likely to cut into some of Davis' offensive and rebounding opportunities, though the point guard's playmaking skills could also help the big man garner more frequent easy shots. Health will continue to be the most pertinent risk factor for managers looking to draft Davis, and with the Westbrook factor now part of the equation, it wouldn't be surprising to see The Brow slide down to the second round in fantasy drafts.
CHR (G)
G
77
Min
34.2
FPTS
1,741.0
REB
477.0
AST
584.0
STL
129.0
BLK
30.0
TO
220.0
FGM
503.0
FGA
1,101.0
FTM
240.0
FTA
316.0
The 2020-21 Rookie of the Year had one of the more impressive debut seasons in recent memory. It didn't take long for him to be inserted into the starting five. He drew his first start in February and never gave up the spot. As a starter, he averaged 18.1 points, 6.2 assists, 5.9 rebounds and 1.7 steals, and he racked up plenty of highlight passes along the way. From Feb. 1 onward, Ball ranked as the 42nd-best fantasy player on a per-game basis -- an extremely impressive mark for a rookie. His role won't change heading into 2021-22, and there's a good chance he'll be able to improve his stats in Year 2. He was a good three-point shooter (2.1 makes per game at 37.9 percent as a starter) but has room to improve his field-goal percentage (43.8%) and free-throw percentage (75.9%). If Ball can do that, or add to his counting stats, he should easily be worth a fourth-round selection in most fantasy drafts. Aggressive fantasy managers have justification to take him in the third round or possibly even late-second if significant improvement is assumed.
The 2020-21 Rookie of the Year had one of the more impressive debut seasons in recent memory. It didn't take long for him to be inserted into the starting five. He drew his first start in February and never gave up the spot. As a starter, he averaged 18.1 points, 6.2 assists, 5.9 rebounds and 1.7 steals, and he racked up plenty of highlight passes along the way. From Feb. 1 onward, Ball ranked as the 42nd-best fantasy player on a per-game basis -- an extremely impressive mark for a rookie. His role won't change heading into 2021-22, and there's a good chance he'll be able to improve his stats in Year 2. He was a good three-point shooter (2.1 makes per game at 37.9 percent as a starter) but has room to improve his field-goal percentage (43.8%) and free-throw percentage (75.9%). If Ball can do that, or add to his counting stats, he should easily be worth a fourth-round selection in most fantasy drafts. Aggressive fantasy managers have justification to take him in the third round or possibly even late-second if significant improvement is assumed.
NOR (C)
G
74
Min
29.6
FPTS
1,739.0
REB
876.0
AST
156.0
STL
36.0
BLK
83.0
TO
151.0
FGM
454.0
FGA
810.0
FTM
184.0
FTA
237.0
Last season was Valanciunas' best. The center saw 28.3 minutes per game and averaged 17.1 points, 12.5 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.5 combined blocks-plus-steals with the Grizzlies. He also shot a career-high 59.2 percent from the field. That led to him ranking 41st in fantasy on a per-game basis -- his third season in a row improving his value. Valanciunas will be on a different team in 2021-22, however, as he was dealt from Memphis to New Orleans, where he'll now share a frontcourt with emerging star Zion Williamson. It would be surprising for Valanciunas to be given fewer minutes in his new environment, though it's possible his numbers take a slight dip while playing next to the high-usage tandem of Williamson and Brandon Ingram. It's also possible we see Valanciunas shoot more threes to help space the floor for Williamson, who does all of his damage at the rim. In theory, Valanciunas can space the floor, but he's never been a high-volume outside shooter, so it will be interesting to see if that part of his game is emphasized. Over the past four seasons, Valanciunas is a combined 97-of-270 (35.9 percent) from beyond the arc. Playing alongside Williamson could lead to more competition for rebounds, but Valanciunas should still be a walking 15-and-10, making him a high-floor option in the early-middle rounds of most fantasy drafts.
Last season was Valanciunas' best. The center saw 28.3 minutes per game and averaged 17.1 points, 12.5 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.5 combined blocks-plus-steals with the Grizzlies. He also shot a career-high 59.2 percent from the field. That led to him ranking 41st in fantasy on a per-game basis -- his third season in a row improving his value. Valanciunas will be on a different team in 2021-22, however, as he was dealt from Memphis to New Orleans, where he'll now share a frontcourt with emerging star Zion Williamson. It would be surprising for Valanciunas to be given fewer minutes in his new environment, though it's possible his numbers take a slight dip while playing next to the high-usage tandem of Williamson and Brandon Ingram. It's also possible we see Valanciunas shoot more threes to help space the floor for Williamson, who does all of his damage at the rim. In theory, Valanciunas can space the floor, but he's never been a high-volume outside shooter, so it will be interesting to see if that part of his game is emphasized. Over the past four seasons, Valanciunas is a combined 97-of-270 (35.9 percent) from beyond the arc. Playing alongside Williamson could lead to more competition for rebounds, but Valanciunas should still be a walking 15-and-10, making him a high-floor option in the early-middle rounds of most fantasy drafts.
MIA (F)
G
69
Min
33.3
FPTS
1,738.0
REB
476.0
AST
434.0
STL
132.0
BLK
38.0
TO
149.0
FGM
429.0
FGA
884.0
FTM
447.0
FTA
526.0
Missed games continue to be a theme in Butler's career, but he had his best fantasy season on a per-game basis last season, finishing as the league's ninth-most productive player. In his 52 appearances, the veteran averaged 21.5 points, 7.1 assists, 6.9 rebounds and a league-high 2.1 steals in 33.6 minutes. He also shot a career-high 49.7 percent from the field. During the offseason, the Heat found some help for Butler, adding Kyle Lowry to the team's core. The addition of Lowry should alleviate some of Butler's playmaking and scoring responsibilities. As a result, it wouldn't be surprising to see Butler's points and assists take a slight dip. The change shouldn't be drastic, but fantasy managers shouldn't expect another career year from the 32-year-old. From 2014-15 to 2019-20, Butler finished between 13th and 23rd on a per-game basis in fantasy, which is a range he'll likely occupy again in 2021-22. Aggressive fantasy managers may take him at the end of the first round, but he should mostly get drafted in round two.
Missed games continue to be a theme in Butler's career, but he had his best fantasy season on a per-game basis last season, finishing as the league's ninth-most productive player. In his 52 appearances, the veteran averaged 21.5 points, 7.1 assists, 6.9 rebounds and a league-high 2.1 steals in 33.6 minutes. He also shot a career-high 49.7 percent from the field. During the offseason, the Heat found some help for Butler, adding Kyle Lowry to the team's core. The addition of Lowry should alleviate some of Butler's playmaking and scoring responsibilities. As a result, it wouldn't be surprising to see Butler's points and assists take a slight dip. The change shouldn't be drastic, but fantasy managers shouldn't expect another career year from the 32-year-old. From 2014-15 to 2019-20, Butler finished between 13th and 23rd on a per-game basis in fantasy, which is a range he'll likely occupy again in 2021-22. Aggressive fantasy managers may take him at the end of the first round, but he should mostly get drafted in round two.
UTA (G)
G
77
Min
34.1
FPTS
1,729.0
REB
338.0
AST
392.0
STL
78.0
BLK
16.0
TO
204.0
FGM
720.0
FGA
1,622.0
FTM
394.0
FTA
463.0
Last season marked Mitchell's second consecutive All-Star selection. In 33.4 minutes per game, the shooting guard averaged career highs in points (26.4), assists (5.2) and three-point percentage (38.6). The result was the best per-game fantasy production of his career, as he ranked 34th overall. Yet again, Mitchell was excellent in the postseason. Over his past 17 career playoff games, he's averaged 33.9 points on 48/46/88 shooting, 5.2 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 1.1 steals. Mitchell's varied offensive repertoire and excellent athleticism has made him difficult to guard since he entered the league, but he's been coming into his own more of late. The increase in assists is a great sign, and he also attempted a career-high 6.0 free-throw attempts per game last season. He might be surrounded by too much talent to be a 30 point-per-game player, but that also allows Mitchell the opportunity to hone in on his efficiency, playmaking and defense. Fantasy managers know exactly what they're getting out of Mitchell at this point. He has one of the highest floors of any non-All-NBA player and is an easy selection in the third round of most fantasy drafts.
Last season marked Mitchell's second consecutive All-Star selection. In 33.4 minutes per game, the shooting guard averaged career highs in points (26.4), assists (5.2) and three-point percentage (38.6). The result was the best per-game fantasy production of his career, as he ranked 34th overall. Yet again, Mitchell was excellent in the postseason. Over his past 17 career playoff games, he's averaged 33.9 points on 48/46/88 shooting, 5.2 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 1.1 steals. Mitchell's varied offensive repertoire and excellent athleticism has made him difficult to guard since he entered the league, but he's been coming into his own more of late. The increase in assists is a great sign, and he also attempted a career-high 6.0 free-throw attempts per game last season. He might be surrounded by too much talent to be a 30 point-per-game player, but that also allows Mitchell the opportunity to hone in on his efficiency, playmaking and defense. Fantasy managers know exactly what they're getting out of Mitchell at this point. He has one of the highest floors of any non-All-NBA player and is an easy selection in the third round of most fantasy drafts.
PHO (G)
G
74
Min
34.2
FPTS
1,725.0
REB
299.0
AST
459.0
STL
62.0
BLK
18.0
TO
266.0
FGM
680.0
FGA
1,394.0
FTM
409.0
FTA
462.0
Fresh off a deep playoff run that ended with a disappointing Game 6 loss to the Bucks, Booker will look to lead the Suns back for another Finals appearance in 2022. But to do that, he's going to need, at a minimum, to repeat his stellar numbers from last season. That's no easy feat, as Booker excelled across the board in his sixth year, recording 25.6 points per game, shooting 48.4 percent from the field and 86.7 from the line, with 4.3 assists, 4.2 rebounds, 0.8 steals and 1.9 threes. That said, Booker is in a solid position to improve his numbers from last year. Chris Paul will be 36 years old and will no doubt be relying on Booker to carry even more of the offense, and Booker's three-point attempts, which in 2020-21 was the lowest in four years, could rise back to previous levels. If Booker can build on his playoff experience, he could return top-10 eight-category league value this season. Even if he delivers numbers consistent with last year, you're looking at a solid mid-second round pick.
Fresh off a deep playoff run that ended with a disappointing Game 6 loss to the Bucks, Booker will look to lead the Suns back for another Finals appearance in 2022. But to do that, he's going to need, at a minimum, to repeat his stellar numbers from last season. That's no easy feat, as Booker excelled across the board in his sixth year, recording 25.6 points per game, shooting 48.4 percent from the field and 86.7 from the line, with 4.3 assists, 4.2 rebounds, 0.8 steals and 1.9 threes. That said, Booker is in a solid position to improve his numbers from last year. Chris Paul will be 36 years old and will no doubt be relying on Booker to carry even more of the offense, and Booker's three-point attempts, which in 2020-21 was the lowest in four years, could rise back to previous levels. If Booker can build on his playoff experience, he could return top-10 eight-category league value this season. Even if he delivers numbers consistent with last year, you're looking at a solid mid-second round pick.
BOS (F)
G
73
Min
34.9
FPTS
1,700.0
REB
480.0
AST
263.0
STL
86.0
BLK
26.0
TO
165.0
FGM
687.0
FGA
1,424.0
FTM
254.0
FTA
335.0
After his first All-Star season, Brown returns to the Celtics with even higher expectations. In 2020-21, Brown delivered per game career-highs in points (24.7), assists (3.4) and three-pointers (2.8), while shooting a career-best 48.4 percent from the field. With the departure of Kemba Walker to OKC, Brown and fellow All-Star Jayson Tatum are the undisputed leaders in Boston. Walker's absence should shift additional shots and ball-handling opportunities to Brown, Tatum and Marcus Smart. Despite Brown's five years in the Association, he turns only 25 years old in October. He has improved his points per game in each of his five seasons and shot a career-best 76.4 percent from the charity stripe last year. The only blemish on Brown's 2020-21 season was the occasional nagging injury. He missed Boston's last eight regular-season games and five playoff matches due to a wrist injury that required surgery in May. Brown is expected to be fully healthy by the start of training camp. New Celtic coach Ime Udoka has hinted at pushing Brown and Tatum harder than their previous coach -- the mild-mannered Brad Stevens. Boston is certainly ready for a culture change after last season's disappointing 36-36 season. Look for Brown to help lead that change and strive for his second All-Star season.
After his first All-Star season, Brown returns to the Celtics with even higher expectations. In 2020-21, Brown delivered per game career-highs in points (24.7), assists (3.4) and three-pointers (2.8), while shooting a career-best 48.4 percent from the field. With the departure of Kemba Walker to OKC, Brown and fellow All-Star Jayson Tatum are the undisputed leaders in Boston. Walker's absence should shift additional shots and ball-handling opportunities to Brown, Tatum and Marcus Smart. Despite Brown's five years in the Association, he turns only 25 years old in October. He has improved his points per game in each of his five seasons and shot a career-best 76.4 percent from the charity stripe last year. The only blemish on Brown's 2020-21 season was the occasional nagging injury. He missed Boston's last eight regular-season games and five playoff matches due to a wrist injury that required surgery in May. Brown is expected to be fully healthy by the start of training camp. New Celtic coach Ime Udoka has hinted at pushing Brown and Tatum harder than their previous coach -- the mild-mannered Brad Stevens. Boston is certainly ready for a culture change after last season's disappointing 36-36 season. Look for Brown to help lead that change and strive for his second All-Star season.
LAL (G)
G
71
Min
33.8
FPTS
1,695.0
REB
628.0
AST
532.0
STL
111.0
BLK
23.0
TO
306.0
FGM
572.0
FGA
1,277.0
FTM
330.0
FTA
469.0
Westbrook enjoyed another historic campaign in 2020-21, averaging a triple-double for the fourth time in his past five seasons. His efforts -- especially down the stretch -- made a tangible impact on a Washington squad that went 34-38 and qualified for the postseason for the first time since 2017-18. However, the usual drawbacks to Westbrook's game remained despite the big counting stats. He averaged 4.8 turnovers per contest and shot 43.9 percent from the field, 65.6 percent from the line and 31.5 percent from three-point range. From a fantasy perspective, Westbrook's strengths and struggles make him an elite performer in points leagues but a lesser option in a standard eight- or nine-category head-to-head format. With that said, his production is likely to take a downturn next season given the offseason trade that sent him to Los Angeles to play alongside LeBron James and Anthony Davis. Westbrook has fared well next to a high-usage superstar before. He averaged 27.2 points, 7.9 rebounds and 7.0 assists when teammate James Harden registered the league's second-highest usage rate in 2019-20, but Westbrook has never had to work as a third option as he will behind James and Davis with the Lakers. Perhaps Westbrook will trade a dip in counting stats for increased efficiency, which could buoy his value in nine-category leagues even as it results in a decline in points-based formats. There is also the very real possibility that either (or both) James or Davis could miss parts of the season -- the duo combined to sit out over 60 contests in 2020-21 -- thus catapulting Westbrook back into a more lucrative second-star role. Neither scenario is a guarantee, of course, so drafting Westbrook this season comes with substantially more unknowns than in years past. He is still worthy of a pick within the first few rounds of snake drafts, but the likelihood that he finishes as a steal versus a disappointment is about even.
Westbrook enjoyed another historic campaign in 2020-21, averaging a triple-double for the fourth time in his past five seasons. His efforts -- especially down the stretch -- made a tangible impact on a Washington squad that went 34-38 and qualified for the postseason for the first time since 2017-18. However, the usual drawbacks to Westbrook's game remained despite the big counting stats. He averaged 4.8 turnovers per contest and shot 43.9 percent from the field, 65.6 percent from the line and 31.5 percent from three-point range. From a fantasy perspective, Westbrook's strengths and struggles make him an elite performer in points leagues but a lesser option in a standard eight- or nine-category head-to-head format. With that said, his production is likely to take a downturn next season given the offseason trade that sent him to Los Angeles to play alongside LeBron James and Anthony Davis. Westbrook has fared well next to a high-usage superstar before. He averaged 27.2 points, 7.9 rebounds and 7.0 assists when teammate James Harden registered the league's second-highest usage rate in 2019-20, but Westbrook has never had to work as a third option as he will behind James and Davis with the Lakers. Perhaps Westbrook will trade a dip in counting stats for increased efficiency, which could buoy his value in nine-category leagues even as it results in a decline in points-based formats. There is also the very real possibility that either (or both) James or Davis could miss parts of the season -- the duo combined to sit out over 60 contests in 2020-21 -- thus catapulting Westbrook back into a more lucrative second-star role. Neither scenario is a guarantee, of course, so drafting Westbrook this season comes with substantially more unknowns than in years past. He is still worthy of a pick within the first few rounds of snake drafts, but the likelihood that he finishes as a steal versus a disappointment is about even.
MIL (G)
G
75
Min
31.9
FPTS
1,670.0
REB
444.0
AST
366.0
STL
78.0
BLK
9.0
TO
177.0
FGM
576.0
FGA
1,173.0
FTM
243.0
FTA
269.0
Middleton continued his steady play in 2020-21 despite not being named to the All-Star team. He played an important role as the Bucks' No. 2 offensive option behind two-time MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo. In 33.4 minutes per game, Middleton averaged 20.4 points, 6.0 rebounds, a career-high 5.4 assists and 1.1 steals. He also shot an impressive 48/41/90, fueling his second-most efficient season from a true-shooting perspective (58.8 TS percentage). Middleton's well-rounded stat line led to him ranking 35th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- his second straight year in the top-35 and his sixth straight inside the top-60. Middleton's role should stay practically identical in 2021-22 with the Bucks coming off their first NBA title in 50 years. His steady play should prompt fantasy managers to confidently select Middleton in the third or fourth round in standard leagues.
Middleton continued his steady play in 2020-21 despite not being named to the All-Star team. He played an important role as the Bucks' No. 2 offensive option behind two-time MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo. In 33.4 minutes per game, Middleton averaged 20.4 points, 6.0 rebounds, a career-high 5.4 assists and 1.1 steals. He also shot an impressive 48/41/90, fueling his second-most efficient season from a true-shooting perspective (58.8 TS percentage). Middleton's well-rounded stat line led to him ranking 35th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- his second straight year in the top-35 and his sixth straight inside the top-60. Middleton's role should stay practically identical in 2021-22 with the Bucks coming off their first NBA title in 50 years. His steady play should prompt fantasy managers to confidently select Middleton in the third or fourth round in standard leagues.
PHO (G)
G
77
Min
31.3
FPTS
1,665.0
REB
357.0
AST
650.0
STL
102.0
BLK
12.0
TO
169.0
FGM
450.0
FGA
920.0
FTM
191.0
FTA
208.0
A four-year, $120 million contract means Chris Paul will likely be ending his career as a Phoenix Sun and hitching his ride to the emerging team in an attempt to win that elusive championship ring. Last season, Paul showed unusual hardiness, playing his most games (70 regular season plus 20 playoff games) since 2015-16 and rewarding fantasy owners with 8.9 assists per game (third in the NBA) and a league-best 4-to-1 assist-to-turnover ratio. Paul was clearly the floor general and, while his points per game came down slightly from his career average, he was able to elevate the games of the young players around him and lead the Suns to their first Finals appearance in 28 years. Paul underwent wrist surgery this offseason but is expected to be back for training camp, and we can assume he will bring similar awe-inspiring ball handling and floor leadership this year. However, look for Monty Williams to be potentially resting Paul (who turns 36) throughout the season to ensure he's healthy heading into the postseason. In 2020-21, Cameron Payne proved to be a reliable backup, capable of sparking the offense and handling the rock for chunks of minutes. Payne's usage may result in a slight downtick across the board for Paul, as his minutes per game will likely hover around 30. Assuming Father Time doesn't catch up with Paul, look for him to maintain baseline numbers of at least 15 points, seven assists and four rebounds.
A four-year, $120 million contract means Chris Paul will likely be ending his career as a Phoenix Sun and hitching his ride to the emerging team in an attempt to win that elusive championship ring. Last season, Paul showed unusual hardiness, playing his most games (70 regular season plus 20 playoff games) since 2015-16 and rewarding fantasy owners with 8.9 assists per game (third in the NBA) and a league-best 4-to-1 assist-to-turnover ratio. Paul was clearly the floor general and, while his points per game came down slightly from his career average, he was able to elevate the games of the young players around him and lead the Suns to their first Finals appearance in 28 years. Paul underwent wrist surgery this offseason but is expected to be back for training camp, and we can assume he will bring similar awe-inspiring ball handling and floor leadership this year. However, look for Monty Williams to be potentially resting Paul (who turns 36) throughout the season to ensure he's healthy heading into the postseason. In 2020-21, Cameron Payne proved to be a reliable backup, capable of sparking the offense and handling the rock for chunks of minutes. Payne's usage may result in a slight downtick across the board for Paul, as his minutes per game will likely hover around 30. Assuming Father Time doesn't catch up with Paul, look for him to maintain baseline numbers of at least 15 points, seven assists and four rebounds.
CLE (C)
G
77
Min
30.8
FPTS
1,664.0
REB
765.0
AST
136.0
STL
51.0
BLK
123.0
TO
99.0
FGM
377.0
FGA
605.0
FTM
263.0
FTA
369.0
In January of 2021, the Nets dealt Allen to Cleveland as part of the blockbuster, multi-team deal that sent James Harden from Houston to Brooklyn. Allen then started 40 of 51 games for Cleveland and posted 13.2 points, 9.9 rebounds and 1.4 blocks over 30.3 minutes per contest. That production led the Cavs to sign Allen to a hefty five-year agreement this summer. That long-term deal seems to indicate that it's Kevin Love -- and not Allen -- who will lose minutes to Cleveland's new rookie, Evan Mobley. Frankly, Mobley's slight frame (7-foot, 215 pounds) will be aided by Allen's beefy presence in the post. With the 23-year-old Allen and the 20-year-old Mobley, Cleveland might be set on the block for years to come. Allen shot an impressive 61.8 percent from the field last season on 7.7 attempts per game (and 8.2 with Cleveland). He's a bruising, old-fashioned center who still has plenty of upside. Allen will yet again be a fantasy asset for any team searching for traditional big-man stats. Just don't expect giant scoring numbers, as Allen is probably the third or fourth scoring option behind Darius Garland, Collin Sexton and the rarely-healthy Love.
In January of 2021, the Nets dealt Allen to Cleveland as part of the blockbuster, multi-team deal that sent James Harden from Houston to Brooklyn. Allen then started 40 of 51 games for Cleveland and posted 13.2 points, 9.9 rebounds and 1.4 blocks over 30.3 minutes per contest. That production led the Cavs to sign Allen to a hefty five-year agreement this summer. That long-term deal seems to indicate that it's Kevin Love -- and not Allen -- who will lose minutes to Cleveland's new rookie, Evan Mobley. Frankly, Mobley's slight frame (7-foot, 215 pounds) will be aided by Allen's beefy presence in the post. With the 23-year-old Allen and the 20-year-old Mobley, Cleveland might be set on the block for years to come. Allen shot an impressive 61.8 percent from the field last season on 7.7 attempts per game (and 8.2 with Cleveland). He's a bruising, old-fashioned center who still has plenty of upside. Allen will yet again be a fantasy asset for any team searching for traditional big-man stats. Just don't expect giant scoring numbers, as Allen is probably the third or fourth scoring option behind Darius Garland, Collin Sexton and the rarely-healthy Love.
SAN (G)
G
73
Min
33.7
FPTS
1,654.0
REB
526.0
AST
508.0
STL
134.0
BLK
25.0
TO
182.0
FGM
540.0
FGA
1,200.0
FTM
170.0
FTA
215.0
Murray is coming off the best statistical season of his career after posting career highs in points (15.6), rebounds (7.1) and assists (5.5) per game. That should be a reasonable floor for the former Washington standout heading into 2021-22. With DeMar DeRozan out of the picture, Murray should embrace an even bigger role on offense, and it wouldn't be shocking to see him post a career-best mark in points for the second straight campaign. Murray contributes across the board on a regular basis and is one of the best two-way guards in the league. Durability is somewhat of a concern -- he missed all of 2018-19 with a torn ACL -- but Murray has played at least 66 games in each of the last two shortened seasons, so that may not be an issue going forward. While he might not be able to become a 20-point scorer just yet, Murray's blend of scoring, passing and elite rebounds and steals production puts him on the short list of fantasy breakout candidates this season.
Murray is coming off the best statistical season of his career after posting career highs in points (15.6), rebounds (7.1) and assists (5.5) per game. That should be a reasonable floor for the former Washington standout heading into 2021-22. With DeMar DeRozan out of the picture, Murray should embrace an even bigger role on offense, and it wouldn't be shocking to see him post a career-best mark in points for the second straight campaign. Murray contributes across the board on a regular basis and is one of the best two-way guards in the league. Durability is somewhat of a concern -- he missed all of 2018-19 with a torn ACL -- but Murray has played at least 66 games in each of the last two shortened seasons, so that may not be an issue going forward. While he might not be able to become a 20-point scorer just yet, Murray's blend of scoring, passing and elite rebounds and steals production puts him on the short list of fantasy breakout candidates this season.
TOR (G)
G
75
Min
36.7
FPTS
1,644.0
REB
334.0
AST
565.0
STL
132.0
BLK
44.0
TO
173.0
FGM
527.0
FGA
1,316.0
FTM
259.0
FTA
300.0
Fred VanVleet could be the man this season for the Raptors. With Kyle Lowry in Miami and Pascal Siakam suffering from shoulder surgery, the burden of leading the Raptors into battle probably falls on the 27-year-old guard. FVV's five year history with Toronto demonstrates he's ready for the task at hand. VanVleet has improved his points and rebounds in each of his five seasons, and his assists were on a four-year climb until last season's slight dip. The Wichita State product is coming off a 2020-21 season in which he posted career-highs in per-game points (19.2), rebounds (4.2), blocks (0.7) and made threes (3.3), plus shot a career-best 88.5 percent from the charity stripe. His 6.3 assists and 1.7 steals were rather useful, too. The only concern was his field goal percentage, which dipped to a four-year low of 38.9 percent. That field goal percentage may continue to stay low considering Toronto's other main scoring options are Goran Dragic, Gary Trent and Siakam. Siakam is expected back by mid-November, but like Dragic, he's a candidate to be traded if the Raptors go into rebuild mode. While VanVleet could be facing additional double teams, his arrow continues to point up. Expect a third straight season of 35-plus minutes per game, wonderful counting stats, and possibly a career-first All-Star appearance from the 6-foot-1 guard.
Fred VanVleet could be the man this season for the Raptors. With Kyle Lowry in Miami and Pascal Siakam suffering from shoulder surgery, the burden of leading the Raptors into battle probably falls on the 27-year-old guard. FVV's five year history with Toronto demonstrates he's ready for the task at hand. VanVleet has improved his points and rebounds in each of his five seasons, and his assists were on a four-year climb until last season's slight dip. The Wichita State product is coming off a 2020-21 season in which he posted career-highs in per-game points (19.2), rebounds (4.2), blocks (0.7) and made threes (3.3), plus shot a career-best 88.5 percent from the charity stripe. His 6.3 assists and 1.7 steals were rather useful, too. The only concern was his field goal percentage, which dipped to a four-year low of 38.9 percent. That field goal percentage may continue to stay low considering Toronto's other main scoring options are Goran Dragic, Gary Trent and Siakam. Siakam is expected back by mid-November, but like Dragic, he's a candidate to be traded if the Raptors go into rebuild mode. While VanVleet could be facing additional double teams, his arrow continues to point up. Expect a third straight season of 35-plus minutes per game, wonderful counting stats, and possibly a career-first All-Star appearance from the 6-foot-1 guard.
HOU (F)
G
70
Min
32.8
FPTS
1,642.0
REB
687.0
AST
104.0
STL
59.0
BLK
90.0
TO
146.0
FGM
520.0
FGA
995.0
FTM
250.0
FTA
350.0
Wood had an excellent start to his tenure with the Rockets, averaging 21.0 points, 9.6 rebounds, 1.7 assists, 1.2 blocks and 0.8 steals across 32.3 minutes per game -- all career-highs. The 25-year-old shot 51.4 percent from the field, 37.4 percent from three-point range and 63.1 percent from the free-throw line. Although he struggled from the charity stripe, there is optimism that he can bounce back as he shot over 73.0 percent during each of his previous three seasons. Houston used the 16th overall pick in the 2021 NBA Draft to select Alperen Sengun, a scoring center out of Turkey, but he shouldn't have a large impact on Wood's bottom line. The key for the UNLV product is staying healthy. Wood played in only 41 games during his first season with the Rockets after playing in all but four games with Detroit during the pandemic-shortened 2019-20 campaign. During his only season with the Pistons, Wood finished 88th overall in fantasy scoring. Last year with the Rockets, he finished 137th overall. However, on a per-game basis, the 6-foot-10 forward finished 61st in fantasy scoring during the 2020 campaign. If he can stay on the court, Wood is a threat to be one of the more consistent fantasy producers next season. He could put up similar averages as last year and easily finish inside the top 100.
Wood had an excellent start to his tenure with the Rockets, averaging 21.0 points, 9.6 rebounds, 1.7 assists, 1.2 blocks and 0.8 steals across 32.3 minutes per game -- all career-highs. The 25-year-old shot 51.4 percent from the field, 37.4 percent from three-point range and 63.1 percent from the free-throw line. Although he struggled from the charity stripe, there is optimism that he can bounce back as he shot over 73.0 percent during each of his previous three seasons. Houston used the 16th overall pick in the 2021 NBA Draft to select Alperen Sengun, a scoring center out of Turkey, but he shouldn't have a large impact on Wood's bottom line. The key for the UNLV product is staying healthy. Wood played in only 41 games during his first season with the Rockets after playing in all but four games with Detroit during the pandemic-shortened 2019-20 campaign. During his only season with the Pistons, Wood finished 88th overall in fantasy scoring. Last year with the Rockets, he finished 137th overall. However, on a per-game basis, the 6-foot-10 forward finished 61st in fantasy scoring during the 2020 campaign. If he can stay on the court, Wood is a threat to be one of the more consistent fantasy producers next season. He could put up similar averages as last year and easily finish inside the top 100.
PHI (G)
G
70
Min
34.1
FPTS
1,612.0
REB
560.0
AST
536.0
STL
119.0
BLK
42.0
TO
219.0
FGM
414.0
FGA
762.0
FTM
233.0
FTA
376.0
For a 25-year-old coming off of his third consecutive All-Star appearance, Simmons' stock couldn't be much lower. Thanks to an embarrassing flame-out in Round 2 against Atlanta -- a series in which Simmons had four single-digit scoring games and missed two-thirds of his free throws -- the former No. 1 overall pick finds himself at a career crossroads. As of late-August, he's still a member of the 76ers, but the team has not-so-secretly shopped him around to every GM who will take Daryl Morey's calls. Given how last season ended, it's hard to imagine Simmons isn't donning a new uniform by Opening Night, and there's a strong case to be made that a change of scenery would be in his best interest. For fantasy purposes, it's difficult to project what Simmons' season could look like before we know where he'll play. But he's been remarkably consistent through his first four years in the league, generating elite counting stats -- steals, in particular -- while killing fantasy managers at the free throw line and offering no three-pointers. Nevertheless, Simmons has three top-40 seasons and two top-30 seasons to his name, so if he eventually lands with a team willing to tailor itself around his strengths, Simmons could be set for a bounce-back.
For a 25-year-old coming off of his third consecutive All-Star appearance, Simmons' stock couldn't be much lower. Thanks to an embarrassing flame-out in Round 2 against Atlanta -- a series in which Simmons had four single-digit scoring games and missed two-thirds of his free throws -- the former No. 1 overall pick finds himself at a career crossroads. As of late-August, he's still a member of the 76ers, but the team has not-so-secretly shopped him around to every GM who will take Daryl Morey's calls. Given how last season ended, it's hard to imagine Simmons isn't donning a new uniform by Opening Night, and there's a strong case to be made that a change of scenery would be in his best interest. For fantasy purposes, it's difficult to project what Simmons' season could look like before we know where he'll play. But he's been remarkably consistent through his first four years in the league, generating elite counting stats -- steals, in particular -- while killing fantasy managers at the free throw line and offering no three-pointers. Nevertheless, Simmons has three top-40 seasons and two top-30 seasons to his name, so if he eventually lands with a team willing to tailor itself around his strengths, Simmons could be set for a bounce-back.
DEN (F)
G
67
Min
32.8
FPTS
1,583.0
REB
531.0
AST
108.0
STL
61.0
BLK
65.0
TO
119.0
FGM
572.0
FGA
1,119.0
FTM
150.0
FTA
184.0
Despite continued concerns about Porter's injury history -- specifically, his surgically repaired back -- he stayed mostly healthy last season and appeared in 61 of 72 regular-season games for the Nuggets. In a breakout campaign, the forward averaged 19.0 points on 54/45/79 shooting, 7.3 rebounds, 1.1 assists and 1.6 combined blocks-plus-steals. His impressive efficiency led to him posting the league's seventh-highest true-shooting percentage (66.3%). He had six 30-point games and 15 double-doubles. Overall, the man they call "MPJ" ranked 43rd in fantasy on a per-game basis. Heading into 2021-22, the 23-year-old is in position to improve his numbers across the board. Jamal Murray (knee) could be out for the majority of the regular season, which means Porter will be the clear No. 2 option behind Nikola Jokic. With Murray off the court last season, Porter averaged 24.0 points, 8.1 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.0 blocks, plus 3.4 made threes per 36 minutes. If he's able to replicate those numbers, he'll easily be worth a third-round selection. However, fantasy managers need to keep in mind his injury potential. His medicals were reportedly some of the worst that teams had ever seen coming into the 2018 Draft, which is what caused him to slip to the 14th pick.
Despite continued concerns about Porter's injury history -- specifically, his surgically repaired back -- he stayed mostly healthy last season and appeared in 61 of 72 regular-season games for the Nuggets. In a breakout campaign, the forward averaged 19.0 points on 54/45/79 shooting, 7.3 rebounds, 1.1 assists and 1.6 combined blocks-plus-steals. His impressive efficiency led to him posting the league's seventh-highest true-shooting percentage (66.3%). He had six 30-point games and 15 double-doubles. Overall, the man they call "MPJ" ranked 43rd in fantasy on a per-game basis. Heading into 2021-22, the 23-year-old is in position to improve his numbers across the board. Jamal Murray (knee) could be out for the majority of the regular season, which means Porter will be the clear No. 2 option behind Nikola Jokic. With Murray off the court last season, Porter averaged 24.0 points, 8.1 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.0 blocks, plus 3.4 made threes per 36 minutes. If he's able to replicate those numbers, he'll easily be worth a third-round selection. However, fantasy managers need to keep in mind his injury potential. His medicals were reportedly some of the worst that teams had ever seen coming into the 2018 Draft, which is what caused him to slip to the 14th pick.
TOR (F)
G
67
Min
34.1
FPTS
1,581.0
REB
499.0
AST
338.0
STL
80.0
BLK
57.0
TO
160.0
FGM
551.0
FGA
1,218.0
FTM
266.0
FTA
328.0
After four years of continuous growth, Siakam appeared to plateau during what was a tough 2020-21 season for the Raptors. For starters, the Raptors played all their "home" games in Tampa Bay. They also finished with a 27-45 record and missed the playoffs. Siakam's per game points (21.4), rebounds (7.2) and blocks (0.7) dipped modestly last year, though his steals (1.1) and assists (4.5) improved. And his free throw percentage improved to 82.7 percent. With four games left in the season, Siakam hurt his left shoulder, which led to surgery in early June. The procedure means he's unlikely to be available at the start of the 2021-22 season and could miss a few weeks of action. As he enters his age-27 season, Siakam has been involved in various trade rumors, which makes sense if Toronto decides to go into rebuild mode now that Kyle Lowry is in Miami. The Association was surprised to see Toronto take 6-foot-9 forward Scottie Barnes with the fourth pick in last summer's draft. Most experts believed the Raptors would snag high-scoring guard Jalen Suggs. The addition of Barnes certainly adds validity to the Siakam trade rumors. Both Golden State and Sacramento have been rumored destinations. Assuming Siakam stays with Toronto, the departure of Lowry should make more shots available for both him and Fred VanVleet. A healthy Siakam could, come December, see more field goal attempts than last year's 17.2 per game. If he can shake off his shoulder issues, a return to Siakam's 2019-20 All-Star production is certainly possible.
After four years of continuous growth, Siakam appeared to plateau during what was a tough 2020-21 season for the Raptors. For starters, the Raptors played all their "home" games in Tampa Bay. They also finished with a 27-45 record and missed the playoffs. Siakam's per game points (21.4), rebounds (7.2) and blocks (0.7) dipped modestly last year, though his steals (1.1) and assists (4.5) improved. And his free throw percentage improved to 82.7 percent. With four games left in the season, Siakam hurt his left shoulder, which led to surgery in early June. The procedure means he's unlikely to be available at the start of the 2021-22 season and could miss a few weeks of action. As he enters his age-27 season, Siakam has been involved in various trade rumors, which makes sense if Toronto decides to go into rebuild mode now that Kyle Lowry is in Miami. The Association was surprised to see Toronto take 6-foot-9 forward Scottie Barnes with the fourth pick in last summer's draft. Most experts believed the Raptors would snag high-scoring guard Jalen Suggs. The addition of Barnes certainly adds validity to the Siakam trade rumors. Both Golden State and Sacramento have been rumored destinations. Assuming Siakam stays with Toronto, the departure of Lowry should make more shots available for both him and Fred VanVleet. A healthy Siakam could, come December, see more field goal attempts than last year's 17.2 per game. If he can shake off his shoulder issues, a return to Siakam's 2019-20 All-Star production is certainly possible.
POR (G)
G
74
Min
36.4
FPTS
1,580.0
REB
313.0
AST
370.0
STL
81.0
BLK
29.0
TO
134.0
FGM
694.0
FGA
1,537.0
FTM
160.0
FTA
195.0
A broken foot limited McCollum to 47 games last season, but he was excellent when available. He put together his best per-game fantasy production (rank 42) since 2016-17 (29). In 34.0 minutes, the shooting guard averaged 23.1 points, 4.7 assists (both career highs) and 3.9 rebounds. He also made a career-high 3.6 triples per game, though it came at the cost of decreased attempts at the rim, which isn't necessarily a good thing. Regardless, Portland's No. 2 option continues to put together great seasons in his prime and is one of the best never-been-an-All-Star players of the last decade. Heading into 2021-22, fantasy managers have reason to draft McCollum marginally higher than usual. The Damian Lillard trade rumors are flying, and if he's eventually dealt, it would likely open up more usage for McCollum. Even if it's McCollum, himself, who gets traded, he could land in a spot where he's given more reign as a playmaker. And if nothing happens and the Blazers stay intact, McCollum could still be worth a fourth-round pick in most fantasy leagues. His floor is extremely high, and last year was an anomaly, from a health perspective. In each season from 2015-16 through 2019-20, McCollum appeared in at least 70 games.
A broken foot limited McCollum to 47 games last season, but he was excellent when available. He put together his best per-game fantasy production (rank 42) since 2016-17 (29). In 34.0 minutes, the shooting guard averaged 23.1 points, 4.7 assists (both career highs) and 3.9 rebounds. He also made a career-high 3.6 triples per game, though it came at the cost of decreased attempts at the rim, which isn't necessarily a good thing. Regardless, Portland's No. 2 option continues to put together great seasons in his prime and is one of the best never-been-an-All-Star players of the last decade. Heading into 2021-22, fantasy managers have reason to draft McCollum marginally higher than usual. The Damian Lillard trade rumors are flying, and if he's eventually dealt, it would likely open up more usage for McCollum. Even if it's McCollum, himself, who gets traded, he could land in a spot where he's given more reign as a playmaker. And if nothing happens and the Blazers stay intact, McCollum could still be worth a fourth-round pick in most fantasy leagues. His floor is extremely high, and last year was an anomaly, from a health perspective. In each season from 2015-16 through 2019-20, McCollum appeared in at least 70 games.
CLE (G)
G
81
Min
35.2
FPTS
1,576.0
REB
248.0
AST
351.0
STL
101.0
BLK
9.0
TO
210.0
FGM
696.0
FGA
1,473.0
FTM
405.0
FTA
486.0
Sexton is coming off a 2020-21 season, his third in the league, in which he continued to improve in most stat categories. His 24.3 points per game were good for 18th in the NBA. He also ranked 17th in field goal attempts -- a number that likely won't climb any higher. Sexton's aggressive style also paid off at the charity stripe, where he shot 81.5 percent and ranked 14th in free throws made. The third-year-guard missed 12 games, but he averaged 35.3 minutes per contest, which ranked 10th in the league. This is a long way of saying that while Sexton had a great third season, there may not be much more room for improvement. Fellow young guard Darius Garland has earned a similarly prominent role in the Cleveland offense. As Garland continues to improve, he will presumably take some playmaking duties from Sexton, who dished an impressive 4.4 dimes per game last season. The addition of No. 3 pick Evan Mobley -- and the absence of Andre Drummond -- hopefully means Cleveland will play a more up-tempo game. The Cavs ranked 25th in total possessions last season. Overall, there's a good chance Sexton can closely replicate last season's production, but fantasy managers probably shouldn't reach to acquire the Alabama product's services.
Sexton is coming off a 2020-21 season, his third in the league, in which he continued to improve in most stat categories. His 24.3 points per game were good for 18th in the NBA. He also ranked 17th in field goal attempts -- a number that likely won't climb any higher. Sexton's aggressive style also paid off at the charity stripe, where he shot 81.5 percent and ranked 14th in free throws made. The third-year-guard missed 12 games, but he averaged 35.3 minutes per contest, which ranked 10th in the league. This is a long way of saying that while Sexton had a great third season, there may not be much more room for improvement. Fellow young guard Darius Garland has earned a similarly prominent role in the Cleveland offense. As Garland continues to improve, he will presumably take some playmaking duties from Sexton, who dished an impressive 4.4 dimes per game last season. The addition of No. 3 pick Evan Mobley -- and the absence of Andre Drummond -- hopefully means Cleveland will play a more up-tempo game. The Cavs ranked 25th in total possessions last season. Overall, there's a good chance Sexton can closely replicate last season's production, but fantasy managers probably shouldn't reach to acquire the Alabama product's services.
NOR (F)
G
73
Min
35.0
FPTS
1,574.0
REB
365.0
AST
350.0
STL
59.0
BLK
46.0
TO
231.0
FGM
608.0
FGA
1,307.0
FTM
352.0
FTA
409.0
Ingram's 2020-21 campaign was quite similar to his 2019-20 season, though he was unable to repeat as a Western Conference All-Star. The forward saw 34.3 minutes per game and averaged 23.8 points, 4.9 rebounds, 4.9 assists and 1.3 combined steals-plus-blocks. He also owned the league's 20th-best free-throw percentage (87.8%), making 4.6 per contest. Those numbers led to him ranking 39th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- a dip from his rank of 22nd in 2019-20. The 24-year-old will continue fighting for touches with teammate Zion Williamson. While both young players are the primary offensive engines of the Pelicans, the organizational focus will always be on making sure Williamson is happy -- even if that's at the cost of some usage for Ingram. As a result, Ingram's numbers could again stagnate. That shouldn't discourage fantasy managers from taking a chance on him, however, as he's a proven young player and always has the potential to improve. Given that he should be able to closely replicate his numbers from the last two seasons, Ingram makes for a solid third-round target in standard leagues.
Ingram's 2020-21 campaign was quite similar to his 2019-20 season, though he was unable to repeat as a Western Conference All-Star. The forward saw 34.3 minutes per game and averaged 23.8 points, 4.9 rebounds, 4.9 assists and 1.3 combined steals-plus-blocks. He also owned the league's 20th-best free-throw percentage (87.8%), making 4.6 per contest. Those numbers led to him ranking 39th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- a dip from his rank of 22nd in 2019-20. The 24-year-old will continue fighting for touches with teammate Zion Williamson. While both young players are the primary offensive engines of the Pelicans, the organizational focus will always be on making sure Williamson is happy -- even if that's at the cost of some usage for Ingram. As a result, Ingram's numbers could again stagnate. That shouldn't discourage fantasy managers from taking a chance on him, however, as he's a proven young player and always has the potential to improve. Given that he should be able to closely replicate his numbers from the last two seasons, Ingram makes for a solid third-round target in standard leagues.
MEM (G)
G
77
Min
33.3
FPTS
1,565.0
REB
330.0
AST
570.0
STL
72.0
BLK
22.0
TO
272.0
FGM
601.0
FGA
1,312.0
FTM
326.0
FTA
432.0
The 2019-20 Rookie of the Year, Morant's numbers took a step back last season. He ranked 74th in per-game fantasy production as a rookie, with that number dropping to 114th in 2020-21. The main culprit was his decreasing efficiency. All of Morant's shooting percentages fell, with the point guard hitting just 44.9 percent of his field goals and 72.8 percent of his free throws. He's also not a positive in the three-pointers (1.2) or steals (0.9) categories. Obviously, Morant's 19.1 points and 7.4 assists per game were excellent, but his real-life reputation far outweighed his fantasy value last season. That said, it's clear that Morant has what it takes to be an elite point guard. His performances in the play-in games and five playoff contests were fantastic. In his final seven appearances, Morant averaged 29.4 points, 7.6 assists, 5.1 rebounds, 1.0 steals and 2.4 threes across 41.3 minutes on 48/37/73 shooting. Morant will need to find a way to become a consistent three-point shooter and stat-accumulating defender to make a massive leap as a fantasy player, but he absolutely has the talent to do it. Plus, he's already proven he can be a nightly 30-and-10 threat with a below-average jumpshot. Based on pure upside, Morant will be a popular selection, potentially as high as the third round, but fantasy managers must be cognizant of the holes in his stat profile over his first two NBA seasons.
The 2019-20 Rookie of the Year, Morant's numbers took a step back last season. He ranked 74th in per-game fantasy production as a rookie, with that number dropping to 114th in 2020-21. The main culprit was his decreasing efficiency. All of Morant's shooting percentages fell, with the point guard hitting just 44.9 percent of his field goals and 72.8 percent of his free throws. He's also not a positive in the three-pointers (1.2) or steals (0.9) categories. Obviously, Morant's 19.1 points and 7.4 assists per game were excellent, but his real-life reputation far outweighed his fantasy value last season. That said, it's clear that Morant has what it takes to be an elite point guard. His performances in the play-in games and five playoff contests were fantastic. In his final seven appearances, Morant averaged 29.4 points, 7.6 assists, 5.1 rebounds, 1.0 steals and 2.4 threes across 41.3 minutes on 48/37/73 shooting. Morant will need to find a way to become a consistent three-point shooter and stat-accumulating defender to make a massive leap as a fantasy player, but he absolutely has the talent to do it. Plus, he's already proven he can be a nightly 30-and-10 threat with a below-average jumpshot. Based on pure upside, Morant will be a popular selection, potentially as high as the third round, but fantasy managers must be cognizant of the holes in his stat profile over his first two NBA seasons.
SAC (C)
G
72
Min
29.6
FPTS
1,553.0
REB
614.0
AST
115.0
STL
49.0
BLK
111.0
TO
89.0
FGM
442.0
FGA
697.0
FTM
163.0
FTA
202.0
After Holmes posted his best season of his career, Sacramento locked down the rising star with a four-year, $55 million contract. The 2015 second-round pick posted 14.2 points, 8.3 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 1.6 blocks in 29.2 minutes per game -- all career-highs. The 37-year-old shot 63.7 percent from the field and 79.4 percent from the free-throw line, finishing 48th overall in fantasy scoring -- his first time cracking the top 100. During the 2019-20 campaign, he only played in 44 games and finished 47th in fantasy scoring on a per-game basis. In 61 games last season, he maintained that solid production, finishing 56th on a per-game basis. The Kings currently have both Tristan Thompson and Alex Len on their roster to serve as backups, and while Thompson is likely to be moved before the start of the season, neither serve as a threat to Holmes' starting spot. If Sacramento elects to keep Thompson, it is likely they would make a concerted effort to play Holmes at the power forward spot, something he did regularly when Marvin Bagley was injured over the past two seasons. With De'Aaron Fox, Buddy Hield and Tyrese Haliburton running and spacing the floor, the Kings have the making of a prolific offensive squad. As a key contributor, Holmes should once again be a potent fantasy threat all season long.
After Holmes posted his best season of his career, Sacramento locked down the rising star with a four-year, $55 million contract. The 2015 second-round pick posted 14.2 points, 8.3 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 1.6 blocks in 29.2 minutes per game -- all career-highs. The 37-year-old shot 63.7 percent from the field and 79.4 percent from the free-throw line, finishing 48th overall in fantasy scoring -- his first time cracking the top 100. During the 2019-20 campaign, he only played in 44 games and finished 47th in fantasy scoring on a per-game basis. In 61 games last season, he maintained that solid production, finishing 56th on a per-game basis. The Kings currently have both Tristan Thompson and Alex Len on their roster to serve as backups, and while Thompson is likely to be moved before the start of the season, neither serve as a threat to Holmes' starting spot. If Sacramento elects to keep Thompson, it is likely they would make a concerted effort to play Holmes at the power forward spot, something he did regularly when Marvin Bagley was injured over the past two seasons. With De'Aaron Fox, Buddy Hield and Tyrese Haliburton running and spacing the floor, the Kings have the making of a prolific offensive squad. As a key contributor, Holmes should once again be a potent fantasy threat all season long.
BRO (G)
G
61
Min
33.6
FPTS
1,536.0
REB
300.0
AST
341.0
STL
84.0
BLK
31.0
TO
162.0
FGM
579.0
FGA
1,175.0
FTM
231.0
FTA
250.0
Irving had an excellent 2020-21 season, ranking sixth in fantasy on a per-game basis for a second straight season and top 10 for the fifth time in his career. However, Irving continued to deal with both injuries and personal absences, which combined to limit him to 54 appearances. The point guard averaged 26.9 points, 6.0 assists, 4.8 rebounds and 1.4 steals while posting a career-high true shooting percentage (61.4%) via shooting splits of 51/40/92. He also kept his turnovers extremely low (2.4 per game), as has been the case for the bulk of his career, which is arguably his most underrated skill given his usage. Irving shouldn't see his role change much in 2021-22. The seven-time-All-Star will continue as one of the members of the Nets' Big 3, where he will share playmaking and scoring duties with Kevin Durant and James Harden. It's possible Irving's usage takes a slight step back if Durant and Harden stay healthier this season -- a distinct possibility -- but that shouldn't force Irving's fantasy value to take a significant hit. There's no question that Irving has second-round or even late-first-round upside if he can stay healthy, but his mounting durability concerns must be factored into the equation. Including last season, Irving has missed at least 15 games in five of the last six campaigns. And he's missed double-digit contests in all but one of his 10 NBA seasons.
Irving had an excellent 2020-21 season, ranking sixth in fantasy on a per-game basis for a second straight season and top 10 for the fifth time in his career. However, Irving continued to deal with both injuries and personal absences, which combined to limit him to 54 appearances. The point guard averaged 26.9 points, 6.0 assists, 4.8 rebounds and 1.4 steals while posting a career-high true shooting percentage (61.4%) via shooting splits of 51/40/92. He also kept his turnovers extremely low (2.4 per game), as has been the case for the bulk of his career, which is arguably his most underrated skill given his usage. Irving shouldn't see his role change much in 2021-22. The seven-time-All-Star will continue as one of the members of the Nets' Big 3, where he will share playmaking and scoring duties with Kevin Durant and James Harden. It's possible Irving's usage takes a slight step back if Durant and Harden stay healthier this season -- a distinct possibility -- but that shouldn't force Irving's fantasy value to take a significant hit. There's no question that Irving has second-round or even late-first-round upside if he can stay healthy, but his mounting durability concerns must be factored into the equation. Including last season, Irving has missed at least 15 games in five of the last six campaigns. And he's missed double-digit contests in all but one of his 10 NBA seasons.
CHI (F)
G
75
Min
33.5
FPTS
1,527.0
REB
357.0
AST
357.0
STL
76.0
BLK
22.0
TO
178.0
FGM
529.0
FGA
1,034.0
FTM
363.0
FTA
409.0
DeRozan is coming off another strong fantasy season with the Spurs. He's been one of the most consistent fantasy options across the past half-decade. Since 2013-14, he's ranked between 39th and 72nd in per-game production. Last season, he ranked 51st behind 21.6 points, 4.2 rebounds and career-high marks in assists (6.9) and free-throw percentage (88.0%). Over the summer, DeRozan headlined a sign-and-trade that shipped him north to Chicago, where he teams up with Zach LaVine and Nikola Vucevic. With the Bulls, he'll continue to start and see 30-plus minutes per game. However, given the other offensive options around him -- including Lonzo Ball, who also came over via a separate sign-and-trade -- DeRozan won't need to carry as much of a burden as he did in San Antonio. That could be a positive development for his efficiency, but it wouldn't be surprising if DeRozan's box score stats take a meaningful dip. There's still reason to consider drafting DeRozan around the fourth or fifth round given his high floor and general consistency, but his ceiling is much lower than in recent years.
DeRozan is coming off another strong fantasy season with the Spurs. He's been one of the most consistent fantasy options across the past half-decade. Since 2013-14, he's ranked between 39th and 72nd in per-game production. Last season, he ranked 51st behind 21.6 points, 4.2 rebounds and career-high marks in assists (6.9) and free-throw percentage (88.0%). Over the summer, DeRozan headlined a sign-and-trade that shipped him north to Chicago, where he teams up with Zach LaVine and Nikola Vucevic. With the Bulls, he'll continue to start and see 30-plus minutes per game. However, given the other offensive options around him -- including Lonzo Ball, who also came over via a separate sign-and-trade -- DeRozan won't need to carry as much of a burden as he did in San Antonio. That could be a positive development for his efficiency, but it wouldn't be surprising if DeRozan's box score stats take a meaningful dip. There's still reason to consider drafting DeRozan around the fourth or fifth round given his high floor and general consistency, but his ceiling is much lower than in recent years.
MIL (G)
G
71
Min
32.5
FPTS
1,481.0
REB
319.0
AST
449.0
STL
115.0
BLK
52.0
TO
154.0
FGM
469.0
FGA
958.0
FTM
164.0
FTA
215.0
After seven seasons with the Pelicans, Holiday was dealt to the Bucks in the summer of 2020. While he understandably saw his usage rate decrease while playing alongside two-time MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo and Khris Middleton, his fantasy value actually increased due to increased efficiency. Holiday posted a career-high 59.2 true shooting percentage behind 50/39/79 splits on 17.7 points per game. He also added 6.1 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 2.2 combined steals-plus-blocks. That resulted in Holiday ranking 27th in per-game fantasy production -- the third-highest mark of his career. He was no stranger to big games, either, as Holiday produced four games with at least 20 points, 10 assists, one steal and one block. For 2021-22, Holiday should occupy the same exact role he did in 2020-21. He'll act as one of the Bucks' Big 3, supplying great all-around, two-way production. His upside is relatively low, but Holiday makes for a nice fantasy option around the third round.
After seven seasons with the Pelicans, Holiday was dealt to the Bucks in the summer of 2020. While he understandably saw his usage rate decrease while playing alongside two-time MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo and Khris Middleton, his fantasy value actually increased due to increased efficiency. Holiday posted a career-high 59.2 true shooting percentage behind 50/39/79 splits on 17.7 points per game. He also added 6.1 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 2.2 combined steals-plus-blocks. That resulted in Holiday ranking 27th in per-game fantasy production -- the third-highest mark of his career. He was no stranger to big games, either, as Holiday produced four games with at least 20 points, 10 assists, one steal and one block. For 2021-22, Holiday should occupy the same exact role he did in 2020-21. He'll act as one of the Bucks' Big 3, supplying great all-around, two-way production. His upside is relatively low, but Holiday makes for a nice fantasy option around the third round.
SAN (F)
G
78
Min
33.2
FPTS
1,471.0
REB
542.0
AST
181.0
STL
69.0
BLK
46.0
TO
112.0
FGM
449.0
FGA
921.0
FTM
300.0
FTA
379.0
After an encouraging end to his rookie campaign in 2019-20, Johnson took another step forward last season, putting up 12.8 points, 6.0 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 28.5 minutes per game. With the Spurs finally poised to enter a rebuild, Johnson will likely be entrusted with a larger workload this season -- particularly after Rudy Gay and DeMar DeRozan departed in free agency. He'll still have to compete with new arrivals Thaddeus Young and Doug McDermott, but Johnson will have the inside track to a starting frontcourt spot. If things break right, Johnson could push for top-75 value, though for that to happen he'll need to improve his free throw shooting and defensive numbers.
After an encouraging end to his rookie campaign in 2019-20, Johnson took another step forward last season, putting up 12.8 points, 6.0 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 28.5 minutes per game. With the Spurs finally poised to enter a rebuild, Johnson will likely be entrusted with a larger workload this season -- particularly after Rudy Gay and DeMar DeRozan departed in free agency. He'll still have to compete with new arrivals Thaddeus Young and Doug McDermott, but Johnson will have the inside track to a starting frontcourt spot. If things break right, Johnson could push for top-75 value, though for that to happen he'll need to improve his free throw shooting and defensive numbers.
LAC (C)
G
77
Min
23.8
FPTS
1,443.0
REB
750.0
AST
113.0
STL
22.0
BLK
91.0
TO
84.0
FGM
319.0
FGA
529.0
FTM
176.0
FTA
229.0
Zubac continued to improve during his second full season with the Clippers, posting career-high minutes (22.3) and points (9.0) per game last year while shooting a personal best 65.2 percent from the field. The 24-year-old's biggest strength has been his reliability as he hasn't missed a regular season game over the past two seasons. Despite placing 157th in fantasy scoring on a per-game basis, Zubac finished last season 100th overall in fantasy scoring. The fifth-year center will offer consistent production on a nightly basis, something that is hard to come by in the current state of the NBA. A healthy Serge Ibaka during the 2021-22 campaign may hinder Zubac's playing time, but it won't have a devastating effect on his bottom line. Zubac remains worth a look in 12-team leagues thanks to his efficient scoring and big rebounding numbers.
Zubac continued to improve during his second full season with the Clippers, posting career-high minutes (22.3) and points (9.0) per game last year while shooting a personal best 65.2 percent from the field. The 24-year-old's biggest strength has been his reliability as he hasn't missed a regular season game over the past two seasons. Despite placing 157th in fantasy scoring on a per-game basis, Zubac finished last season 100th overall in fantasy scoring. The fifth-year center will offer consistent production on a nightly basis, something that is hard to come by in the current state of the NBA. A healthy Serge Ibaka during the 2021-22 campaign may hinder Zubac's playing time, but it won't have a devastating effect on his bottom line. Zubac remains worth a look in 12-team leagues thanks to his efficient scoring and big rebounding numbers.
SAC (G)
G
75
Min
32.7
FPTS
1,417.0
REB
263.0
AST
437.0
STL
112.0
BLK
33.0
TO
123.0
FGM
453.0
FGA
964.0
FTM
132.0
FTA
153.0
Haliburton turned heads in his first NBA campaign, earning a selection to the All-Rookie First Team on the strength of 13.0 points, 5.3 assists, 3.0 rebounds, 2.1 three-pointers and 1.3 steals per contest. He was especially effective in 20 games as a starter, posting per-game averages of 14.9 points and 6.0 dimes. The Iowa State product couldn't match the scoring output of Anthony Edwards or LaMelo Ball -- the only two first-year players to finish ahead of him in Rookie of the Year voting -- but he was a much more efficient shooter, knocking down 47.2 percent of his field-goal tries (including 40.9 percent of his attempts from three-point range) and 85.7 percent of his shots from the charity stripe. Haliburton's refined offensive game is a boon to a talented young Kings squad that is looking to end a 15-year playoff drought, but there is some uncertainty regarding how the backcourt will shake out. De'Aaron Fox remains the unquestioned focal point of the offense, and Buddy Hield started every game in which he played last season. Haliburton has performed well next to Fox and seems deserving of a larger role, so Hield could very well end up as the sixth man (if he isn't traded). The addition of rookie Davion Mitchell -- the recently crowned 2021 NBA Sumer League co-MVP -- further complicates the picture, though he isn't likely to significantly threaten Haliburton's minutes off the bat. Despite the mini-logjam, there's zero doubt that Haliburton will get significant playing time in his sophomore campaign. He appears safe as a mid-round selection in fantasy drafts.
Haliburton turned heads in his first NBA campaign, earning a selection to the All-Rookie First Team on the strength of 13.0 points, 5.3 assists, 3.0 rebounds, 2.1 three-pointers and 1.3 steals per contest. He was especially effective in 20 games as a starter, posting per-game averages of 14.9 points and 6.0 dimes. The Iowa State product couldn't match the scoring output of Anthony Edwards or LaMelo Ball -- the only two first-year players to finish ahead of him in Rookie of the Year voting -- but he was a much more efficient shooter, knocking down 47.2 percent of his field-goal tries (including 40.9 percent of his attempts from three-point range) and 85.7 percent of his shots from the charity stripe. Haliburton's refined offensive game is a boon to a talented young Kings squad that is looking to end a 15-year playoff drought, but there is some uncertainty regarding how the backcourt will shake out. De'Aaron Fox remains the unquestioned focal point of the offense, and Buddy Hield started every game in which he played last season. Haliburton has performed well next to Fox and seems deserving of a larger role, so Hield could very well end up as the sixth man (if he isn't traded). The addition of rookie Davion Mitchell -- the recently crowned 2021 NBA Sumer League co-MVP -- further complicates the picture, though he isn't likely to significantly threaten Haliburton's minutes off the bat. Despite the mini-logjam, there's zero doubt that Haliburton will get significant playing time in his sophomore campaign. He appears safe as a mid-round selection in fantasy drafts.
NY (G)
G
80
Min
34.3
FPTS
1,399.0
REB
450.0
AST
271.0
STL
75.0
BLK
30.0
TO
145.0
FGM
541.0
FGA
1,198.0
FTM
245.0
FTA
327.0
Barrett is coming off a productive sophomore season in which he posted 17.6 points, 5.8 boards, 3.0 dimes and 1.7 triples per game while also dramatically improving his shooting percentages. That's the good news. The bad news is New York spent the off-season adding playmakers and shooters in Kemba Walker and Evan Fournier, which seems to lower Barrett on New York's scoring option pecking order. But maybe Barrett will have more room to operate as defenses worry about the two veteran guards. The three-year veteran is definitely, once again, New York's starting small forward, and we know coach Tom Thibodeau loves to give his starters extra minutes. The Knicks' new talented roster will give Thibodeau the option of going small-ball with Randle at the five, surrounded by four proven shooters. That situation would allow Barrett the opportunity to maintain last year's whopping 34.5 minutes per game, despite the new roster additions. At age 21, Barrett still has plenty of upside. Those concerned about his modest rookie season in 2019-20 should take notice and acknowledge Barrett is a player on the rise.
Barrett is coming off a productive sophomore season in which he posted 17.6 points, 5.8 boards, 3.0 dimes and 1.7 triples per game while also dramatically improving his shooting percentages. That's the good news. The bad news is New York spent the off-season adding playmakers and shooters in Kemba Walker and Evan Fournier, which seems to lower Barrett on New York's scoring option pecking order. But maybe Barrett will have more room to operate as defenses worry about the two veteran guards. The three-year veteran is definitely, once again, New York's starting small forward, and we know coach Tom Thibodeau loves to give his starters extra minutes. The Knicks' new talented roster will give Thibodeau the option of going small-ball with Randle at the five, surrounded by four proven shooters. That situation would allow Barrett the opportunity to maintain last year's whopping 34.5 minutes per game, despite the new roster additions. At age 21, Barrett still has plenty of upside. Those concerned about his modest rookie season in 2019-20 should take notice and acknowledge Barrett is a player on the rise.
IND (G)
G
68
Min
34.1
FPTS
1,397.0
REB
365.0
AST
424.0
STL
58.0
BLK
14.0
TO
182.0
FGM
496.0
FGA
1,096.0
FTM
192.0
FTA
219.0
Last year, Brogdon bounced back from a relatively lackluster debut season with the Pacers to average a career-high 21.2 points and 5.3 rebounds across 34.5 minutes per game -- all career highs. The 28-year-old shot 45.4 percent from the field, 38.8 percent from three and 86.4 percent from the free-throw line as he regained his shooting consistency after shooting just 32.6 percent from downtown a year prior. The Virginia product had his best overall season from a fantasy perspective, finishing 56th overall and 52nd on a per-game basis. The only regression that he experienced was in his assists numbers, which fell from a career-high 7.1 per game in 2019-20 to just 5.9 last season -- which was still higher than any of his years with Milwaukee. Indiana drafted Chris Duarte with the No. 13 overall pick in the 2021 NBA Draft, but neither he, nor TJ McConnell, should hinder Brogdon's playing time. With a healthy Caris LeVert, Brogdon may relinquish some of the scoring burden, but he should still be an efficient scorer, as has been the case throughout his career. The pick-and-roll combo of Brogdon with Domantas Sabonis or Myles Turner is lethal on paper and should propel Brogdon to another top-60 fantasy finish.
Last year, Brogdon bounced back from a relatively lackluster debut season with the Pacers to average a career-high 21.2 points and 5.3 rebounds across 34.5 minutes per game -- all career highs. The 28-year-old shot 45.4 percent from the field, 38.8 percent from three and 86.4 percent from the free-throw line as he regained his shooting consistency after shooting just 32.6 percent from downtown a year prior. The Virginia product had his best overall season from a fantasy perspective, finishing 56th overall and 52nd on a per-game basis. The only regression that he experienced was in his assists numbers, which fell from a career-high 7.1 per game in 2019-20 to just 5.9 last season -- which was still higher than any of his years with Milwaukee. Indiana drafted Chris Duarte with the No. 13 overall pick in the 2021 NBA Draft, but neither he, nor TJ McConnell, should hinder Brogdon's playing time. With a healthy Caris LeVert, Brogdon may relinquish some of the scoring burden, but he should still be an efficient scorer, as has been the case throughout his career. The pick-and-roll combo of Brogdon with Domantas Sabonis or Myles Turner is lethal on paper and should propel Brogdon to another top-60 fantasy finish.
PHI (C)
G
78
Min
22.5
FPTS
1,381.0
REB
754.0
AST
142.0
STL
102.0
BLK
87.0
TO
190.0
FGM
380.0
FGA
706.0
FTM
163.0
FTA
275.0
After splitting last season between Cleveland and Los Angeles, Drummond enters 2021-22 with his career at a crossroads. A four-time rebounding champ who leads all active players in career rebounds per game (13.7 RPG), Drummond will likely find himself in a full-time reserve role for the first time since his rookie year in 2012-13. The 28-year-old averaged a double-double for both the Cavs and Lakers last season, but his defensive shortcomings and lack of floor-stretching made him a difficult player to integrate. In Philadelphia, Drummond will essentially slide into the spot vacated by Dwight Howard, which projects to allot him 15-to-20 minutes per night behind Joel Embiid. While Drummond will have to swallow his pride and accept the lesser role, his ability to rack up rebounds, blocks and steals at an extremely high rate should keep him relevant in most fantasy leagues. However, managers must be willing to cope with Drummond's poor free-throw shooting (54.8% over last five seasons).
After splitting last season between Cleveland and Los Angeles, Drummond enters 2021-22 with his career at a crossroads. A four-time rebounding champ who leads all active players in career rebounds per game (13.7 RPG), Drummond will likely find himself in a full-time reserve role for the first time since his rookie year in 2012-13. The 28-year-old averaged a double-double for both the Cavs and Lakers last season, but his defensive shortcomings and lack of floor-stretching made him a difficult player to integrate. In Philadelphia, Drummond will essentially slide into the spot vacated by Dwight Howard, which projects to allot him 15-to-20 minutes per night behind Joel Embiid. While Drummond will have to swallow his pride and accept the lesser role, his ability to rack up rebounds, blocks and steals at an extremely high rate should keep him relevant in most fantasy leagues. However, managers must be willing to cope with Drummond's poor free-throw shooting (54.8% over last five seasons).
DAL (F)
G
60
Min
31.8
FPTS
1,372.0
REB
555.0
AST
107.0
STL
24.0
BLK
95.0
TO
97.0
FGM
461.0
FGA
999.0
FTM
180.0
FTA
221.0
Porzingis' excellent numbers continue to be overshadowed by what feels like constant injury issues. He appeared in just 43 games last season, effectively tanking his overall fantasy value. However, his averages were strong, as the big man ranked 40th on a per-game basis. In 30.9 minutes, Porzingis averaged 20.1 points, 8.9 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 1.8 combined blocks-plus-steals. He also posted strong shooting splits of 48/38/86. However, he was a major disappointment in the first round of the playoffs against the Clippers, where Porzingis averaged just 13.1 points, 5.4 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 2.0 combined steals-plus-blocks in 33.3 minutes. Heading into 2021-22, fantasy managers don't need to be concerned about Porzingis' role. He's still the clear No. 2 option on the Mavericks and can still get better at 26 years old. But the question remains: how high should he be drafted given the injury history? Aggressive fantasy managers can reasonably draft him in the fifth or sixth round. Conservative managers can wait much longer but he has enough upside that he shouldn't slip too far.
Porzingis' excellent numbers continue to be overshadowed by what feels like constant injury issues. He appeared in just 43 games last season, effectively tanking his overall fantasy value. However, his averages were strong, as the big man ranked 40th on a per-game basis. In 30.9 minutes, Porzingis averaged 20.1 points, 8.9 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 1.8 combined blocks-plus-steals. He also posted strong shooting splits of 48/38/86. However, he was a major disappointment in the first round of the playoffs against the Clippers, where Porzingis averaged just 13.1 points, 5.4 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 2.0 combined steals-plus-blocks in 33.3 minutes. Heading into 2021-22, fantasy managers don't need to be concerned about Porzingis' role. He's still the clear No. 2 option on the Mavericks and can still get better at 26 years old. But the question remains: how high should he be drafted given the injury history? Aggressive fantasy managers can reasonably draft him in the fifth or sixth round. Conservative managers can wait much longer but he has enough upside that he shouldn't slip too far.
SAC (F)
G
76
Min
35.6
FPTS
1,353.0
REB
469.0
AST
200.0
STL
47.0
BLK
13.0
TO
96.0
FGM
437.0
FGA
913.0
FTM
243.0
FTA
296.0
Barnes had a surprising bounce-back season as a 28-year-old last season. After ranking outside of the top 140 over the prior two seasons, the forward ranked 88th in per-game production. Much of that improvement was the result of increased efficiency, as Barnes put together the best true-shooting percentage (62.6) of his career. That was partially due to Barnes completely cutting out long mid-range jumpers -- he took just six all season -- and he replaced those shots with more three-pointers. Barnes also showed better playmaking ability, as he handed out a career-high 3.5 dimes per game despite the presence of ball-dominant point guard De'Aaron Fox and impressive rookie guard Tyrese Haliburton. Heading into 2021-22, Barnes' role could stay stagnant, though there's potential for a slight decrease. The Kings drafted guard Davion Mitchell, which could lead to more three-guard lineups, forcing Barnes to play power forward, where he'd be competing with Marvin Bagley for minutes. Barnes is the best of that trio, but the Kings are still rebuilding, so they have to find a way to get their young players meaningful minutes. Regardless, Barnes figures to be a relatively safe option in the final rounds of most standard drafts as a 30-35-minute player.
Barnes had a surprising bounce-back season as a 28-year-old last season. After ranking outside of the top 140 over the prior two seasons, the forward ranked 88th in per-game production. Much of that improvement was the result of increased efficiency, as Barnes put together the best true-shooting percentage (62.6) of his career. That was partially due to Barnes completely cutting out long mid-range jumpers -- he took just six all season -- and he replaced those shots with more three-pointers. Barnes also showed better playmaking ability, as he handed out a career-high 3.5 dimes per game despite the presence of ball-dominant point guard De'Aaron Fox and impressive rookie guard Tyrese Haliburton. Heading into 2021-22, Barnes' role could stay stagnant, though there's potential for a slight decrease. The Kings drafted guard Davion Mitchell, which could lead to more three-guard lineups, forcing Barnes to play power forward, where he'd be competing with Marvin Bagley for minutes. Barnes is the best of that trio, but the Kings are still rebuilding, so they have to find a way to get their young players meaningful minutes. Regardless, Barnes figures to be a relatively safe option in the final rounds of most standard drafts as a 30-35-minute player.
MIN (G)
G
78
Min
33.6
FPTS
1,350.0
REB
388.0
AST
257.0
STL
85.0
BLK
45.0
TO
220.0
FGM
565.0
FGA
1,326.0
FTM
292.0
FTA
373.0
The Rookie of the Year runner-up, Edwards had a mostly encouraging debut season in Minnesota. The No. 1 overall pick ranked 98th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- a number that jumps up to 51st in total production since he played all 72 games in the shortened season. He actually started off slowly, which led to some minor panic, but he made steady improvement from late January onward and really took off in March. During Edwards' final 32 appearances, he averaged 23.3 points on 45/34/76 shooting, 5.4 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 2.1 combined steals-plus-blocks. That stretch included two 42-point performances against strong defenses in Phoenix and Memphis. He also ranked 20th in the league in total steals (82). If fantasy managers can put aside his worryingly inefficient start to his rookie season, Edwards profiles as a potential 20-point-per-game scorer in 2021-22 on passable efficiency. Considering the lack of scoring talent aside from Malik Beasley, D'Angelo Russell and Karl-Anthony Towns, Edwards will be relied upon heavily to generate buckets. While it's not quite a "big three" in Minnesota, Edwards is part of the core trio, and he has a good chance to emerge as the No. 2 guy above Russell.
The Rookie of the Year runner-up, Edwards had a mostly encouraging debut season in Minnesota. The No. 1 overall pick ranked 98th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- a number that jumps up to 51st in total production since he played all 72 games in the shortened season. He actually started off slowly, which led to some minor panic, but he made steady improvement from late January onward and really took off in March. During Edwards' final 32 appearances, he averaged 23.3 points on 45/34/76 shooting, 5.4 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 2.1 combined steals-plus-blocks. That stretch included two 42-point performances against strong defenses in Phoenix and Memphis. He also ranked 20th in the league in total steals (82). If fantasy managers can put aside his worryingly inefficient start to his rookie season, Edwards profiles as a potential 20-point-per-game scorer in 2021-22 on passable efficiency. Considering the lack of scoring talent aside from Malik Beasley, D'Angelo Russell and Karl-Anthony Towns, Edwards will be relied upon heavily to generate buckets. While it's not quite a "big three" in Minnesota, Edwards is part of the core trio, and he has a good chance to emerge as the No. 2 guy above Russell.
TOR (F)
G
68
Min
34.1
FPTS
1,339.0
REB
409.0
AST
191.0
STL
108.0
BLK
55.0
TO
89.0
FGM
421.0
FGA
862.0
FTM
139.0
FTA
184.0
Anunoby has gradually improved during each of his four seasons in the Association. Last season, the Indiana product posted career-bests in per game points (15.9), rebounds (5.5), steals (1.5) and three-pointers (2.4) over a career-high 33.3 minutes per game. Anunoby started all 43 games in which he appeared last season, but a left calf injury forced him to miss 10 games starting in late January, plus the last eight games of the season. He's expected to be healthy in time for training camp and is presumably happy to finally play home games in Toronto instead of Tampa Bay. His frontcourt mate, Pascal Siakam, has been included in a number of rebuilding trade rumors. Should such a deal occur, expectations would soar for Anunoby, who would then be paired with rookie Scottie Barnes. But it's fair to wonder how much growth is left in the 24-year-old's future. That said, his shooting percentages of 48.0 percent from the field and 39.8 percent from behind the arc suggest head coach Nick Nurse should design a few more plays for Anunoby. This appears to be a roster in flux, blurring Anunoby's status heading into the 2021-22 season.
Anunoby has gradually improved during each of his four seasons in the Association. Last season, the Indiana product posted career-bests in per game points (15.9), rebounds (5.5), steals (1.5) and three-pointers (2.4) over a career-high 33.3 minutes per game. Anunoby started all 43 games in which he appeared last season, but a left calf injury forced him to miss 10 games starting in late January, plus the last eight games of the season. He's expected to be healthy in time for training camp and is presumably happy to finally play home games in Toronto instead of Tampa Bay. His frontcourt mate, Pascal Siakam, has been included in a number of rebuilding trade rumors. Should such a deal occur, expectations would soar for Anunoby, who would then be paired with rookie Scottie Barnes. But it's fair to wonder how much growth is left in the 24-year-old's future. That said, his shooting percentages of 48.0 percent from the field and 39.8 percent from behind the arc suggest head coach Nick Nurse should design a few more plays for Anunoby. This appears to be a roster in flux, blurring Anunoby's status heading into the 2021-22 season.
POR (C)
G
63
Min
28.0
FPTS
1,320.0
REB
571.0
AST
223.0
STL
77.0
BLK
89.0
TO
132.0
FGM
362.0
FGA
709.0
FTM
167.0
FTA
237.0
For the past two years, fantasy managers have been chasing Nurkic in hopes he could replicate his fantastic 2018-19 season, when he started 72 games and posted 15.6 points, 10.4 rebounds, 3.2 assists, 1.4 blocks and 1.0 steals in just 27.4 minutes per game. Injuries completely derailed Nurkic's 2019-20 campaign, limiting him to only eight appearances -- all of which came in the NBA bubble. After a strong showing in Orlando, Nurkic appeared poised to bounce back in 2020-21, but injuries again caused him to miss nearly half of the season, and he never fully returned to peak form. This season promises another fresh start for the 27-year-old, who will likely be set for a boost in minutes after seeing only 23.8 per game last season -- his fewest since 2016-17. But given the events of the past two seasons, Nurkic's health has to be a significant part of the calculation when gauging his fantasy value. The big man from Bosnia can likely be had at a discount in drafts, but managers should ensure they have a backup plan in place.
For the past two years, fantasy managers have been chasing Nurkic in hopes he could replicate his fantastic 2018-19 season, when he started 72 games and posted 15.6 points, 10.4 rebounds, 3.2 assists, 1.4 blocks and 1.0 steals in just 27.4 minutes per game. Injuries completely derailed Nurkic's 2019-20 campaign, limiting him to only eight appearances -- all of which came in the NBA bubble. After a strong showing in Orlando, Nurkic appeared poised to bounce back in 2020-21, but injuries again caused him to miss nearly half of the season, and he never fully returned to peak form. This season promises another fresh start for the 27-year-old, who will likely be set for a boost in minutes after seeing only 23.8 per game last season -- his fewest since 2016-17. But given the events of the past two seasons, Nurkic's health has to be a significant part of the calculation when gauging his fantasy value. The big man from Bosnia can likely be had at a discount in drafts, but managers should ensure they have a backup plan in place.
DET (G)
G
75
Min
33.3
FPTS
1,312.0
REB
420.0
AST
391.0
STL
82.0
BLK
36.0
TO
282.0
FGM
423.0
FGA
964.0
FTM
269.0
FTA
322.0
While Detroit did its homework on the other top prospects, Cunningham was the relatively easy choice at No. 1 overall, and he'll enter his first NBA season as the clear-cut Rookie of the Year favorite. Similarly, the Oklahoma State product is the favorite to finish as the top fantasy player in the 2021 rookie class, thanks to a well-rounded stat profile that saw him average 20.1 points, 6.2 rebounds, 3.5 assists, 1.6 steals and 0.8 blocks per game last season. An excellent decision-maker and facilitator with prototypical size (6-8, 220lbs), Cunningham is also an efficient scorer who drilled 40 percent of his 5.7 three-point attempts per game at Oklahoma State. Like all rookies, Cunningham will inevitably go through some rough stretches, but in terms of fantasy value, he easily has the highest floor among the elite prospects. Given that he'll likely be handed the keys to the Pistons' franchise from Day 1, Cunningham projects to be the first rookie off the board in most standard leagues.
While Detroit did its homework on the other top prospects, Cunningham was the relatively easy choice at No. 1 overall, and he'll enter his first NBA season as the clear-cut Rookie of the Year favorite. Similarly, the Oklahoma State product is the favorite to finish as the top fantasy player in the 2021 rookie class, thanks to a well-rounded stat profile that saw him average 20.1 points, 6.2 rebounds, 3.5 assists, 1.6 steals and 0.8 blocks per game last season. An excellent decision-maker and facilitator with prototypical size (6-8, 220lbs), Cunningham is also an efficient scorer who drilled 40 percent of his 5.7 three-point attempts per game at Oklahoma State. Like all rookies, Cunningham will inevitably go through some rough stretches, but in terms of fantasy value, he easily has the highest floor among the elite prospects. Given that he'll likely be handed the keys to the Pistons' franchise from Day 1, Cunningham projects to be the first rookie off the board in most standard leagues.
CHR (G)
G
78
Min
34.1
FPTS
1,312.0
REB
339.0
AST
286.0
STL
88.0
BLK
31.0
TO
165.0
FGM
532.0
FGA
1,223.0
FTM
166.0
FTA
199.0
Despite LaMelo Ball's impressive debut, Rozier actually managed to increase his usage last season and was one of the biggest fantasy surprises. The expectation was that Rozier's role would take a massive hit, but it ended up being Devonte' Graham who suffered. Rozier posted career highs in points (20.4), assists (4.2) and steals (1.3) per game, in addition to field-goal percentage (45.0%). The result was a rank of 48th in fantasy on a per-game basis, and his clean bill of health (69 of 72 games played) allowed him to rank a shocking 22nd overall in total value. The biggest difference in Rozier's offensive repertoire was his increased finishing ability near the basket. He upped his shooting percentage at the rim by six percent and his percentage on short-mid-rangers (mostly floaters) by nine percent. Heading into 2021-22, Rozier's role shouldn't change. Graham was shipped to New Orleans, and while Charlotte brought in Kelly Oubre and James Bouknight, the team has a myriad of lineup combinations to employ. It would be shocking if Rozier finished as second-round value again, but fantasy managers probably shouldn't let him slip past the fifth round, simply given his per-game production.
Despite LaMelo Ball's impressive debut, Rozier actually managed to increase his usage last season and was one of the biggest fantasy surprises. The expectation was that Rozier's role would take a massive hit, but it ended up being Devonte' Graham who suffered. Rozier posted career highs in points (20.4), assists (4.2) and steals (1.3) per game, in addition to field-goal percentage (45.0%). The result was a rank of 48th in fantasy on a per-game basis, and his clean bill of health (69 of 72 games played) allowed him to rank a shocking 22nd overall in total value. The biggest difference in Rozier's offensive repertoire was his increased finishing ability near the basket. He upped his shooting percentage at the rim by six percent and his percentage on short-mid-rangers (mostly floaters) by nine percent. Heading into 2021-22, Rozier's role shouldn't change. Graham was shipped to New Orleans, and while Charlotte brought in Kelly Oubre and James Bouknight, the team has a myriad of lineup combinations to employ. It would be shocking if Rozier finished as second-round value again, but fantasy managers probably shouldn't let him slip past the fifth round, simply given his per-game production.
MIA (G)
G
68
Min
32.5
FPTS
1,291.0
REB
330.0
AST
480.0
STL
80.0
BLK
23.0
TO
188.0
FGM
349.0
FGA
822.0
FTM
193.0
FTA
222.0
Last season, Lowry missed out on his first All-Star game since 2013-14. It was also his worst per-game fantasy rank (38) since 2012-13 (57) -- his first season in Toronto. Still, he was one of the better point guards in fantasy to have last season aside from his 46 games played, as he posted 17.2 points, 7.3 assists, 5.4 rebounds and 1.0 steals in 34.8 minutes. And it was the third-most efficient season of his career by true shooting percentage (59.3) behind splits of 44/40/88. Lowry will be on a new team in 2021-22, as he was part of a sign-and-trade that landed him in Miami on a three-year, $85 million deal. Lowry joins up with Jimmy Butler and Bam Adebayo to make up one of the league's better Big 3s. Given the surrounding talent on the Heat -- including some good depth like Duncan Robinson, Tyler Herro and Victor Oladipo -- it's possible we see Lowry's usage take a dip. Plus, Lowry is 35 years old and hasn't been especially healthy throughout his career, so some plays off would certainly be a benefit for the veteran. Given his age, injury history and team context, Lowry won't be a hot commodity come draft day, but he still commands attention after the third round.
Last season, Lowry missed out on his first All-Star game since 2013-14. It was also his worst per-game fantasy rank (38) since 2012-13 (57) -- his first season in Toronto. Still, he was one of the better point guards in fantasy to have last season aside from his 46 games played, as he posted 17.2 points, 7.3 assists, 5.4 rebounds and 1.0 steals in 34.8 minutes. And it was the third-most efficient season of his career by true shooting percentage (59.3) behind splits of 44/40/88. Lowry will be on a new team in 2021-22, as he was part of a sign-and-trade that landed him in Miami on a three-year, $85 million deal. Lowry joins up with Jimmy Butler and Bam Adebayo to make up one of the league's better Big 3s. Given the surrounding talent on the Heat -- including some good depth like Duncan Robinson, Tyler Herro and Victor Oladipo -- it's possible we see Lowry's usage take a dip. Plus, Lowry is 35 years old and hasn't been especially healthy throughout his career, so some plays off would certainly be a benefit for the veteran. Given his age, injury history and team context, Lowry won't be a hot commodity come draft day, but he still commands attention after the third round.
CLE (G)
G
74
Min
33.6
FPTS
1,284.0
REB
201.0
AST
471.0
STL
82.0
BLK
5.0
TO
206.0
FGM
502.0
FGA
1,095.0
FTM
188.0
FTA
217.0
CHR (F)
G
65
Min
33.3
FPTS
1,276.0
REB
385.0
AST
238.0
STL
67.0
BLK
27.0
TO
135.0
FGM
430.0
FGA
901.0
FTM
229.0
FTA
271.0
In his first season with the Hornets, Hayward averaged 19.6 points, 5.9 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 1.2 steals in 34.0 minutes per game. It wasn't quite the resurgence that some were expecting as he transitioned from being a number three or four option in Boston to the top option in Charlotte. However, he did finish with his highest points per game output since his final season with the Jazz when he averaged 21.9 points per game and finished 33rd overall in fantasy scoring. Hayward has certainly regained his form as a solid fantasy producer. On a per-game basis, the Butler product has finished 52nd and 54th respectively in his past two seasons. The 31-year-old shot efficiently last year, converting 47.3 percent from the field, 41.5 percent from three and 84.3 percent from the free-throw line. However, injuries remain an issue as Hayward has missed 20-plus games in back-to-back seasons. If healthy, Hayward should benefit from the playmaking abilities of reigning Rookie of the Year LaMelo Ball and finish as a top-60 fantasy producer for the third straight season.
In his first season with the Hornets, Hayward averaged 19.6 points, 5.9 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 1.2 steals in 34.0 minutes per game. It wasn't quite the resurgence that some were expecting as he transitioned from being a number three or four option in Boston to the top option in Charlotte. However, he did finish with his highest points per game output since his final season with the Jazz when he averaged 21.9 points per game and finished 33rd overall in fantasy scoring. Hayward has certainly regained his form as a solid fantasy producer. On a per-game basis, the Butler product has finished 52nd and 54th respectively in his past two seasons. The 31-year-old shot efficiently last year, converting 47.3 percent from the field, 41.5 percent from three and 84.3 percent from the free-throw line. However, injuries remain an issue as Hayward has missed 20-plus games in back-to-back seasons. If healthy, Hayward should benefit from the playmaking abilities of reigning Rookie of the Year LaMelo Ball and finish as a top-60 fantasy producer for the third straight season.
DET (F)
G
74
Min
33.5
FPTS
1,272.0
REB
300.0
AST
190.0
STL
53.0
BLK
75.0
TO
83.0
FGM
442.0
FGA
999.0
FTM
330.0
FTA
406.0
After one year, and one impressive playoff run, in Denver, Grant took his talents to Detroit last season and went from productive role player to featured scorer. Grant posted career highs nearly across the board, averaging 22.3 points, 4.6 rebounds, 2.8 assists and 1.1 blocks, while draining 2.1 threes per game at a 35.0 percent clip. Grant did slow down as the season progressed, and he missed several games down the stretch as Detroit shifted its focus toward lottery positioning. Heading into 2021-22, Grant returns as the Pistons' most-established player, but he'll no longer be the chief focus after the team drafted Cade Cunningham with the No. 1 overall pick. Grant still figures to be a priority, but developing Cunningham, and the rest of the young core, could lead to a downturn in overall production.
After one year, and one impressive playoff run, in Denver, Grant took his talents to Detroit last season and went from productive role player to featured scorer. Grant posted career highs nearly across the board, averaging 22.3 points, 4.6 rebounds, 2.8 assists and 1.1 blocks, while draining 2.1 threes per game at a 35.0 percent clip. Grant did slow down as the season progressed, and he missed several games down the stretch as Detroit shifted its focus toward lottery positioning. Heading into 2021-22, Grant returns as the Pistons' most-established player, but he'll no longer be the chief focus after the team drafted Cade Cunningham with the No. 1 overall pick. Grant still figures to be a priority, but developing Cunningham, and the rest of the young core, could lead to a downturn in overall production.
POR (G)
G
77
Min
32.8
FPTS
1,267.0
REB
273.0
AST
155.0
STL
102.0
BLK
36.0
TO
131.0
FGM
500.0
FGA
1,044.0
FTM
223.0
FTA
261.0
A mid-season trade sent Powell from Toronto to Portland, but that did not stop the UCLA product from having the best fantasy season of his career. Across 69 total games (the final 27 came with Portland), Powell averaged a career-high 18.6 points to go with 2.5 three-pointers (also a career best), 3.1 rebounds, 1.9 assists and 1.2 steals. One of the most reliable players in fantasy over the last two seasons, Powell should again be set for a productive 2021-22 campaign. He'll open the season as the unquestioned starter at small forward, where he'll have a chance to approach 35 minutes per game (he averaged 34.4 MPG post-trade last season). The 28-year-old, who signed a lucrative extension in the offseason, can be counted upon for scoring, three-pointers and steals production.
A mid-season trade sent Powell from Toronto to Portland, but that did not stop the UCLA product from having the best fantasy season of his career. Across 69 total games (the final 27 came with Portland), Powell averaged a career-high 18.6 points to go with 2.5 three-pointers (also a career best), 3.1 rebounds, 1.9 assists and 1.2 steals. One of the most reliable players in fantasy over the last two seasons, Powell should again be set for a productive 2021-22 campaign. He'll open the season as the unquestioned starter at small forward, where he'll have a chance to approach 35 minutes per game (he averaged 34.4 MPG post-trade last season). The 28-year-old, who signed a lucrative extension in the offseason, can be counted upon for scoring, three-pointers and steals production.
PHO (F)
G
77
Min
33.1
FPTS
1,263.0
REB
364.0
AST
166.0
STL
111.0
BLK
64.0
TO
91.0
FGM
377.0
FGA
732.0
FTM
130.0
FTA
152.0
In 2020-21, Bridges established himself as a reliable and productive two-way player, displaying imposing defense against opposing teams' best players while improving his per-game fantasy production across the board, with increases in threes (1.9), points (13.5), rebounds (4.3), assists (2.1) and blocks (0.9). Bridges played the most total minutes (2,348) of any Phoenix starter and was an impressive 16th in the league in plus-minus. The 2021-22 season will be Bridges' fourth season in the league, and he is entering his prime. Bridges is the ultimate 3-and-D player (he ranked 15th last year in three-point percentage at 42.5%), and as part of Phoenix's young core, along with Booker, Ayton and Cam Johnson, we can expect him to continue to play big minutes. While Bridges may not be one of the top offensive options on the team, he is highly versatile enough to handle the ball, grab rebounds, hit the outside three and drive to the bucket. We may not have seen Bridges' ceiling yet, and he could potentially reward fantasy owners with another year of increases in stats across the board.
In 2020-21, Bridges established himself as a reliable and productive two-way player, displaying imposing defense against opposing teams' best players while improving his per-game fantasy production across the board, with increases in threes (1.9), points (13.5), rebounds (4.3), assists (2.1) and blocks (0.9). Bridges played the most total minutes (2,348) of any Phoenix starter and was an impressive 16th in the league in plus-minus. The 2021-22 season will be Bridges' fourth season in the league, and he is entering his prime. Bridges is the ultimate 3-and-D player (he ranked 15th last year in three-point percentage at 42.5%), and as part of Phoenix's young core, along with Booker, Ayton and Cam Johnson, we can expect him to continue to play big minutes. While Bridges may not be one of the top offensive options on the team, he is highly versatile enough to handle the ball, grab rebounds, hit the outside three and drive to the bucket. We may not have seen Bridges' ceiling yet, and he could potentially reward fantasy owners with another year of increases in stats across the board.
SAC (G)
G
81
Min
33.6
FPTS
1,243.0
REB
386.0
AST
277.0
STL
81.0
BLK
21.0
TO
206.0
FGM
474.0
FGA
1,155.0
FTM
102.0
FTA
120.0
Hield's production took a slight step back in 2020-21, but he maintained his reputation as one of the league's premier three-point shooters. He made the second-most threes (282) in the NBA at a 39.1 percent clip. That led to 16.6 points per game, and Hield also averaged 4.7 rebounds and 3.6 assists. However, the points were a significant dip from his 2019-20 mark of 19.9 points, and it led to his fantasy value dropping from 53rd to 77th on a per-game basis. Hield's shot diet became even more reliant on threes, which also hurt his overall field-goal percentage (40.6%). He took 58 percent of his shots from distance two years ago, and that increased to 72 percent last year. Heading into 2021-22, Hield will remain an elite three-point threat, but his role is somewhat in jeopardy. Tyrese Haliburton's emergence puts pressure on Hield, and the Kings also drafted guard Davion Mitchell -- a much better defender than Hield. There have been rumors that Hield is on the trading block, but unless something actually comes to fruition before the season, drafting Hield is somewhat of a risk. He still unquestionably needs to be selected before pick 100, but expecting him to return to fifth-round value seems farfetched.
Hield's production took a slight step back in 2020-21, but he maintained his reputation as one of the league's premier three-point shooters. He made the second-most threes (282) in the NBA at a 39.1 percent clip. That led to 16.6 points per game, and Hield also averaged 4.7 rebounds and 3.6 assists. However, the points were a significant dip from his 2019-20 mark of 19.9 points, and it led to his fantasy value dropping from 53rd to 77th on a per-game basis. Hield's shot diet became even more reliant on threes, which also hurt his overall field-goal percentage (40.6%). He took 58 percent of his shots from distance two years ago, and that increased to 72 percent last year. Heading into 2021-22, Hield will remain an elite three-point threat, but his role is somewhat in jeopardy. Tyrese Haliburton's emergence puts pressure on Hield, and the Kings also drafted guard Davion Mitchell -- a much better defender than Hield. There have been rumors that Hield is on the trading block, but unless something actually comes to fruition before the season, drafting Hield is somewhat of a risk. He still unquestionably needs to be selected before pick 100, but expecting him to return to fifth-round value seems farfetched.
GS (F)
G
80
Min
33.7
FPTS
1,239.0
REB
398.0
AST
190.0
STL
71.0
BLK
86.0
TO
138.0
FGM
476.0
FGA
1,044.0
FTM
183.0
FTA
257.0
Wiggins' per-game numbers last season (18.6 points, 4.9 rebounds, 2.4 assists) don't pop off the page, but the veteran did a few things to boost his fantasy value. First, he averaged a block per game over the course of the campaign, finishing as one of only three guard-eligible players to accomplish that feat. Second, Wiggins posted career-best marks from the field (47.7 percent) and from beyond the arc (38.0 percent), offsetting a three-point scoring dip from his previous campaign. Collectively, the 26-year-old's output amounted to mid-round fantasy value on a per-game basis, which is essentially where he has fallen throughout the course of his career. The 2014 first-overall draft pick will likely never produce at a level congruent to his NBA draft position, but he offers durability (he's missed one or zero games in five of his seven professional campaigns) and stable scoring in the high-teens to low-20s. The eventual return of Klay Thompson could cut into Wiggins' offensive opportunities a bit, and he doesn't do enough as a rebounder or distributor to warrant vast enthusiasm as a fantasy pick, but he should once again slide in as a boring-but-useful selection in the middle rounds of drafts, especially if he is able to repeat the shooting efficiency he displayed last season.
Wiggins' per-game numbers last season (18.6 points, 4.9 rebounds, 2.4 assists) don't pop off the page, but the veteran did a few things to boost his fantasy value. First, he averaged a block per game over the course of the campaign, finishing as one of only three guard-eligible players to accomplish that feat. Second, Wiggins posted career-best marks from the field (47.7 percent) and from beyond the arc (38.0 percent), offsetting a three-point scoring dip from his previous campaign. Collectively, the 26-year-old's output amounted to mid-round fantasy value on a per-game basis, which is essentially where he has fallen throughout the course of his career. The 2014 first-overall draft pick will likely never produce at a level congruent to his NBA draft position, but he offers durability (he's missed one or zero games in five of his seven professional campaigns) and stable scoring in the high-teens to low-20s. The eventual return of Klay Thompson could cut into Wiggins' offensive opportunities a bit, and he doesn't do enough as a rebounder or distributor to warrant vast enthusiasm as a fantasy pick, but he should once again slide in as a boring-but-useful selection in the middle rounds of drafts, especially if he is able to repeat the shooting efficiency he displayed last season.
TOR (C)
G
71
Min
25.9
FPTS
1,233.0
REB
474.0
AST
71.0
STL
49.0
BLK
133.0
TO
63.0
FGM
339.0
FGA
690.0
FTM
190.0
FTA
242.0
The 2020-21 season was a breakout year for Boucher. After struggling for meaningful minutes during his first three seasons, Boucher delivered per game career highs last year in points (13.6), rebounds (6.7), blocks (1.9) and assists (1.1) over a career-best 24.2 minutes per game. The Raptors usually started either Aron Baynes or Khem Birch and then brought Boucher in off the bench. This year, Baynes is no longer with Toronto, so Boucher will battle Birch for minutes. Both centers are entering their age-29 season, so neither has an ideal timeline for the rebuilding Raptors. Over the summer, Toronto signed Birch to a three-year deal while Boucher has only one season remaining on his contract. So while the organization might be more committed to Birch, it's Boucher who delivers the gaudier stats. Boucher's 1.9 blocks per contest ranked fifth in the Association and he also drained a surprising 1.5 three-pointers per game last year. While Baynes has departed, Toronto acquired young big Precious Achiuwa in the sign-and-trade deal that sent Kyle Lowry to Miami. The 6-foot-8 Achiuwa will fight for minutes at both the four and the five. With Lowry gone, the Raptors should be looking for points from every position, which could aid Boucher's attempt to score more minutes.
The 2020-21 season was a breakout year for Boucher. After struggling for meaningful minutes during his first three seasons, Boucher delivered per game career highs last year in points (13.6), rebounds (6.7), blocks (1.9) and assists (1.1) over a career-best 24.2 minutes per game. The Raptors usually started either Aron Baynes or Khem Birch and then brought Boucher in off the bench. This year, Baynes is no longer with Toronto, so Boucher will battle Birch for minutes. Both centers are entering their age-29 season, so neither has an ideal timeline for the rebuilding Raptors. Over the summer, Toronto signed Birch to a three-year deal while Boucher has only one season remaining on his contract. So while the organization might be more committed to Birch, it's Boucher who delivers the gaudier stats. Boucher's 1.9 blocks per contest ranked fifth in the Association and he also drained a surprising 1.5 three-pointers per game last year. While Baynes has departed, Toronto acquired young big Precious Achiuwa in the sign-and-trade deal that sent Kyle Lowry to Miami. The 6-foot-8 Achiuwa will fight for minutes at both the four and the five. With Lowry gone, the Raptors should be looking for points from every position, which could aid Boucher's attempt to score more minutes.
GS (F)
G
73
Min
31.9
FPTS
1,224.0
REB
507.0
AST
533.0
STL
108.0
BLK
61.0
TO
194.0
FGM
185.0
FGA
451.0
FTM
86.0
FTA
112.0
After a rough 2019-20 campaign in which he appeared in just 43 games and the Warriors earned just 15 wins, Green had a bounce-back season in 2020-21. He appeared in 63 of the Warriors' 72 regular-season games and averaged 7.0 points, a career-high 8.9 assists, 7.1 rebounds and 2.5 combined steals-plus-blocks. With those numbers, he was able to rank 37th in per-game fantasy production -- quite the jump from his 2019-20 rank of 76th. Green will be turning 32 years old in 2021-22, and while certain parts of his game haven't aged well -- three-point shooting and foul drawing being the main two -- he should continue to be the hub of the Warriors' offense. The return of Klay Thompson will only help Green, as it gives him another elite shooter to pass to, and it should open up the lane for Green to get more easy layups. It seems unlikely Green will return to the form that allowed him to rank as high as 13th in fantasy in 2015-16, but there's a good chance he'll again return third-to-fourth-round value.
After a rough 2019-20 campaign in which he appeared in just 43 games and the Warriors earned just 15 wins, Green had a bounce-back season in 2020-21. He appeared in 63 of the Warriors' 72 regular-season games and averaged 7.0 points, a career-high 8.9 assists, 7.1 rebounds and 2.5 combined steals-plus-blocks. With those numbers, he was able to rank 37th in per-game fantasy production -- quite the jump from his 2019-20 rank of 76th. Green will be turning 32 years old in 2021-22, and while certain parts of his game haven't aged well -- three-point shooting and foul drawing being the main two -- he should continue to be the hub of the Warriors' offense. The return of Klay Thompson will only help Green, as it gives him another elite shooter to pass to, and it should open up the lane for Green to get more easy layups. It seems unlikely Green will return to the form that allowed him to rank as high as 13th in fantasy in 2015-16, but there's a good chance he'll again return third-to-fourth-round value.
MEM (F)
G
65
Min
30.3
FPTS
1,207.0
REB
392.0
AST
75.0
STL
65.0
BLK
118.0
TO
120.0
FGM
402.0
FGA
875.0
FTM
234.0
FTA
279.0
Jackson has struggled staying healthy in his first three years in the league, as he's appeared in just 126 games. However, he's shown intriguing upside. He's a career 37.4 percent three-point shooter and registers a combined 3.1 blocks-plus-steals per 36 minutes. Notably, in 2019-20, he ranked as the 65th-best fantasy player on a per-game basis behind 17.4 points, 4.6 rebounds, 1.4 assists and 1.6 blocks in 28.5 minutes. He should be in position to repeat those numbers this season, and there's reason to believe he'll see more minutes if he stays healthy. For that reason, there will certainly be fantasy managers looking to aggressively target Jackson earlier than the sixth round, banking on the 22-year-old both improving and seeing more minutes on a team that's featuring him as a key rebuilding piece.
Jackson has struggled staying healthy in his first three years in the league, as he's appeared in just 126 games. However, he's shown intriguing upside. He's a career 37.4 percent three-point shooter and registers a combined 3.1 blocks-plus-steals per 36 minutes. Notably, in 2019-20, he ranked as the 65th-best fantasy player on a per-game basis behind 17.4 points, 4.6 rebounds, 1.4 assists and 1.6 blocks in 28.5 minutes. He should be in position to repeat those numbers this season, and there's reason to believe he'll see more minutes if he stays healthy. For that reason, there will certainly be fantasy managers looking to aggressively target Jackson earlier than the sixth round, banking on the 22-year-old both improving and seeing more minutes on a team that's featuring him as a key rebuilding piece.
UTA (G)
G
68
Min
30.2
FPTS
1,200.0
REB
228.0
AST
405.0
STL
87.0
BLK
8.0
TO
139.0
FGM
414.0
FGA
945.0
FTM
168.0
FTA
199.0
After missing most of the playoffs with a hamstring injury, Conley inked a three-year, $72.5 million deal to return to the Jazz. In his second season in Utah, he averaged 16.2 points, 6.0 assists, 3.5 rebounds and 1.4 steals in 29.4 minutes per game. The 33-year-old shot 44.4 percent from the field and a career-high 41.2 percent from three. While the point guard was efficient, he still wasn't as prolific as his time Memphis. Playing second fiddle to Donovan Mitchell, Conley finished 58th in fantasy scoring on a per-game basis -- higher than only his 2015-16 season with the Grizzlies. Jordan Clarkson was incredible last season and will likely garner major minutes as the backup, but his role is well defined and doesn't have a real shot at impacting Conley's bottom line. Injuries remain the primary issue for the 2007 No. 4 overall pick, as he has missed 20-plus games in both of his seasons with Utah. The Jazz post one of the most unselfish -- yet consistent -- offenses in the NBA, and when healthy, Conley will be one of their biggest contributors.
After missing most of the playoffs with a hamstring injury, Conley inked a three-year, $72.5 million deal to return to the Jazz. In his second season in Utah, he averaged 16.2 points, 6.0 assists, 3.5 rebounds and 1.4 steals in 29.4 minutes per game. The 33-year-old shot 44.4 percent from the field and a career-high 41.2 percent from three. While the point guard was efficient, he still wasn't as prolific as his time Memphis. Playing second fiddle to Donovan Mitchell, Conley finished 58th in fantasy scoring on a per-game basis -- higher than only his 2015-16 season with the Grizzlies. Jordan Clarkson was incredible last season and will likely garner major minutes as the backup, but his role is well defined and doesn't have a real shot at impacting Conley's bottom line. Injuries remain the primary issue for the 2007 No. 4 overall pick, as he has missed 20-plus games in both of his seasons with Utah. The Jazz post one of the most unselfish -- yet consistent -- offenses in the NBA, and when healthy, Conley will be one of their biggest contributors.
IND (C)
G
68
Min
30.5
FPTS
1,199.0
REB
463.0
AST
82.0
STL
52.0
BLK
202.0
TO
97.0
FGM
329.0
FGA
704.0
FTM
149.0
FTA
194.0
Turner appeared in just 47 games last season due to a toe injury, but he put together the best year of his career when healthy. He blocked 3.4 shots per game, marking his second time leading the NBA in blocks. He also averaged 12.6 points on a career-best 59.9 true shooting percentage. While his rebounding (6.5) remains low, Turner's overall numbers allowed him to rank 28th in per-game fantasy production -- the best mark of his career by four spots. It doesn't appear that Turner will end up turning into a volume shooter anytime soon, especially with the pieces around him in Indiana. Plus, his rebounding upside is low when sharing the court with Domantas Sabonis. However, he puts up some of the best defensive numbers in the league and provides a solid amount of threes (1.5 makes per game last year) for a center. There's only so much room for the 25-year-old to grow in his current role, but that doesn't mean fantasy managers should be discouraged from drafting him. He's still one of the best fantasy centers out there, and he'll likely be a consistent third to fourth-round selection in most drafts.
Turner appeared in just 47 games last season due to a toe injury, but he put together the best year of his career when healthy. He blocked 3.4 shots per game, marking his second time leading the NBA in blocks. He also averaged 12.6 points on a career-best 59.9 true shooting percentage. While his rebounding (6.5) remains low, Turner's overall numbers allowed him to rank 28th in per-game fantasy production -- the best mark of his career by four spots. It doesn't appear that Turner will end up turning into a volume shooter anytime soon, especially with the pieces around him in Indiana. Plus, his rebounding upside is low when sharing the court with Domantas Sabonis. However, he puts up some of the best defensive numbers in the league and provides a solid amount of threes (1.5 makes per game last year) for a center. There's only so much room for the 25-year-old to grow in his current role, but that doesn't mean fantasy managers should be discouraged from drafting him. He's still one of the best fantasy centers out there, and he'll likely be a consistent third to fourth-round selection in most drafts.
CHI (G)
G
72
Min
32.9
FPTS
1,195.0
REB
329.0
AST
430.0
STL
110.0
BLK
44.0
TO
155.0
FGM
345.0
FGA
827.0
FTM
61.0
FTA
77.0
Putting aside Ball's struggles to stay healthy -- he appeared in 55 games last season and has played in just 217 games in his first four years -- the 2020-21 campaign was his best from a per-game fantasy value perspective. The point guard ranked 46th behind a career-high 14.6 points, 5.7 assists, 4.8 rebounds and 2.1 combined steals-plus-blocks. He also posted a career-high true shooting percentage (55.1) behind splits of 41/38/78. The biggest stride in Ball's game continues to be his three-point shooting. He's increased his efficiency from deep every season, and he drilled 3.1 triples per game last year. During the offseason, he was part of a sign-and-trade to the Bulls, with the 23-year-old inking a four-year, $85 million deal with Chicago. He's now part of a revamped and competitive Bulls team that includes Zach LaVine, DeMar DeRozan and Nikola Vucevic. Ball will be able to take some playmaking responsibilities away from LaVine, and he'll continue to be an off-ball threat as a three-point shooter. Ultimately, fantasy managers shouldn't expect a dramatic statistical change from Ball. He's a relatively passive offensive player who can play floor general in the halfcourt and coordinate fast breaks. He's also one of the best defenders, if not the best defender, on the Bulls. Managers unafraid of Ball's injury history have justification to draft him in the fourth or fifth round, though it might be possible to get him later. If he stays healthy, he'll be a steal after the fifth round.
Putting aside Ball's struggles to stay healthy -- he appeared in 55 games last season and has played in just 217 games in his first four years -- the 2020-21 campaign was his best from a per-game fantasy value perspective. The point guard ranked 46th behind a career-high 14.6 points, 5.7 assists, 4.8 rebounds and 2.1 combined steals-plus-blocks. He also posted a career-high true shooting percentage (55.1) behind splits of 41/38/78. The biggest stride in Ball's game continues to be his three-point shooting. He's increased his efficiency from deep every season, and he drilled 3.1 triples per game last year. During the offseason, he was part of a sign-and-trade to the Bulls, with the 23-year-old inking a four-year, $85 million deal with Chicago. He's now part of a revamped and competitive Bulls team that includes Zach LaVine, DeMar DeRozan and Nikola Vucevic. Ball will be able to take some playmaking responsibilities away from LaVine, and he'll continue to be an off-ball threat as a three-point shooter. Ultimately, fantasy managers shouldn't expect a dramatic statistical change from Ball. He's a relatively passive offensive player who can play floor general in the halfcourt and coordinate fast breaks. He's also one of the best defenders, if not the best defender, on the Bulls. Managers unafraid of Ball's injury history have justification to draft him in the fourth or fifth round, though it might be possible to get him later. If he stays healthy, he'll be a steal after the fifth round.
ORL (C)
G
65
Min
28.9
FPTS
1,194.0
REB
606.0
AST
95.0
STL
49.0
BLK
63.0
TO
108.0
FGM
332.0
FGA
644.0
FTM
170.0
FTA
227.0
Carter has struggled to make meaningful strides in his game since being selected No. 7 overall in the 2018 NBA Draft, and last season was his worst from a fantasy perspective, as the center ranked 146th on a per-game basis after managing a rank of 110th in 2019-20. He spent the first part of the season with Chicago but was dealt to Orlando at the deadline in the trade that sent Nikola Vucevic to the Bulls. He did manage to have one of the best stretches of his career while with the Magic, however. In 11 games to start April, he averaged 15.4 points on 56.2 percent shooting, 9.2 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 2.1 combined steals-plus-blocks. That said, plenty of players have great 10-game stretches, and Carter hasn't shown us many of the things scouts praised him for, including playmaking ability and three-point potential. He's averaged just 2.2 assists per 36 minutes for his career, and he's a woeful 27-for-112 (24.1 percent) from distance. He's even been rough from the mid-range, with Carter shooting just 60-of-161 (37.3 percent) on non-paint two-pointers. With Orlando in the midst of a rebuild, Carter will continue having opportunities to expand his game and be a part of the offense. However, he'll also be competing for minutes with another member of his draft class, Mo Bamba, who needs developmental time as well. Bamba has been more of a disappointment than Carter, but the organization needs to figure out sooner than later if either player is worth investing in. As a result, Carter is one of the more intriguing high-risk options in the late rounds of drafts this season. If he can truly establish himself as a better option than Bamba, Carter should be in line for 30-plus minutes consistently. If that's the case, he would be en route to finish inside the top 100.
Carter has struggled to make meaningful strides in his game since being selected No. 7 overall in the 2018 NBA Draft, and last season was his worst from a fantasy perspective, as the center ranked 146th on a per-game basis after managing a rank of 110th in 2019-20. He spent the first part of the season with Chicago but was dealt to Orlando at the deadline in the trade that sent Nikola Vucevic to the Bulls. He did manage to have one of the best stretches of his career while with the Magic, however. In 11 games to start April, he averaged 15.4 points on 56.2 percent shooting, 9.2 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 2.1 combined steals-plus-blocks. That said, plenty of players have great 10-game stretches, and Carter hasn't shown us many of the things scouts praised him for, including playmaking ability and three-point potential. He's averaged just 2.2 assists per 36 minutes for his career, and he's a woeful 27-for-112 (24.1 percent) from distance. He's even been rough from the mid-range, with Carter shooting just 60-of-161 (37.3 percent) on non-paint two-pointers. With Orlando in the midst of a rebuild, Carter will continue having opportunities to expand his game and be a part of the offense. However, he'll also be competing for minutes with another member of his draft class, Mo Bamba, who needs developmental time as well. Bamba has been more of a disappointment than Carter, but the organization needs to figure out sooner than later if either player is worth investing in. As a result, Carter is one of the more intriguing high-risk options in the late rounds of drafts this season. If he can truly establish himself as a better option than Bamba, Carter should be in line for 30-plus minutes consistently. If that's the case, he would be en route to finish inside the top 100.
DET (C)
G
76
Min
27.0
FPTS
1,190.0
REB
478.0
AST
199.0
STL
68.0
BLK
40.0
TO
137.0
FGM
325.0
FGA
684.0
FTM
154.0
FTA
188.0
Olynyk was on his way to a typical season with the Heat -- 10.0 points, 6.1 rebounds, 2.1 assists in 26.9 minutes -- until he was dealt to the Rockets in the trade that landed Victor Oladipo in Miami. Once in Houston, Olynyk was given a starting job and the biggest role of his career for his final 27 appearances. In 31.1 minutes per game, he averaged 19.0 points on 55/39/84 shooting, 8.4 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 1.4 steals. Notably, against the 76ers, he posted a 27-point, 11-rebound, 8-assist, 3-block, 1-steal game. After making his debut for the Rockets on March 27, Olynyk was the fifth-best player in fantasy in terms of total production -- an absolutely shocking number that made him the best late-season pickup. Olynyk doesn't figure to have quite that level of production in 2021-22. In the offseason, he signed a three-year, $37 million contract with the Pistons. It's not immediately clear if Olynyk will start or come off the bench, but there's a chance he sees minutes in the upper-20s. If that's the case and coach Dwane Casey trusts Olynyk to handle the ball even close to what he saw in Houston, the big man should finish inside the top 100. Olynyk has proven capable of that in the past. In 2017-18, he saw just 23.4 minutes per game and ranked 95th, and he ranked 64th last season in 28.5 minutes. Drafting him in the sixth round would be aggressive, but optimistic fantasy managers have reason to explore drafting him after that.
Olynyk was on his way to a typical season with the Heat -- 10.0 points, 6.1 rebounds, 2.1 assists in 26.9 minutes -- until he was dealt to the Rockets in the trade that landed Victor Oladipo in Miami. Once in Houston, Olynyk was given a starting job and the biggest role of his career for his final 27 appearances. In 31.1 minutes per game, he averaged 19.0 points on 55/39/84 shooting, 8.4 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 1.4 steals. Notably, against the 76ers, he posted a 27-point, 11-rebound, 8-assist, 3-block, 1-steal game. After making his debut for the Rockets on March 27, Olynyk was the fifth-best player in fantasy in terms of total production -- an absolutely shocking number that made him the best late-season pickup. Olynyk doesn't figure to have quite that level of production in 2021-22. In the offseason, he signed a three-year, $37 million contract with the Pistons. It's not immediately clear if Olynyk will start or come off the bench, but there's a chance he sees minutes in the upper-20s. If that's the case and coach Dwane Casey trusts Olynyk to handle the ball even close to what he saw in Houston, the big man should finish inside the top 100. Olynyk has proven capable of that in the past. In 2017-18, he saw just 23.4 minutes per game and ranked 95th, and he ranked 64th last season in 28.5 minutes. Drafting him in the sixth round would be aggressive, but optimistic fantasy managers have reason to explore drafting him after that.
DET (C)
G
70
Min
24.9
FPTS
1,188.0
REB
540.0
AST
49.0
STL
37.0
BLK
102.0
TO
74.0
FGM
344.0
FGA
591.0
FTM
85.0
FTA
119.0
The 16th overall pick in the 2020 draft, Stewart made steady progress throughout his rookie season and worked himself into fantasy relevance. While he only ended up ranking 153rd in per-game fantasy production on the season, he ranked 104th from March 11 onward and 80th from April 8 onward. The center started 11 of his final 19 appearances, and during that span, he averaged 11.5 points, 8.8 rebounds, 1.8 blocks and 1.1 assists in 26.5 minutes. He also shot a nice 53.9 percent from the field and a passable-for-a-center 70.0 percent from the charity stripe. Despite standing just 6-foot-8, Stewart was able to rank 17th in the NBA in total rebound percentage (17.3) and eighth in block percentage (5.2). Even as a low-usage offensive player, those two stats alone suggest Stewart has the potential to be a great fantasy asset. Heading into 2021-22, the Pistons sent Mason Plumlee packing to Charlotte but brought in Kelly Olynyk. That complicates Stewart's path to a consistent 30 minutes per night, but Olynyk is also capable of playing power forward and pushing Jerami Grant down to small forward. And considering Detroit's status as a rebuild, Stewart's minutes should be an organizational priority. Given that he showed clear upside to rank inside the top 80 in just 26.5 minutes per game, fantasy managers have justification to draft him around that mark.
The 16th overall pick in the 2020 draft, Stewart made steady progress throughout his rookie season and worked himself into fantasy relevance. While he only ended up ranking 153rd in per-game fantasy production on the season, he ranked 104th from March 11 onward and 80th from April 8 onward. The center started 11 of his final 19 appearances, and during that span, he averaged 11.5 points, 8.8 rebounds, 1.8 blocks and 1.1 assists in 26.5 minutes. He also shot a nice 53.9 percent from the field and a passable-for-a-center 70.0 percent from the charity stripe. Despite standing just 6-foot-8, Stewart was able to rank 17th in the NBA in total rebound percentage (17.3) and eighth in block percentage (5.2). Even as a low-usage offensive player, those two stats alone suggest Stewart has the potential to be a great fantasy asset. Heading into 2021-22, the Pistons sent Mason Plumlee packing to Charlotte but brought in Kelly Olynyk. That complicates Stewart's path to a consistent 30 minutes per night, but Olynyk is also capable of playing power forward and pushing Jerami Grant down to small forward. And considering Detroit's status as a rebuild, Stewart's minutes should be an organizational priority. Given that he showed clear upside to rank inside the top 80 in just 26.5 minutes per game, fantasy managers have justification to draft him around that mark.
NY (C)
G
66
Min
25.8
FPTS
1,188.0
REB
516.0
AST
43.0
STL
64.0
BLK
109.0
TO
45.0
FGM
312.0
FGA
450.0
FTM
71.0
FTA
127.0
Many expected the 2020-21 season to be Mitchell Robinson's breakout year. Unfortunately, nagging injuries resulted in Robinson appearing in only 31 of New York's 79 regular season and playoff games, despite starting the Knicks' first 27 contests. The big center was productive in those first 27 starts, averaging 8.4 points, 8.4 rebounds and 1.5 blocks per game. That said, those scoring and block numbers were actually down versus 2019-20, but he did have a spike in boards. Coach Tom Thibodeau's defensive scheme prefers centers to stay focused on the rim and not sell out for the glamorous block. That approach certainly helped New York's defensive and rebounding efforts, but Robinson's 1.5 blocks per game were a far cry from the 2.4 he swatted as a rookie in 2018-19. Robinson's 27 game streak ended in mid-February when he fractured his right hand, which resulted in surgery. He returned for four games in late March, but then broke a bone in his right foot, which also led to surgery and forced Robinson's absence for the rest of the season. With Robinson out, backup Nerlens Noel played 27.6 minutes per game and averaged 5.9 points, 7.0 boards and 2.3 blocks per game, good enough for New York to re-sign Noel to a three-year deal. The signing was important, since it is currently unknown when Robinson can return to action in 2021-22. In late May, Thibodeau reported that Robinson was "several steps away" from a return.
Many expected the 2020-21 season to be Mitchell Robinson's breakout year. Unfortunately, nagging injuries resulted in Robinson appearing in only 31 of New York's 79 regular season and playoff games, despite starting the Knicks' first 27 contests. The big center was productive in those first 27 starts, averaging 8.4 points, 8.4 rebounds and 1.5 blocks per game. That said, those scoring and block numbers were actually down versus 2019-20, but he did have a spike in boards. Coach Tom Thibodeau's defensive scheme prefers centers to stay focused on the rim and not sell out for the glamorous block. That approach certainly helped New York's defensive and rebounding efforts, but Robinson's 1.5 blocks per game were a far cry from the 2.4 he swatted as a rookie in 2018-19. Robinson's 27 game streak ended in mid-February when he fractured his right hand, which resulted in surgery. He returned for four games in late March, but then broke a bone in his right foot, which also led to surgery and forced Robinson's absence for the rest of the season. With Robinson out, backup Nerlens Noel played 27.6 minutes per game and averaged 5.9 points, 7.0 boards and 2.3 blocks per game, good enough for New York to re-sign Noel to a three-year deal. The signing was important, since it is currently unknown when Robinson can return to action in 2021-22. In late May, Thibodeau reported that Robinson was "several steps away" from a return.
CHR (F)
G
73
Min
30.7
FPTS
1,188.0
REB
470.0
AST
157.0
STL
78.0
BLK
92.0
TO
118.0
FGM
361.0
FGA
782.0
FTM
128.0
FTA
173.0
Washington made marginal improvements from his rookie to sophomore season. It wasn't a significant jump, though it was enough for him to go from 141st in per-game production as a rookie to 79th last year. The 6-foot-7 power forward and small-ball center saw 30.5 minutes per game and averaged 12.9 points, 6.5 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 2.3 combined blocks-plus-steals. He ranked an impressive 14th in the NBA in block percentage (4.0). He's quietly establishing himself as a quality three-and-D option in the frontcourt. He'll also often be at the receiving end of easy makes around the basket by virtue of having LaMelo Ball as his point guard, which should keep Washington's field-goal percentage relatively high compared to the percentage of his shots that come from beyond the arc (39%). He shot 44.0 percent from the field last year. Washington's role shouldn't change much in 2021-22. The addition of Kelly Oubre could make the rotation at forward a little more complicated, but Washington should essentially be locked into 24 minutes per game at center, splitting time with Mason Plumlee.
Washington made marginal improvements from his rookie to sophomore season. It wasn't a significant jump, though it was enough for him to go from 141st in per-game production as a rookie to 79th last year. The 6-foot-7 power forward and small-ball center saw 30.5 minutes per game and averaged 12.9 points, 6.5 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 2.3 combined blocks-plus-steals. He ranked an impressive 14th in the NBA in block percentage (4.0). He's quietly establishing himself as a quality three-and-D option in the frontcourt. He'll also often be at the receiving end of easy makes around the basket by virtue of having LaMelo Ball as his point guard, which should keep Washington's field-goal percentage relatively high compared to the percentage of his shots that come from beyond the arc (39%). He shot 44.0 percent from the field last year. Washington's role shouldn't change much in 2021-22. The addition of Kelly Oubre could make the rotation at forward a little more complicated, but Washington should essentially be locked into 24 minutes per game at center, splitting time with Mason Plumlee.
SAN (C)
G
66
Min
27.6
FPTS
1,187.0
REB
584.0
AST
144.0
STL
58.0
BLK
111.0
TO
84.0
FGM
262.0
FGA
414.0
FTM
68.0
FTA
134.0
Poeltl is coming off the best season of his five-year career in The Association, as the big man posted career-best marks in most categories. He averaged a career-high 26.7 minutes per game, which translated into personal bests in points (8.6), rebounds (7.9), assists (1.9), blocks (1.8) and steals (0.7). The veteran big man recorded 16 double-doubles last season and all but one of those came as a starter. Poeltl might be in line for his best season yet if he manages to stay healthy as the Spurs' starting center. Poeltl might not have a lot of upside in standard leagues, but he could be a decent option as a late pick because he can contribute with rebounds and blocks while also offering double-digit scoring outputs on a semi-consistent basis. While he's not expected to become a regular offensive force in the Spurs' scheme, the fact that he has shot at least 60 percent from the field in each of his last four seasons bodes well for his chances of being efficient on limited touches.
Poeltl is coming off the best season of his five-year career in The Association, as the big man posted career-best marks in most categories. He averaged a career-high 26.7 minutes per game, which translated into personal bests in points (8.6), rebounds (7.9), assists (1.9), blocks (1.8) and steals (0.7). The veteran big man recorded 16 double-doubles last season and all but one of those came as a starter. Poeltl might be in line for his best season yet if he manages to stay healthy as the Spurs' starting center. Poeltl might not have a lot of upside in standard leagues, but he could be a decent option as a late pick because he can contribute with rebounds and blocks while also offering double-digit scoring outputs on a semi-consistent basis. While he's not expected to become a regular offensive force in the Spurs' scheme, the fact that he has shot at least 60 percent from the field in each of his last four seasons bodes well for his chances of being efficient on limited touches.
MEM (C)
G
71
Min
27.6
FPTS
1,178.0
REB
620.0
AST
133.0
STL
69.0
BLK
78.0
TO
109.0
FGM
288.0
FGA
478.0
FTM
99.0
FTA
198.0
After seven seasons with the Thunder, the team that drafted him, Adams was dealt to the Pelicans last season. He continued to start but saw a reduced offensive role alongside the likes of Zion Williamson and Brandon Ingram. Adams garnered 27.7 minutes per game and averaged 7.6 points, 8.9 rebounds, 1.9 assists and a combined 1.6 steals-plus-blocks. The result was Adams' worst fantasy season since 2014-15, with the center ranking 187th in per-game production. The 28-year-old will join another new team this season, as he was dealt from New Orleans to Memphis over the summer in exchange for, most meaningfully, Jonas Valanciunas. Adams will presumably start at center for the Grizzlies, where he should play the same role he always has -- being a devastating screen setter and a premier offensive rebounder. It's possible Adams reclaims some fantasy value since the team construction around him makes more sense with floor-spacing power forward in Jaren Jackson rather than Zion Williamson. Fantasy managers' main hope should be that Adams can start playing 30-plus minutes per game again compared to the 27.1 minutes he's averaged over the past two seasons. It may also help Adams to have a more dynamic point guard to run the pick-and-roll with in Ja Morant compared to Lonzo Ball last season. Optimistic fantasy managers can justifiably select Adams in the late rounds of a standard draft but shouldn't feel like he's a must-roster if he starts the season slowly.
After seven seasons with the Thunder, the team that drafted him, Adams was dealt to the Pelicans last season. He continued to start but saw a reduced offensive role alongside the likes of Zion Williamson and Brandon Ingram. Adams garnered 27.7 minutes per game and averaged 7.6 points, 8.9 rebounds, 1.9 assists and a combined 1.6 steals-plus-blocks. The result was Adams' worst fantasy season since 2014-15, with the center ranking 187th in per-game production. The 28-year-old will join another new team this season, as he was dealt from New Orleans to Memphis over the summer in exchange for, most meaningfully, Jonas Valanciunas. Adams will presumably start at center for the Grizzlies, where he should play the same role he always has -- being a devastating screen setter and a premier offensive rebounder. It's possible Adams reclaims some fantasy value since the team construction around him makes more sense with floor-spacing power forward in Jaren Jackson rather than Zion Williamson. Fantasy managers' main hope should be that Adams can start playing 30-plus minutes per game again compared to the 27.1 minutes he's averaged over the past two seasons. It may also help Adams to have a more dynamic point guard to run the pick-and-roll with in Ja Morant compared to Lonzo Ball last season. Optimistic fantasy managers can justifiably select Adams in the late rounds of a standard draft but shouldn't feel like he's a must-roster if he starts the season slowly.
MIA (G)
G
75
Min
30.5
FPTS
1,171.0
REB
408.0
AST
242.0
STL
33.0
BLK
14.0
TO
130.0
FGM
439.0
FGA
991.0
FTM
142.0
FTA
170.0
After an impressive playoff run in the bubble during the 2020 playoffs as a rookie, Herro was viewed as having plenty of upside as a sophomore last season. While he did improve, it wasn't the leap forward that fantasy managers expected. Herro ranked 131st in per-game production last season behind 15.1 points, 5.0 rebounds and 3.4 assists in 30.3 minutes. There are encouraging signs of growth if you know where to look. He decreased his mid-range jumpers, replacing them with more shots at the rim, and he improved as a finisher at the basket. He also increased his vision significantly, jumping from 3.9 assists per 100 possessions to 5.6 assists per 100 possessions while keeping his turnovers nearly stagnant. Heading into 2021-22, Herro should practically be locked into minutes in the high-20s, and he should continue to occupy a sixth-man role. However, there are conflicting factors when considering Herro's potential production. He's 21 years old, has stepped up in the postseason and is making improvements. But, the Heat got significantly better in the offseason -- adding Kyle Lowry and retaining Victor Oladipo -- meaning Herro won't need to score 15 points every night for the Heat to win. He's someone that fantasy managers in dynasty leagues should feel good about long-term, but Herro might not be a great option this season. It's fair to expect him to be drafted inside the top 100, but that's far from a guarantee to pay off.
After an impressive playoff run in the bubble during the 2020 playoffs as a rookie, Herro was viewed as having plenty of upside as a sophomore last season. While he did improve, it wasn't the leap forward that fantasy managers expected. Herro ranked 131st in per-game production last season behind 15.1 points, 5.0 rebounds and 3.4 assists in 30.3 minutes. There are encouraging signs of growth if you know where to look. He decreased his mid-range jumpers, replacing them with more shots at the rim, and he improved as a finisher at the basket. He also increased his vision significantly, jumping from 3.9 assists per 100 possessions to 5.6 assists per 100 possessions while keeping his turnovers nearly stagnant. Heading into 2021-22, Herro should practically be locked into minutes in the high-20s, and he should continue to occupy a sixth-man role. However, there are conflicting factors when considering Herro's potential production. He's 21 years old, has stepped up in the postseason and is making improvements. But, the Heat got significantly better in the offseason -- adding Kyle Lowry and retaining Victor Oladipo -- meaning Herro won't need to score 15 points every night for the Heat to win. He's someone that fantasy managers in dynasty leagues should feel good about long-term, but Herro might not be a great option this season. It's fair to expect him to be drafted inside the top 100, but that's far from a guarantee to pay off.
SAN (G)
G
67
Min
30.3
FPTS
1,156.0
REB
270.0
AST
292.0
STL
53.0
BLK
71.0
TO
108.0
FGM
350.0
FGA
818.0
FTM
238.0
FTA
276.0
White might be the player that benefits the most from DeMar DeRozan's departure to the Heat, as he suddenly finds himself in a position to be one of the alpha dogs on the Spurs offense. He's coming off a strong 2020-21 season that saw him deliver career-best figures in both points (15.4) and three-pointers made (2.3) per game. The fifth-year pro out of Colorado is not the most efficient scorer out there, and his field goal percentage has been trending in the wrong direction ever since he started his NBA career, so he will probably need a lot of volume to become a reliable scoring threat. Fortunately for him, the Spurs now have a big hole on offense following DeRozan's departure, and White showed enough improvement as a player last season to believe he can be an effective replacement, or at least mitigate some of the impact caused by the departure of DeRozan. While fantasy owners should be cautious when drafting White, he should be a good enough scorer to be a mid-round selection, especially considering he can also bring other things to the table such as passing (has dished out at least three dimes per game in each of the last three seasons) and defense (combined 1.7 blocks and steals per game in 2020-21). He might not be ready to become a star in the league just yet, but he should a more-than-serviceable fantasy asset.
White might be the player that benefits the most from DeMar DeRozan's departure to the Heat, as he suddenly finds himself in a position to be one of the alpha dogs on the Spurs offense. He's coming off a strong 2020-21 season that saw him deliver career-best figures in both points (15.4) and three-pointers made (2.3) per game. The fifth-year pro out of Colorado is not the most efficient scorer out there, and his field goal percentage has been trending in the wrong direction ever since he started his NBA career, so he will probably need a lot of volume to become a reliable scoring threat. Fortunately for him, the Spurs now have a big hole on offense following DeRozan's departure, and White showed enough improvement as a player last season to believe he can be an effective replacement, or at least mitigate some of the impact caused by the departure of DeRozan. While fantasy owners should be cautious when drafting White, he should be a good enough scorer to be a mid-round selection, especially considering he can also bring other things to the table such as passing (has dished out at least three dimes per game in each of the last three seasons) and defense (combined 1.7 blocks and steals per game in 2020-21). He might not be ready to become a star in the league just yet, but he should a more-than-serviceable fantasy asset.
MIN (G)
G
66
Min
32.5
FPTS
1,154.0
REB
240.0
AST
400.0
STL
71.0
BLK
19.0
TO
217.0
FGM
428.0
FGA
999.0
FTM
199.0
FTA
253.0
Russell's first full season in Minnesota did not go as planned, as injuries limited the guard to just 42 total appearances and 28.5 minutes per game -- his fewest since his rookie year with the Lakers in 2015-16. Bad luck seems to strike the Timberwolves on an annual basis, but heading into 2021-22, the pieces are in place for Russell and company to finally take a step forward. With Ricky Rubio out of the way, Russell should return to handling a larger workload, though he'll have to contend with a trio of high-usage players in Karl-Anthony Towns, Anthony Edwards and Malik Beasley for touches. The Wolves also added veteran Patrick Beverley via trade in August. Still, Russell should have a good chance to bounce back and return to being a 20-point-per-game scorer who adds assists and high-volume threes. Russell has averaged at least 2.9 made threes per game in each of the last three seasons, and he's notched at least one steal per game in five of his six NBA campaigns. The potential for missed time must be factored into Russell's evaluation, however, as he's played fewer than 50 games in three of the last four seasons.
Russell's first full season in Minnesota did not go as planned, as injuries limited the guard to just 42 total appearances and 28.5 minutes per game -- his fewest since his rookie year with the Lakers in 2015-16. Bad luck seems to strike the Timberwolves on an annual basis, but heading into 2021-22, the pieces are in place for Russell and company to finally take a step forward. With Ricky Rubio out of the way, Russell should return to handling a larger workload, though he'll have to contend with a trio of high-usage players in Karl-Anthony Towns, Anthony Edwards and Malik Beasley for touches. The Wolves also added veteran Patrick Beverley via trade in August. Still, Russell should have a good chance to bounce back and return to being a 20-point-per-game scorer who adds assists and high-volume threes. Russell has averaged at least 2.9 made threes per game in each of the last three seasons, and he's notched at least one steal per game in five of his six NBA campaigns. The potential for missed time must be factored into Russell's evaluation, however, as he's played fewer than 50 games in three of the last four seasons.
WAS (C)
G
75
Min
22.0
FPTS
1,147.0
REB
469.0
AST
84.0
STL
37.0
BLK
68.0
TO
102.0
FGM
363.0
FGA
588.0
FTM
169.0
FTA
248.0
After a strong 2019-20 season when Harrell won the NBA's Sixth Man of the Year award with the Clippers, the big man was dealt a minimal role with the Lakers last season, especially once Los Angeles acquired Andre Drummond mid-season. Harrel saw his minutes, points, rebounds, assists and blocks all take a hit in his one-year stint with the Lakers. The 27-year-old did, however, became a more efficient scorer, as both his percentage from the field and charity stripe improved. This season, Harrell will play alongside Bradley Beal in Washington following his sign-and-trade from the Lakers. Although Harrell will be joining a team without many scoring threats, the Lousiville product will need to fight hard for minutes, as he'll be competing with Thomas Bryant and Daniel Gafford for playing time. Harrell will still likely log at least 15 minutes a game and should be able to snag plenty of steals and blocks. With Harrell's role unknown as of now, drafting the center definitely comes with some risk. The upside, however, could be that Harrell takes over the Wizards' starting center position and he reclaims a spot inside the top 100. His best season in fantasy was 2018-19, when he ranked 74th in per-game production in 26.3 minutes.
After a strong 2019-20 season when Harrell won the NBA's Sixth Man of the Year award with the Clippers, the big man was dealt a minimal role with the Lakers last season, especially once Los Angeles acquired Andre Drummond mid-season. Harrel saw his minutes, points, rebounds, assists and blocks all take a hit in his one-year stint with the Lakers. The 27-year-old did, however, became a more efficient scorer, as both his percentage from the field and charity stripe improved. This season, Harrell will play alongside Bradley Beal in Washington following his sign-and-trade from the Lakers. Although Harrell will be joining a team without many scoring threats, the Lousiville product will need to fight hard for minutes, as he'll be competing with Thomas Bryant and Daniel Gafford for playing time. Harrell will still likely log at least 15 minutes a game and should be able to snag plenty of steals and blocks. With Harrell's role unknown as of now, drafting the center definitely comes with some risk. The upside, however, could be that Harrell takes over the Wizards' starting center position and he reclaims a spot inside the top 100. His best season in fantasy was 2018-19, when he ranked 74th in per-game production in 26.3 minutes.
DEN (F)
G
75
Min
29.6
FPTS
1,145.0
REB
412.0
AST
207.0
STL
56.0
BLK
58.0
TO
110.0
FGM
399.0
FGA
831.0
FTM
158.0
FTA
224.0
After starting last season in Orlando, averaging 14.6 points, 6.6 rebounds and 4.2 assists per game, Gordon was dealt to the Nuggets at the trade deadline. The high-flying forward's numbers took a dip in Denver. His averages dropped to 10.2 points, 4.7 rebounds, and 2.2 assists in his 25 appearances with the team. While the 25-year-old is still a talented young player, his role quickly changed as he swapped teams, going from a necessary scoring piece in Orlando to being the third or fourth option in Denver. Even after losing star Jamal Murray to his ACL injury, Gordon's role in the offense did not change, as he averaged 10.1 points per game in the contests after Murray went down. Entering the season, there is hope that Gordon can take the next step in his offensive game, but it may be unlikely due to the circumstances of the team. Last season's MVP Nikola Jokic and his league-leading 101.1 touches per game will still be the focal point of the offense, and budding star Michael Porter Jr. will be the No. 2 option until Murray is back healthy. To make matters worse for the Arizona product, the team signed Jeff Green to a two-year deal while also retaining forward Will Barton, and young players like Bol Bol or Zeke Nnaji are also in the mix for playing time as well. While Gordon is still an impactful player for the Nuggets, it is hard to envision a big fantasy season out of the 6-foot-9 big due to his lack of a complete offensive game, highlighted by his shaky three-point shooting, and Denver's impressive depth.
After starting last season in Orlando, averaging 14.6 points, 6.6 rebounds and 4.2 assists per game, Gordon was dealt to the Nuggets at the trade deadline. The high-flying forward's numbers took a dip in Denver. His averages dropped to 10.2 points, 4.7 rebounds, and 2.2 assists in his 25 appearances with the team. While the 25-year-old is still a talented young player, his role quickly changed as he swapped teams, going from a necessary scoring piece in Orlando to being the third or fourth option in Denver. Even after losing star Jamal Murray to his ACL injury, Gordon's role in the offense did not change, as he averaged 10.1 points per game in the contests after Murray went down. Entering the season, there is hope that Gordon can take the next step in his offensive game, but it may be unlikely due to the circumstances of the team. Last season's MVP Nikola Jokic and his league-leading 101.1 touches per game will still be the focal point of the offense, and budding star Michael Porter Jr. will be the No. 2 option until Murray is back healthy. To make matters worse for the Arizona product, the team signed Jeff Green to a two-year deal while also retaining forward Will Barton, and young players like Bol Bol or Zeke Nnaji are also in the mix for playing time as well. While Gordon is still an impactful player for the Nuggets, it is hard to envision a big fantasy season out of the 6-foot-9 big due to his lack of a complete offensive game, highlighted by his shaky three-point shooting, and Denver's impressive depth.
BOS (C)
G
69
Min
21.5
FPTS
1,142.0
REB
489.0
AST
108.0
STL
63.0
BLK
137.0
TO
80.0
FGM
244.0
FGA
336.0
FTM
67.0
FTA
105.0
For the first time in his career, Williams enters the 2021-22 season with the chance to lead the team in center minutes. The three-year veteran has fought through maturity issues and nagging injuries to finally, hopefully, dominate the key for Boston. Williams flashed brief displays of brilliance in 2020-21. For instance, in early April, he posted 20 points, nine boards, eight dimes and two blocks in a win over woeful Houston. In Game 1 of the playoffs versus the Nets, Williams delivered 11 points, nine boards and nine eye-popping blocks. His per-36-minutes line last season was 15.2 points, 13.1 boards and 3.3 blocks. The Celtics would be very happy to receive a hearty fraction of that production. With Daniel Theis in Chicago and Tristan Thompson in Sacramento, the starting center spot is wide open. Sure, Boston brought back 35-year-old Al Horford. But after rough stints in Philly and OKC, it's possible he Big Al will be happy to be a mentor. At his presser this summer, Horford said about Williams "I'm going to be in his ear, and we are going to be figuring things out together." The main thing holding Williams back is his health. Injuries forced the big center to play in only 32 games his rookie year, 29 games in 2019-20 and 52 of 72 games in 2020-21. If Williams can avoid the injury bug, he should experience a break out season in 2021-22.
For the first time in his career, Williams enters the 2021-22 season with the chance to lead the team in center minutes. The three-year veteran has fought through maturity issues and nagging injuries to finally, hopefully, dominate the key for Boston. Williams flashed brief displays of brilliance in 2020-21. For instance, in early April, he posted 20 points, nine boards, eight dimes and two blocks in a win over woeful Houston. In Game 1 of the playoffs versus the Nets, Williams delivered 11 points, nine boards and nine eye-popping blocks. His per-36-minutes line last season was 15.2 points, 13.1 boards and 3.3 blocks. The Celtics would be very happy to receive a hearty fraction of that production. With Daniel Theis in Chicago and Tristan Thompson in Sacramento, the starting center spot is wide open. Sure, Boston brought back 35-year-old Al Horford. But after rough stints in Philly and OKC, it's possible he Big Al will be happy to be a mentor. At his presser this summer, Horford said about Williams "I'm going to be in his ear, and we are going to be figuring things out together." The main thing holding Williams back is his health. Injuries forced the big center to play in only 32 games his rookie year, 29 games in 2019-20 and 52 of 72 games in 2020-21. If Williams can avoid the injury bug, he should experience a break out season in 2021-22.
UTA (G)
G
77
Min
26.6
FPTS
1,142.0
REB
286.0
AST
174.0
STL
68.0
BLK
19.0
TO
117.0
FGM
517.0
FGA
1,205.0
FTM
156.0
FTA
178.0
The reigning Sixth Man of the Year is coming off a career year for the Jazz, who posted the league's best regular-season record in 2020-21. In 26.7 minutes per game, Clarkson averaged a career-best 18.4 points per game to go with 4.0 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 0.9 steals. As a shoot-first guard who launched 8.8 three-pointers per game, Clarkson's efficiency (42.5% FG) leaves something to be desired, but he provided just enough offense to sneak into the top 100 in eight-category leagues last season. Factoring in Clarkson's durability -- he's missed just seven total games over the last five seasons -- he'll warrant targeting in the later rounds of most standard-league drafts. Utah returns essentially the same roster as last season, so Clarkson's role should remain mostly unchanged. If veteran starter Mike Conley, who's missed 20-plus games in three of the last four seasons, continues to be hit by injuries, Clarkson's value would only rise.
The reigning Sixth Man of the Year is coming off a career year for the Jazz, who posted the league's best regular-season record in 2020-21. In 26.7 minutes per game, Clarkson averaged a career-best 18.4 points per game to go with 4.0 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 0.9 steals. As a shoot-first guard who launched 8.8 three-pointers per game, Clarkson's efficiency (42.5% FG) leaves something to be desired, but he provided just enough offense to sneak into the top 100 in eight-category leagues last season. Factoring in Clarkson's durability -- he's missed just seven total games over the last five seasons -- he'll warrant targeting in the later rounds of most standard-league drafts. Utah returns essentially the same roster as last season, so Clarkson's role should remain mostly unchanged. If veteran starter Mike Conley, who's missed 20-plus games in three of the last four seasons, continues to be hit by injuries, Clarkson's value would only rise.
POR (F)
G
77
Min
32.5
FPTS
1,137.0
REB
517.0
AST
128.0
STL
108.0
BLK
109.0
TO
121.0
FGM
273.0
FGA
639.0
FTM
77.0
FTA
95.0
Covington had a disastrous start to the 2020-21 season with his new team -- the Blazers. In December and January, he shot just 31.6 percent from the field and 28.0 percent from three. However, he was eventually able to pick things back up and finished out the year well. From February onward, he shot 42.5 percent from the field and 40.9 percent from three, also contributing an impressive 2.8 combined steals-plus-blocks per game. Despite the slow start, Covington was still able to finish 75th in per-game fantasy production. While that's far from awful, it was his worst finish since he was a sophomore in 2014-15. Assuming Covington can start off the 2021-22 season on a better note, he should be able to finish with a better rank. From 2015-16 through 2019-20, Covington's average fantasy rank was 42.2. Covington is 30 years old, so he clearly still has the potential to bounce back. Optimistic fantasy managers could draft him in the fourth round hoping for a return to form, but it seems likely he can be had at least one round later given his disappointing 2020-21 season.
Covington had a disastrous start to the 2020-21 season with his new team -- the Blazers. In December and January, he shot just 31.6 percent from the field and 28.0 percent from three. However, he was eventually able to pick things back up and finished out the year well. From February onward, he shot 42.5 percent from the field and 40.9 percent from three, also contributing an impressive 2.8 combined steals-plus-blocks per game. Despite the slow start, Covington was still able to finish 75th in per-game fantasy production. While that's far from awful, it was his worst finish since he was a sophomore in 2014-15. Assuming Covington can start off the 2021-22 season on a better note, he should be able to finish with a better rank. From 2015-16 through 2019-20, Covington's average fantasy rank was 42.2. Covington is 30 years old, so he clearly still has the potential to bounce back. Optimistic fantasy managers could draft him in the fourth round hoping for a return to form, but it seems likely he can be had at least one round later given his disappointing 2020-21 season.
WAS (G)
G
68
Min
32.9
FPTS
1,126.0
REB
248.0
AST
406.0
STL
45.0
BLK
24.0
TO
195.0
FGM
416.0
FGA
1,009.0
FTM
296.0
FTA
366.0
Dinwiddie had high hopes coming into the 2020-21 season after his best season during the 2019-20 campaign. A serious knee injury three games into the 2020-21 season forced the guard to miss the remainder of the year. By the start of the 2021-22 season, Dinwiddie will have had almost 10 full months of rehab for his knee, so the guard will likely be at full health. In his last full season, the 28-year-old finished the year with 20.6 points, 6.8 assists and 3.5 rebounds in 64 games. This season, expectations will be high for Dinwiddie, as he joined the Wizards and is expected to be their starting point guard. The former Colorado star will play alongside one of the league's best scorers in Bradley Beal, which could help boost his assists. The Wizards also lack a number two scoring option behind Beal, so Dinwiddie could pick up that role. Dinwiddie will fill a crucial hole for the Wizards, but it's hard to gauge where the guard should be drafted, as he's coming off a serious injury and is joining a new team. Ultimately, given his situation in Washington, Dinwiddie should see plenty of production as the starting point guard for a revamped Wizards team.
Dinwiddie had high hopes coming into the 2020-21 season after his best season during the 2019-20 campaign. A serious knee injury three games into the 2020-21 season forced the guard to miss the remainder of the year. By the start of the 2021-22 season, Dinwiddie will have had almost 10 full months of rehab for his knee, so the guard will likely be at full health. In his last full season, the 28-year-old finished the year with 20.6 points, 6.8 assists and 3.5 rebounds in 64 games. This season, expectations will be high for Dinwiddie, as he joined the Wizards and is expected to be their starting point guard. The former Colorado star will play alongside one of the league's best scorers in Bradley Beal, which could help boost his assists. The Wizards also lack a number two scoring option behind Beal, so Dinwiddie could pick up that role. Dinwiddie will fill a crucial hole for the Wizards, but it's hard to gauge where the guard should be drafted, as he's coming off a serious injury and is joining a new team. Ultimately, given his situation in Washington, Dinwiddie should see plenty of production as the starting point guard for a revamped Wizards team.
CHR (C)
G
69
Min
24.6
FPTS
1,118.0
REB
509.0
AST
247.0
STL
53.0
BLK
61.0
TO
132.0
FGM
275.0
FGA
462.0
FTM
133.0
FTA
249.0
Plumlee is coming off the best season of his career as the Pistons' starting center. In 26.8 minutes per game, he averaged 10.4 points, 9.3 rebounds, 3.6 assists and 1.7 combined blocks-plus-steals. He also shot 61.4 percent from the field and a career-high 66.9 percent from the free-throw line. All together, that resulted in him ranking 96th in fantasy on a per-game basis. During the 2021 offseason, he was dealt to Charlotte in what was essentially a salary dump by Detroit. With the Hornets, Plumlee again projects to be a starter, but P.J. Washington and Bismack Biyombo figure to see time at center, as well. With that in mind, it seems safe to assume Plumlee should have a similar role and could put up comparable numbers to last season. He's a low-upside pick, but there's a decent chance he'll again return top-100 value.
Plumlee is coming off the best season of his career as the Pistons' starting center. In 26.8 minutes per game, he averaged 10.4 points, 9.3 rebounds, 3.6 assists and 1.7 combined blocks-plus-steals. He also shot 61.4 percent from the field and a career-high 66.9 percent from the free-throw line. All together, that resulted in him ranking 96th in fantasy on a per-game basis. During the 2021 offseason, he was dealt to Charlotte in what was essentially a salary dump by Detroit. With the Hornets, Plumlee again projects to be a starter, but P.J. Washington and Bismack Biyombo figure to see time at center, as well. With that in mind, it seems safe to assume Plumlee should have a similar role and could put up comparable numbers to last season. He's a low-upside pick, but there's a decent chance he'll again return top-100 value.
CLE (C)
G
75
Min
27.0
FPTS
1,118.0
REB
490.0
AST
135.0
STL
45.0
BLK
103.0
TO
109.0
FGM
268.0
FGA
484.0
FTM
176.0
FTA
245.0
Easily the most-talented big man in the draft, Mobley will step in as a starter for the Cavs from Day 1. While Cleveland retained Jarrett Allen in free agency, the two bigs represent the frontcourt of the future, with Mobley's floor-spacing ability likely to land him at the power forward spot for the foreseeable future. Right now, Mobley is more comfortable in the mid-range than from three (30% 3PT as a freshman at USC last season), but he has a smooth jumper that should improve as he develops. Playing alongside Allen could sap some of Mobley's upside as a rebounder, but he's a much better passer than Allen, and his 2.9 blocks per game at USC suggest that it could be his most-valuable stat category when it comes to fantasy basketball. Cleveland's sign-and-trade deal for Lauri Markkanen will complicate Mobley's development. The Cavs gave up Larry Nance for Markkanen and signed him to a four year deal, so clearly Cleveland is committed to both Markkanen and Mobley. How the minutes are divided amongst those two and Kevin Love at the four will be very interesting. Love has stated he has no interest in a buy out. Like all rookies, expect Mobley to go through some ups and downs, but he'll likely come off the board in the later-middle-rounds of most fantasy drafts.
Easily the most-talented big man in the draft, Mobley will step in as a starter for the Cavs from Day 1. While Cleveland retained Jarrett Allen in free agency, the two bigs represent the frontcourt of the future, with Mobley's floor-spacing ability likely to land him at the power forward spot for the foreseeable future. Right now, Mobley is more comfortable in the mid-range than from three (30% 3PT as a freshman at USC last season), but he has a smooth jumper that should improve as he develops. Playing alongside Allen could sap some of Mobley's upside as a rebounder, but he's a much better passer than Allen, and his 2.9 blocks per game at USC suggest that it could be his most-valuable stat category when it comes to fantasy basketball. Cleveland's sign-and-trade deal for Lauri Markkanen will complicate Mobley's development. The Cavs gave up Larry Nance for Markkanen and signed him to a four year deal, so clearly Cleveland is committed to both Markkanen and Mobley. How the minutes are divided amongst those two and Kevin Love at the four will be very interesting. Love has stated he has no interest in a buy out. Like all rookies, expect Mobley to go through some ups and downs, but he'll likely come off the board in the later-middle-rounds of most fantasy drafts.
HOU (G)
G
75
Min
33.6
FPTS
1,117.0
REB
292.0
AST
203.0
STL
61.0
BLK
32.0
TO
167.0
FGM
519.0
FGA
1,213.0
FTM
214.0
FTA
265.0
A few years from now, it wouldn't be shocking if Green emerges as the best player from the 2021 draft. But in terms of immediate fantasy impact, he's in a tier just below Cade Cunningham. A natural, polished scorer, Green will be the favorite to lead all rookies in points per game. He shined in three Summer League games, and his G League Ignite numbers imply that he'll carry a high three-point attempt rate. While that will likely lead to a relatively pedestrian field goal percentage, that's par for the course when it comes to rookie guards. In terms of non-scoring stats, Green averaged 4.1 rebounds, 2.8 assists and 1.5 steals in 15 G League games (32.0 MPG), so while points will be his calling card, he can still offer some non-scoring production. The biggest question for Green is where he'll fall in the hierarchy for a rebuilding Rockets team that features a borderline-All-Star in Christian Wood and a high-volume gunner in Kevin Porter Jr. However, Green's development should take precedence over Wood and Porter.
A few years from now, it wouldn't be shocking if Green emerges as the best player from the 2021 draft. But in terms of immediate fantasy impact, he's in a tier just below Cade Cunningham. A natural, polished scorer, Green will be the favorite to lead all rookies in points per game. He shined in three Summer League games, and his G League Ignite numbers imply that he'll carry a high three-point attempt rate. While that will likely lead to a relatively pedestrian field goal percentage, that's par for the course when it comes to rookie guards. In terms of non-scoring stats, Green averaged 4.1 rebounds, 2.8 assists and 1.5 steals in 15 G League games (32.0 MPG), so while points will be his calling card, he can still offer some non-scoring production. The biggest question for Green is where he'll fall in the hierarchy for a rebuilding Rockets team that features a borderline-All-Star in Christian Wood and a high-volume gunner in Kevin Porter Jr. However, Green's development should take precedence over Wood and Porter.
TOR (C)
G
68
Min
24.5
FPTS
1,116.0
REB
447.0
AST
154.0
STL
39.0
BLK
97.0
TO
56.0
FGM
314.0
FGA
567.0
FTM
113.0
FTA
166.0
ATL (G)
G
68
Min
32.2
FPTS
1,113.0
REB
256.0
AST
237.0
STL
79.0
BLK
19.0
TO
126.0
FGM
437.0
FGA
950.0
FTM
80.0
FTA
93.0
Leg injuries limited Bogdanovic to 44 games last season, but he played very well in his debut campaign with the Hawks. He played a super-sixth-man role, seeing 29.7 minutes per game and averaging career highs in points (16.4), rebounds (3.6), steals (1.1), field-goal percentage (47.3), three-point percentage (43.8), made threes (3.3) and free-throw percentage (90.9). Unsurprisingly, that resulted in Bogdanovic finishing with the best per-game fantasy rank (63) of his career -- the first time he's finished inside the top 100. The 20-year-old was especially efficient as a long-mid-range shooter (38-of-71, 54%) and a corner three-point shooter (42-of-78, 54%). Fantasy managers shouldn't expect a major change of pace for Bogdanovic in 2021-22. It's possible better health from his teammates -- namely De'Andre Hunter and Cam Reddish -- could result in Bogdanovic seeing a slightly reduced workload, but he should still finish inside the top 100 again. That said, his ceiling isn't especially high, so fantasy managers shouldn't feel a need to snipe him early in drafts. He'll likely be a common selection in the seventh round or later.
Leg injuries limited Bogdanovic to 44 games last season, but he played very well in his debut campaign with the Hawks. He played a super-sixth-man role, seeing 29.7 minutes per game and averaging career highs in points (16.4), rebounds (3.6), steals (1.1), field-goal percentage (47.3), three-point percentage (43.8), made threes (3.3) and free-throw percentage (90.9). Unsurprisingly, that resulted in Bogdanovic finishing with the best per-game fantasy rank (63) of his career -- the first time he's finished inside the top 100. The 20-year-old was especially efficient as a long-mid-range shooter (38-of-71, 54%) and a corner three-point shooter (42-of-78, 54%). Fantasy managers shouldn't expect a major change of pace for Bogdanovic in 2021-22. It's possible better health from his teammates -- namely De'Andre Hunter and Cam Reddish -- could result in Bogdanovic seeing a slightly reduced workload, but he should still finish inside the top 100 again. That said, his ceiling isn't especially high, so fantasy managers shouldn't feel a need to snipe him early in drafts. He'll likely be a common selection in the seventh round or later.
NOR (G)
G
73
Min
27.5
FPTS
1,109.0
REB
554.0
AST
176.0
STL
71.0
BLK
26.0
TO
85.0
FGM
249.0
FGA
581.0
FTM
100.0
FTA
130.0
Hart appeared in just 47 games due to a variety of injuries last season, but he put together another solid season as the Pelicans' unique sixth man. In 28.7 minutes per game, he averaged 9.2 points, 8.0 rebounds and 2.3 assists, which led to a per-game fantasy rank of 143. Hart's impressive rebounding for a 6-foot-5 guard is carrying his fantasy value, as the rest of his game leaves something to be desired. He's a low-volume, relatively inefficient scorer (splits of 44/33/78) who doesn't provide significant defensive stats. Hart has stronger real-life value as a utility player who can play upwards of four positions in certain situations. For all his flaws, the Pelicans committed a three-year, $38 million contract to him during the offseason, suggesting the organization believes in the 26-year-old's potential and that he should continue seeing minutes in the high-20s. Fantasy managers in standard leagues can probably ignore Hart, but there's reason to explore rostering him in deep leagues and keeper/dynasty formats. However, keep in mind that he has a relatively low ceiling given his current situation. He'll never be taking the ball out of the hands of Zion Williamson, Brandon Ingram, Devonte' Graham or even Jonas Valanciunas. A best-case scenario for Hart (not counting injuries to players ahead of him) is developing into a better three-point shooter.
Hart appeared in just 47 games due to a variety of injuries last season, but he put together another solid season as the Pelicans' unique sixth man. In 28.7 minutes per game, he averaged 9.2 points, 8.0 rebounds and 2.3 assists, which led to a per-game fantasy rank of 143. Hart's impressive rebounding for a 6-foot-5 guard is carrying his fantasy value, as the rest of his game leaves something to be desired. He's a low-volume, relatively inefficient scorer (splits of 44/33/78) who doesn't provide significant defensive stats. Hart has stronger real-life value as a utility player who can play upwards of four positions in certain situations. For all his flaws, the Pelicans committed a three-year, $38 million contract to him during the offseason, suggesting the organization believes in the 26-year-old's potential and that he should continue seeing minutes in the high-20s. Fantasy managers in standard leagues can probably ignore Hart, but there's reason to explore rostering him in deep leagues and keeper/dynasty formats. However, keep in mind that he has a relatively low ceiling given his current situation. He'll never be taking the ball out of the hands of Zion Williamson, Brandon Ingram, Devonte' Graham or even Jonas Valanciunas. A best-case scenario for Hart (not counting injuries to players ahead of him) is developing into a better three-point shooter.
LAL (C)
G
72
Min
26.0
FPTS
1,101.0
REB
577.0
AST
78.0
STL
47.0
BLK
104.0
TO
148.0
FGM
282.0
FGA
431.0
FTM
171.0
FTA
317.0
After one year with the Sixers, Howard returns to the Lakers, hoping to earn another championship ring. Over the past two seasons, the veteran has reshaped his career as a useful, defense-oriented back-up center. However, Howard may actually have a chance to return to starting this season. Marc Gasol is heading back to Spain, and Anthony Davis hasn't shown an interest in being anything but a power forward during the regular season. While we shouldn't expect Howard to see true starter's minutes, it's possible he crosses the 20-minute threshold for the first time since 2018-19 when he appeared in nine games for the Wizards. That might allow him to have fantasy relevance in deep leagues. For his career, when seeing minutes in the 20s, Howard has averaged 12.6 points, 10.1 rebounds, 1.5 blocks and 1.1 assists. DeAndre Jordan is also in the mix at center, but it's unlikely he'll truly be threatening Howard for minutes considering how little the Nets utilized him when it mattered last season.
After one year with the Sixers, Howard returns to the Lakers, hoping to earn another championship ring. Over the past two seasons, the veteran has reshaped his career as a useful, defense-oriented back-up center. However, Howard may actually have a chance to return to starting this season. Marc Gasol is heading back to Spain, and Anthony Davis hasn't shown an interest in being anything but a power forward during the regular season. While we shouldn't expect Howard to see true starter's minutes, it's possible he crosses the 20-minute threshold for the first time since 2018-19 when he appeared in nine games for the Wizards. That might allow him to have fantasy relevance in deep leagues. For his career, when seeing minutes in the 20s, Howard has averaged 12.6 points, 10.1 rebounds, 1.5 blocks and 1.1 assists. DeAndre Jordan is also in the mix at center, but it's unlikely he'll truly be threatening Howard for minutes considering how little the Nets utilized him when it mattered last season.
BOS (G)
G
74
Min
28.6
FPTS
1,092.0
REB
254.0
AST
369.0
STL
70.0
BLK
15.0
TO
179.0
FGM
402.0
FGA
916.0
FTM
216.0
FTA
254.0
After functioning as the sixth man for the Thunder in the previous two seasons, Schroder started all 61 of his appearances in a Lakers uniform in 2020-21. While he had a productive year and posted his highest assists (5.8 APG) and steals (1.1 SPG) averages since 2017-18, Schroder's field goal (43.7% FG) and three-point (33.5% 3Pt) percentages both plummeted. After rejecting a mid-season contract extension from the Lakers, Schroder hit free agency and settled for a one-year, $5.9 million deal with the Celtics. While the money may not have been what he was looking for, Schroder projects to slide into the starting point guard role vacated by Kemba Walker. Boston doesn't have a ton of proven depth behind Schroder, so he'll likely be set for a similar workload to last season (32.1 MPG). Of course, Jayson Tatum and Jaylen Brown will be the focal points of the Celtics' attack, but Schroder will have a good chance to emerge as the No. 3 option ahead of Marcus Smart.
After functioning as the sixth man for the Thunder in the previous two seasons, Schroder started all 61 of his appearances in a Lakers uniform in 2020-21. While he had a productive year and posted his highest assists (5.8 APG) and steals (1.1 SPG) averages since 2017-18, Schroder's field goal (43.7% FG) and three-point (33.5% 3Pt) percentages both plummeted. After rejecting a mid-season contract extension from the Lakers, Schroder hit free agency and settled for a one-year, $5.9 million deal with the Celtics. While the money may not have been what he was looking for, Schroder projects to slide into the starting point guard role vacated by Kemba Walker. Boston doesn't have a ton of proven depth behind Schroder, so he'll likely be set for a similar workload to last season (32.1 MPG). Of course, Jayson Tatum and Jaylen Brown will be the focal points of the Celtics' attack, but Schroder will have a good chance to emerge as the No. 3 option ahead of Marcus Smart.
MEM (F)
G
76
Min
32.3
FPTS
1,085.0
REB
271.0
AST
174.0
STL
81.0
BLK
31.0
TO
144.0
FGM
527.0
FGA
1,222.0
FTM
193.0
FTA
236.0
Brooks is coming off his best season as a pro, highlighted by an impressive playoff run. During the regular season, he ranked 126th in fantasy on a per-game basis through averages of 17.2 points, 2.9 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.2 steals. During the Grizzlies' postseason run -- for this exercise, including the final regular-season game against the Warriors and the two subsequent play-in games -- Brooks took on the toughest backcourt assignments while averaging 23.1 points, 4.0 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.4 steals. While he shot poorly from three (29.0 percent), he doubled his free-throw rate and shot 47.4 percent from the field. Brooks' role should remain similar in 2021-22. He'll start at shooting guard and seeing roughly 30 minutes per game. Fantasy managers have reason to be optimistic about his development following the Grizzlies' playoff run, so drafting him inside the top 100 is defensible. Memphis isn't an especially potent offensive team, so they'll continue to look to Brooks to score 15-25 points regularly. The main steps for him moving forward are being a more consistent three-point shooter and drawing more fouls, as he did in the playoffs. His secondary playmaking has also improved, but the Grizzlies don't need that from him with Ja Morant, Eric Bledsoe and Kyle Anderson around.
Brooks is coming off his best season as a pro, highlighted by an impressive playoff run. During the regular season, he ranked 126th in fantasy on a per-game basis through averages of 17.2 points, 2.9 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.2 steals. During the Grizzlies' postseason run -- for this exercise, including the final regular-season game against the Warriors and the two subsequent play-in games -- Brooks took on the toughest backcourt assignments while averaging 23.1 points, 4.0 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.4 steals. While he shot poorly from three (29.0 percent), he doubled his free-throw rate and shot 47.4 percent from the field. Brooks' role should remain similar in 2021-22. He'll start at shooting guard and seeing roughly 30 minutes per game. Fantasy managers have reason to be optimistic about his development following the Grizzlies' playoff run, so drafting him inside the top 100 is defensible. Memphis isn't an especially potent offensive team, so they'll continue to look to Brooks to score 15-25 points regularly. The main steps for him moving forward are being a more consistent three-point shooter and drawing more fouls, as he did in the playoffs. His secondary playmaking has also improved, but the Grizzlies don't need that from him with Ja Morant, Eric Bledsoe and Kyle Anderson around.
ORL (G)
G
77
Min
32.7
FPTS
1,082.0
REB
277.0
AST
349.0
STL
83.0
BLK
20.0
TO
214.0
FGM
412.0
FGA
952.0
FTM
199.0
FTA
255.0
The dynamic guard helped lead Gonzaga to the National Championship Game behind averages of 14.4 points, 5.3 rebounds, 4.5 assists and 1.9 steals to go with a 50-34-75 shooting line. The three-point and free-throw percentages are somewhat concerning, but Suggs has a smooth-looking jumpshot that should improve with time. Other than Cade Cunningham, Suggs projects as the most well-rounded fantasy player in the class - especially if his high steal rate translates to the next level. Suggs joins a Magic roster in dire need of a player with true star potential. Cole Anthony had an encouraging rookie year and Markelle Fultz was looking better before tearing his ACL, but Suggs is immediately the top asset for a team loaded with cast-offs and theoretical three-and-D wings. It will be interesting to see how Orlando handles the Suggs-Anthony pairing, but Suggs' ability to play both guard spots is a significant mark in his favor. With the Magic mired into a multi-year rebuild and destined for the lottery again in 2022, Suggs is in as good of a stat-producing position as any rookie in the class. In three Summer League appearances, Suggs fared well, putting up 15.3 points, 6.3 rebounds, 2.3 assists, 1.7 steals and 1.0 block in just 21.8 minutes per game.
The dynamic guard helped lead Gonzaga to the National Championship Game behind averages of 14.4 points, 5.3 rebounds, 4.5 assists and 1.9 steals to go with a 50-34-75 shooting line. The three-point and free-throw percentages are somewhat concerning, but Suggs has a smooth-looking jumpshot that should improve with time. Other than Cade Cunningham, Suggs projects as the most well-rounded fantasy player in the class - especially if his high steal rate translates to the next level. Suggs joins a Magic roster in dire need of a player with true star potential. Cole Anthony had an encouraging rookie year and Markelle Fultz was looking better before tearing his ACL, but Suggs is immediately the top asset for a team loaded with cast-offs and theoretical three-and-D wings. It will be interesting to see how Orlando handles the Suggs-Anthony pairing, but Suggs' ability to play both guard spots is a significant mark in his favor. With the Magic mired into a multi-year rebuild and destined for the lottery again in 2022, Suggs is in as good of a stat-producing position as any rookie in the class. In three Summer League appearances, Suggs fared well, putting up 15.3 points, 6.3 rebounds, 2.3 assists, 1.7 steals and 1.0 block in just 21.8 minutes per game.
IND (F)
G
68
Min
31.9
FPTS
1,081.0
REB
308.0
AST
294.0
STL
86.0
BLK
16.0
TO
192.0
FGM
432.0
FGA
1,009.0
FTM
217.0
FTA
278.0
LeVert spent 12 games with the Nets before being dealt to the Pacers in January as part of the four-team James Harden deal. However, upon going to Indiana, his physical revealed a left kidney carcinoma. He underwent surgery to address the mass and was able to return in March. He proceeded to appear in 35 games for his new team and averaged 20.7 points, 4.9 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 1.5 steals in 32.9 minutes. Putting aside the missed games, LeVert's 2020-21 campaign was the best of his career, as he ranked 55th in fantasy in per-game production -- his third straight season improving his fantasy value. Heading into 2021-22, LeVert should remain the Pacers' starting shooting guard and will be one of the highest-usage players on the team alongside Domantas Sabonis and Malcolm Brogdon. However, before selecting LeVert as high as the fourth or fifth round, fantasy managers should consider his extensive injury history (not including the kidney carcinoma). Injuries were much of the reason LeVert slipped to 20th overall in the 2016 NBA Draft, and he's appeared in more than 57 games just once in his career.
LeVert spent 12 games with the Nets before being dealt to the Pacers in January as part of the four-team James Harden deal. However, upon going to Indiana, his physical revealed a left kidney carcinoma. He underwent surgery to address the mass and was able to return in March. He proceeded to appear in 35 games for his new team and averaged 20.7 points, 4.9 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 1.5 steals in 32.9 minutes. Putting aside the missed games, LeVert's 2020-21 campaign was the best of his career, as he ranked 55th in fantasy in per-game production -- his third straight season improving his fantasy value. Heading into 2021-22, LeVert should remain the Pacers' starting shooting guard and will be one of the highest-usage players on the team alongside Domantas Sabonis and Malcolm Brogdon. However, before selecting LeVert as high as the fourth or fifth round, fantasy managers should consider his extensive injury history (not including the kidney carcinoma). Injuries were much of the reason LeVert slipped to 20th overall in the 2016 NBA Draft, and he's appeared in more than 57 games just once in his career.
HOU (F)
G
70
Min
24.5
FPTS
1,079.0
REB
466.0
AST
122.0
STL
41.0
BLK
92.0
TO
59.0
FGM
259.0
FGA
467.0
FTM
107.0
FTA
142.0
After two subpar years in Boston as a reserve player, Theis made a name for himself as a reliable starter during his past two seasons. The Rockets snatched the veteran up on a four-year, $36 million deal this offseason. The 29-year-old averaged 9.6 points, 5.5 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 0.9 blocks across 24.6 minutes per game as he split time between Boston and Chicago last year. The seven-footer saw a noticeable regression in his rebounding, as his per-game averages fell from 6.6 rebounds in 2019 to 5.5 last year. This drop caused him to slip from 92nd overall in fantasy scoring during the 2019-20 season to 118th overall last season. It is still uncertain whether Theis will be the opening day starter for the Rockets, as they have rising star Christian Wood and the No. 16 overall pick Alperen Sengun also on the roster. However, given Theis' ability to play both frontcourt spots, it is safe to assume Theis will play a significant role for Houston in 2021-22 and may be in line for a career year.
After two subpar years in Boston as a reserve player, Theis made a name for himself as a reliable starter during his past two seasons. The Rockets snatched the veteran up on a four-year, $36 million deal this offseason. The 29-year-old averaged 9.6 points, 5.5 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 0.9 blocks across 24.6 minutes per game as he split time between Boston and Chicago last year. The seven-footer saw a noticeable regression in his rebounding, as his per-game averages fell from 6.6 rebounds in 2019 to 5.5 last year. This drop caused him to slip from 92nd overall in fantasy scoring during the 2019-20 season to 118th overall last season. It is still uncertain whether Theis will be the opening day starter for the Rockets, as they have rising star Christian Wood and the No. 16 overall pick Alperen Sengun also on the roster. However, given Theis' ability to play both frontcourt spots, it is safe to assume Theis will play a significant role for Houston in 2021-22 and may be in line for a career year.
DEN (G)
G
76
Min
29.8
FPTS
1,078.0
REB
189.0
AST
353.0
STL
76.0
BLK
24.0
TO
73.0
FGM
377.0
FGA
806.0
FTM
103.0
FTA
123.0
For the first time in his young career, Morris dealt with the injury bug during his 2020-21 campaign. The 6-foot-2 guard played in just 47 games last season, first missing a chunk of the season with a strained quad and then missing another 11 games near the end of the season due to a hamstring injury. Morris averaged just 10.2 points and 3.2 assists in 25.4 minutes per game while shooting a very respectable 38.1 percent from three. The Iowa State product's numbers did improve in the games he played after Jamal Murray tore his ACL, however, averaging 12.7 points and 4.9 assists per game. That said, the Nuggets were still easing Morris back into the lineup during that time and he only started one game during that span, which ended up being the team's final game of the season. Entering the new year, Denver figures to still be without their star point guard in Murray for the start of the season, making the starting point guard spot wide open in Denver. The crafty Facundo Campazzo was getting the starts without Murray at the end of the year last season, but again, this could easily be attributed to the team playing it cautious with Morris and his injury status. The Nuggets still are deep at the position with the likes of older players in Campazzo and Austin Rivers, while still having youth at the position in Markus Howard and Nah'Shon "Bones" Hyland as well. Even with their sturdy depth, there is reason to believe Morris will be starting for Denver in place of Murray to begin the year, which may lead to Morris' most productive season yet as a pro.
For the first time in his young career, Morris dealt with the injury bug during his 2020-21 campaign. The 6-foot-2 guard played in just 47 games last season, first missing a chunk of the season with a strained quad and then missing another 11 games near the end of the season due to a hamstring injury. Morris averaged just 10.2 points and 3.2 assists in 25.4 minutes per game while shooting a very respectable 38.1 percent from three. The Iowa State product's numbers did improve in the games he played after Jamal Murray tore his ACL, however, averaging 12.7 points and 4.9 assists per game. That said, the Nuggets were still easing Morris back into the lineup during that time and he only started one game during that span, which ended up being the team's final game of the season. Entering the new year, Denver figures to still be without their star point guard in Murray for the start of the season, making the starting point guard spot wide open in Denver. The crafty Facundo Campazzo was getting the starts without Murray at the end of the year last season, but again, this could easily be attributed to the team playing it cautious with Morris and his injury status. The Nuggets still are deep at the position with the likes of older players in Campazzo and Austin Rivers, while still having youth at the position in Markus Howard and Nah'Shon "Bones" Hyland as well. Even with their sturdy depth, there is reason to believe Morris will be starting for Denver in place of Murray to begin the year, which may lead to Morris' most productive season yet as a pro.
MEM (F)
G
72
Min
26.1
FPTS
1,065.0
REB
384.0
AST
248.0
STL
76.0
BLK
52.0
TO
93.0
FGM
286.0
FGA
618.0
FTM
113.0
FTA
150.0
The seven-year veteran disappointed fantasy managers in 2019-20 but bounced back with a much-better 2020-21 campaign, in which he averaged career highs in points (12.4 PPG), assists (3.6 APG) and three-pointers (1.4 3PM) per game. As usual, Anderson posted a strong field goal percentage (46.8% FG) while tacking on 5.7 rebounds and 0.8 blocks in 27.3 minutes. Anderson's workload jumped by nearly eight minutes per game relative to 2019-20, and he made a concerted effort to expand his range, taking 261 three-pointers -- 176 more than his previous career-high total. With Dillon Brooks taking a major leap and rookie Desmond Bane emerging as a key contributor last season, it's possible Anderson could take a minor step back in 2021-22. Even so, the UCLA product can be penciled in as one of the Grizzlies' starting forwards, so he projects as a steady, mid-to-late-round option in standard leagues.
The seven-year veteran disappointed fantasy managers in 2019-20 but bounced back with a much-better 2020-21 campaign, in which he averaged career highs in points (12.4 PPG), assists (3.6 APG) and three-pointers (1.4 3PM) per game. As usual, Anderson posted a strong field goal percentage (46.8% FG) while tacking on 5.7 rebounds and 0.8 blocks in 27.3 minutes. Anderson's workload jumped by nearly eight minutes per game relative to 2019-20, and he made a concerted effort to expand his range, taking 261 three-pointers -- 176 more than his previous career-high total. With Dillon Brooks taking a major leap and rookie Desmond Bane emerging as a key contributor last season, it's possible Anderson could take a minor step back in 2021-22. Even so, the UCLA product can be penciled in as one of the Grizzlies' starting forwards, so he projects as a steady, mid-to-late-round option in standard leagues.
CHR (F)
G
74
Min
27.3
FPTS
1,054.0
REB
387.0
AST
140.0
STL
53.0
BLK
53.0
TO
96.0
FGM
350.0
FGA
746.0
FTM
113.0
FTA
133.0
Bridges made steady improvement for a third straight season last year, and he was part of one of the most explosive and entertaining alley-oop connections in the league with LaMelo Ball. The biggest improvement in Bridges' game was improved efficiency. While his points per game dropped marginally from 13.0 to 12.7, the forward nearly shot 50/40/90, going 50/40/87. Aside from his 12.7 points, he averaged career-highs in 6.0 rebounds and 2.2 assists while contributing a nice 1.5 combined blocks-plus-steals. That allowed him to rank 95th on a per-game basis. Bridges also benefited from Gordon Hayward missing time, with Bridges drawing 19 starts in 66 appearances. However, Bridges might have trouble reaching the 29.3 minutes per game he saw in 2020-21. In addition to Hayward starting the season healthy, the Hornets added Kelly Oubre in the offseason, who has positional overlap with Bridges at small forward. The hope for Bridges is that P.J. Washington plays a lot of small-ball center, opening up the wing for Bridges to still find near-starter's minutes. Fantasy managers have justification to take Bridges inside the top 100, but there probably isn't much upside unless another forward suffers a significant injury.
Bridges made steady improvement for a third straight season last year, and he was part of one of the most explosive and entertaining alley-oop connections in the league with LaMelo Ball. The biggest improvement in Bridges' game was improved efficiency. While his points per game dropped marginally from 13.0 to 12.7, the forward nearly shot 50/40/90, going 50/40/87. Aside from his 12.7 points, he averaged career-highs in 6.0 rebounds and 2.2 assists while contributing a nice 1.5 combined blocks-plus-steals. That allowed him to rank 95th on a per-game basis. Bridges also benefited from Gordon Hayward missing time, with Bridges drawing 19 starts in 66 appearances. However, Bridges might have trouble reaching the 29.3 minutes per game he saw in 2020-21. In addition to Hayward starting the season healthy, the Hornets added Kelly Oubre in the offseason, who has positional overlap with Bridges at small forward. The hope for Bridges is that P.J. Washington plays a lot of small-ball center, opening up the wing for Bridges to still find near-starter's minutes. Fantasy managers have justification to take Bridges inside the top 100, but there probably isn't much upside unless another forward suffers a significant injury.
UTA (F)
G
80
Min
32.0
FPTS
1,054.0
REB
512.0
AST
225.0
STL
74.0
BLK
40.0
TO
102.0
FGM
207.0
FGA
482.0
FTM
55.0
FTA
69.0
O'Neale continued to improve upon his fantasy value in 2020-21, reaching a career-high per-game rank of 139. He started in all 71 of his appearances and averaged 7.0 points on 44/39/85 shooting, 6.8 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.3 combined steals-plus-blocks in 31.6 minutes. He's one of the lowest-usage (9.9 percent) players in the NBA, but he's carved out a relatively traditional 3-and-D role that's allowed him to positively contribute to a great team. O'Neale's role shouldn't change in 2021-22. He'll presumably continue starting at power forward and see roughly 30 minutes per game. There's room for him to marginally increase his production if he becomes a better three-point shooter, but, ultimately, there are so many weapons around him in Utah that he has a capped ceiling. O'Neale makes sense as a late-round fantasy option in deep leagues.
O'Neale continued to improve upon his fantasy value in 2020-21, reaching a career-high per-game rank of 139. He started in all 71 of his appearances and averaged 7.0 points on 44/39/85 shooting, 6.8 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.3 combined steals-plus-blocks in 31.6 minutes. He's one of the lowest-usage (9.9 percent) players in the NBA, but he's carved out a relatively traditional 3-and-D role that's allowed him to positively contribute to a great team. O'Neale's role shouldn't change in 2021-22. He'll presumably continue starting at power forward and see roughly 30 minutes per game. There's room for him to marginally increase his production if he becomes a better three-point shooter, but, ultimately, there are so many weapons around him in Utah that he has a capped ceiling. O'Neale makes sense as a late-round fantasy option in deep leagues.
IND (F)
G
68
Min
30.3
FPTS
1,052.0
REB
283.0
AST
93.0
STL
38.0
BLK
32.0
TO
79.0
FGM
470.0
FGA
960.0
FTM
170.0
FTA
211.0
Warren played just four games last season after suffering a stress fracture in his foot that required surgery. It was a highly anticipated campaign for the forward after he played shockingly well in the 2020 Orlando Bubble, where he averaged 34.8 points, 6.6 rebounds, 2.4 assists, 1.6 steals and 1.4 blocks in the first five games. Warren is expected to come into the 2021-22 season healthy, though injuries have been the overarching story of his career. He's been in the league since 2014 and hasn't played more than 67 games in a season. That hasn't stopped him from being a strong per-game producer, however. From 2016-17 through 2019-20, Warren averaged 17.9 points on 51/36/79 shooting, 4.7 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.1 steals in 32.2 minutes -- good for an average per-game fantasy rank of 76.5. In 2021-22, Warren figures to start at small forward for the Pacers. He should be in position to again be a top-100 player, but fantasy managers need to keep in mind his prevalent injury history.
Warren played just four games last season after suffering a stress fracture in his foot that required surgery. It was a highly anticipated campaign for the forward after he played shockingly well in the 2020 Orlando Bubble, where he averaged 34.8 points, 6.6 rebounds, 2.4 assists, 1.6 steals and 1.4 blocks in the first five games. Warren is expected to come into the 2021-22 season healthy, though injuries have been the overarching story of his career. He's been in the league since 2014 and hasn't played more than 67 games in a season. That hasn't stopped him from being a strong per-game producer, however. From 2016-17 through 2019-20, Warren averaged 17.9 points on 51/36/79 shooting, 4.7 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.1 steals in 32.2 minutes -- good for an average per-game fantasy rank of 76.5. In 2021-22, Warren figures to start at small forward for the Pacers. He should be in position to again be a top-100 player, but fantasy managers need to keep in mind his prevalent injury history.
DAL (G)
G
78
Min
29.6
FPTS
1,050.0
REB
257.0
AST
147.0
STL
45.0
BLK
6.0
TO
76.0
FGM
423.0
FGA
967.0
FTM
166.0
FTA
201.0
Hardaway played in 70 games during his second full season in Dallas, averaging 16.6 points in 28.4 minutes per game. The 6-foot-5 wing shot 44.7 percent from the field, 39.1 percent from three and 81.6 percent from the free-throw line. It marked the second straight season that Hardaway shot over 39.0 percent from three after never shooting above 36.0 percent during his previous five years in the NBA. The playmaking abilities of Luka Doncic clearly opened up space for the Michigan product to get plenty of good looks from distance. While Hardaway is an efficient -- and occasionally prolific -- scorer, he doesn't impact the game in other areas. He has never tallied more than 4.0 rebounds or 3.0 assists and has only surpassed 1.0 steals per game once in his career. This lack of production has caused Hardaway to never finish inside the top 100 in total fantasy production. His scoring ability alone makes him an intriguing streaming option, but unless you catch him on a hot streak, his production may be meager. The Mavericks brought in Reggie Bullock and Sterling Brown in free agency, but neither should steal playing time away from the ex-Wolverine. It is safe to expect more of the same from Hardaway during the 2021-22 season.
Hardaway played in 70 games during his second full season in Dallas, averaging 16.6 points in 28.4 minutes per game. The 6-foot-5 wing shot 44.7 percent from the field, 39.1 percent from three and 81.6 percent from the free-throw line. It marked the second straight season that Hardaway shot over 39.0 percent from three after never shooting above 36.0 percent during his previous five years in the NBA. The playmaking abilities of Luka Doncic clearly opened up space for the Michigan product to get plenty of good looks from distance. While Hardaway is an efficient -- and occasionally prolific -- scorer, he doesn't impact the game in other areas. He has never tallied more than 4.0 rebounds or 3.0 assists and has only surpassed 1.0 steals per game once in his career. This lack of production has caused Hardaway to never finish inside the top 100 in total fantasy production. His scoring ability alone makes him an intriguing streaming option, but unless you catch him on a hot streak, his production may be meager. The Mavericks brought in Reggie Bullock and Sterling Brown in free agency, but neither should steal playing time away from the ex-Wolverine. It is safe to expect more of the same from Hardaway during the 2021-22 season.
UTA (F)
G
74
Min
32.2
FPTS
1,050.0
REB
297.0
AST
150.0
STL
39.0
BLK
8.0
TO
182.0
FGM
424.0
FGA
958.0
FTM
252.0
FTA
286.0
Last season was up-and-down for Bogdanovic. He had rough stretches, including an 18-game span during which he averaged just 12.8 points on 39.4 percent shooting. But he also had great stretches, like the final 19 games of the season, when he averaged 23.4 points on 48.8 percent shooting. The good couldn't quite outweigh the bad though, as Bogdanovic finished 130th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- quite the dip from his 2019-20 rank of 78 and his 2018-19 rank of 94. The forward saw nearly all of his numbers, including percentages, dip compared to 2019-20, leading to the somewhat drastic fall in rank. Fantasy managers burned by Bogdanovic might not be interested in drafting him in 2021-22, but he still has potential to be a steal if you can get him within the final picks of a standard draft. While the Jazz are relatively deep with capable scorers -- Mike Conley, Donovan Mitchell, Jordan Clarkson, Joe Ingles and new addition Rudy Gay -- Bogdanovic will be a 30-minute staple due to his sharpshooting (40.9 percent from three over the past three seasons) and underrated ability to get to the free-throw line for a shooter (3.9 attempts per game over the past three seasons).
Last season was up-and-down for Bogdanovic. He had rough stretches, including an 18-game span during which he averaged just 12.8 points on 39.4 percent shooting. But he also had great stretches, like the final 19 games of the season, when he averaged 23.4 points on 48.8 percent shooting. The good couldn't quite outweigh the bad though, as Bogdanovic finished 130th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- quite the dip from his 2019-20 rank of 78 and his 2018-19 rank of 94. The forward saw nearly all of his numbers, including percentages, dip compared to 2019-20, leading to the somewhat drastic fall in rank. Fantasy managers burned by Bogdanovic might not be interested in drafting him in 2021-22, but he still has potential to be a steal if you can get him within the final picks of a standard draft. While the Jazz are relatively deep with capable scorers -- Mike Conley, Donovan Mitchell, Jordan Clarkson, Joe Ingles and new addition Rudy Gay -- Bogdanovic will be a 30-minute staple due to his sharpshooting (40.9 percent from three over the past three seasons) and underrated ability to get to the free-throw line for a shooter (3.9 attempts per game over the past three seasons).
HOU (F)
G
79
Min
28.8
FPTS
1,049.0
REB
432.0
AST
220.0
STL
98.0
BLK
50.0
TO
121.0
FGM
314.0
FGA
710.0
FTM
84.0
FTA
116.0
Tate was picked up by the Rockets last season after going undrafted, and his level of production was unexpected. He started 58 of his 70 appearances for Houston, and his performances really started to pick up in early February. From Feb. 4 onward, the forward averaged 12.6 points on 50/31/70 shooting, 5.6 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.4 steals in 30.6 minutes. He ranked 118th in per-game fantasy production, but his availability allowed him to rank a surprising 75th in total production. His role figures to be reduced heading into 2021-22. The Rockets drafted promising rookie Jalen Green with the No. 2 overall pick in the 2021 draft, and he figures to start at either shooting guard or small forward next to Kevin Porter. The additions of Daniel Theis and Alperen Sengun also complicate Tate's ability to play in the frontcourt. Danuel House and Eric Gordon will also be vying for minutes on the wing. All things considered, it seems likely that Tate's production will take a step back. He should go undrafted in standard leagues but could function as a decent pickup if the Rockets start to deal with injuries.
Tate was picked up by the Rockets last season after going undrafted, and his level of production was unexpected. He started 58 of his 70 appearances for Houston, and his performances really started to pick up in early February. From Feb. 4 onward, the forward averaged 12.6 points on 50/31/70 shooting, 5.6 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.4 steals in 30.6 minutes. He ranked 118th in per-game fantasy production, but his availability allowed him to rank a surprising 75th in total production. His role figures to be reduced heading into 2021-22. The Rockets drafted promising rookie Jalen Green with the No. 2 overall pick in the 2021 draft, and he figures to start at either shooting guard or small forward next to Kevin Porter. The additions of Daniel Theis and Alperen Sengun also complicate Tate's ability to play in the frontcourt. Danuel House and Eric Gordon will also be vying for minutes on the wing. All things considered, it seems likely that Tate's production will take a step back. He should go undrafted in standard leagues but could function as a decent pickup if the Rockets start to deal with injuries.
WAS (F)
G
75
Min
26.3
FPTS
1,048.0
REB
478.0
AST
107.0
STL
38.0
BLK
35.0
TO
123.0
FGM
386.0
FGA
867.0
FTM
152.0
FTA
208.0
Coming off a down year during the 2019-20 season, Kuzma bounced back as he filled in for LeBron James and Anthony Davis, who both missed time with injuries. As for Kuzma's 2020-21 campaign, the 26-year-old averaged 12.9 points, 6.1 rebounds, 1.9 assists and 0.6 blocks. Kuzma hit 44.3 percent of his shots from the field and 36.1 percent from beyond the three-point arc. This upcoming season, Kuzma should see a much larger role on a Wizards team that lacks consistent scoring options behind Bradley Beal and the newly-acquired Spencer Dinwiddie. Kuzma finished last season with 25 games scoring at least 15 points, which is the scoring consistency the Wizards will expect from the ex-Laker. The forward will likely compete for minutes with Davis Bertans, Rui Hachimura and Deni Avdija, which is much more favorable than his situation with the Lakers. Kuzma should see more production this season, as he'll likely be on the court more and will be able to take more shots. If Kuzma ends up in the Wizards starting lineup, it's possible his assist numbers see an increase since he'll be passing the ball to one of the league's best all-around scorers in Beal.
Coming off a down year during the 2019-20 season, Kuzma bounced back as he filled in for LeBron James and Anthony Davis, who both missed time with injuries. As for Kuzma's 2020-21 campaign, the 26-year-old averaged 12.9 points, 6.1 rebounds, 1.9 assists and 0.6 blocks. Kuzma hit 44.3 percent of his shots from the field and 36.1 percent from beyond the three-point arc. This upcoming season, Kuzma should see a much larger role on a Wizards team that lacks consistent scoring options behind Bradley Beal and the newly-acquired Spencer Dinwiddie. Kuzma finished last season with 25 games scoring at least 15 points, which is the scoring consistency the Wizards will expect from the ex-Laker. The forward will likely compete for minutes with Davis Bertans, Rui Hachimura and Deni Avdija, which is much more favorable than his situation with the Lakers. Kuzma should see more production this season, as he'll likely be on the court more and will be able to take more shots. If Kuzma ends up in the Wizards starting lineup, it's possible his assist numbers see an increase since he'll be passing the ball to one of the league's best all-around scorers in Beal.
PHI (G)
G
72
Min
29.9
FPTS
1,043.0
REB
198.0
AST
212.0
STL
52.0
BLK
12.0
TO
85.0
FGM
382.0
FGA
795.0
FTM
116.0
FTA
133.0
Curry has changed teams every season of his career, but he may have finally found a home in Philadelphia. The sharpshooter is coming off his best season, ranking 150th in fantasy (per game) with averages of 12.5 points, 2.7 assists, 2.4 rebounds and most notably, 2.2 threes in 28.7 minutes. Last season marked Curry's fourth season inside the top 6 for three-point percentage (45.0), and he holds the best three-point percentage of all active players (44.4). While he doesn't get the volume of his brother, Steph, Curry continues to chart his own path as one of the most dangerous players in NBA history to leave open from deep. His presence is crucial for spacing the floor for Joel Embiid, and even though Curry takes fewer than 10 shots per game, he's helping the team with his gravity. His role should remain similar in 2021-22. He doesn't need to be drafted in standard leagues, but fantasy managers in deep formats should consider Curry with a late pick.
Curry has changed teams every season of his career, but he may have finally found a home in Philadelphia. The sharpshooter is coming off his best season, ranking 150th in fantasy (per game) with averages of 12.5 points, 2.7 assists, 2.4 rebounds and most notably, 2.2 threes in 28.7 minutes. Last season marked Curry's fourth season inside the top 6 for three-point percentage (45.0), and he holds the best three-point percentage of all active players (44.4). While he doesn't get the volume of his brother, Steph, Curry continues to chart his own path as one of the most dangerous players in NBA history to leave open from deep. His presence is crucial for spacing the floor for Joel Embiid, and even though Curry takes fewer than 10 shots per game, he's helping the team with his gravity. His role should remain similar in 2021-22. He doesn't need to be drafted in standard leagues, but fantasy managers in deep formats should consider Curry with a late pick.
CLE (F)
G
68
Min
27.8
FPTS
1,040.0
REB
418.0
AST
79.0
STL
56.0
BLK
32.0
TO
108.0
FGM
371.0
FGA
806.0
FTM
119.0
FTA
143.0
Markkanen saw his workload reduced for the second season in a row in 2020-21, and his health also remained an issue. Markkanen has appeared in just 153 games over the past three seasons. He hit career lows with 13.6 points and 5.3 rebounds, though he did reach career highs in field-goal percentage (48.0) and three-point percentage (40.2). He'll be joining a new team in 2020-21, as he was part of a sign-and-trade that landed him in Cleveland on a four-year, $64 million contract. Given the size of his contract, it seems possible Markkanen will start at power forward, even if that means bringing the No. 3 overall pick Evan Mobley or Kevin Love off the bench. The other option to get Markkanen in the starting lineup would be trying to play him at small forward, but that's something he's done very little of in the past. That would also result in kicking Isaac Okoro -- the fifth pick from last year -- to the bench, though it'd result in less backlash from the fanbase. Regardless, Markkanen should be in line to see minutes anywhere from the high-20s to the mid-30s on the Cavaliers depending on how he produces. He should be the team's No. 3 option at worst at any given time, and that could improve to No. 2 or even No. 1 if he sees minutes with the bench unit. Ultimately, this is a fresh start for Markkanen, and while it may not be the smoothest transition into a new role, it certainly has potential on the rebuilding Cavs.
Markkanen saw his workload reduced for the second season in a row in 2020-21, and his health also remained an issue. Markkanen has appeared in just 153 games over the past three seasons. He hit career lows with 13.6 points and 5.3 rebounds, though he did reach career highs in field-goal percentage (48.0) and three-point percentage (40.2). He'll be joining a new team in 2020-21, as he was part of a sign-and-trade that landed him in Cleveland on a four-year, $64 million contract. Given the size of his contract, it seems possible Markkanen will start at power forward, even if that means bringing the No. 3 overall pick Evan Mobley or Kevin Love off the bench. The other option to get Markkanen in the starting lineup would be trying to play him at small forward, but that's something he's done very little of in the past. That would also result in kicking Isaac Okoro -- the fifth pick from last year -- to the bench, though it'd result in less backlash from the fanbase. Regardless, Markkanen should be in line to see minutes anywhere from the high-20s to the mid-30s on the Cavaliers depending on how he produces. He should be the team's No. 3 option at worst at any given time, and that could improve to No. 2 or even No. 1 if he sees minutes with the bench unit. Ultimately, this is a fresh start for Markkanen, and while it may not be the smoothest transition into a new role, it certainly has potential on the rebuilding Cavs.
WAS (F)
G
67
Min
30.8
FPTS
1,034.0
REB
400.0
AST
111.0
STL
53.0
BLK
18.0
TO
76.0
FGM
377.0
FGA
787.0
FTM
161.0
FTA
200.0
In Hachimura's second season with the Wizards, the forward saw a similar role to his rookie season. He notched similar averages of 13.8 points, 5.5 rebounds and 1.4 assists. Last season, the 23-year-old recorded 26 games where he managed 15 or more points and he even improved his three-point shooting percentage by almost five percent (32.8). Hachimura didn't face much competition for minutes during the 2019-20 season, but he is expected to this upcoming season as the Wizards have a lot more depth in the frontcourt. The former Gonzaga star will battle with Davis Bertans, Kyle Kuzma and Deni Avdija for playing time. With Russell Westbrook now a Laker, the Wizards will need role players like Hachimura to step up and score more on any given night. It's likely Hachimura will start every game again like last season, but he could end up seeing fewer minutes, and his numbers may drop. There is plenty of upside in taking a young forward who can break out in any game, but the risks of him losing his starting role and seeing less production could result in Hachimura getting drafted in the final few rounds of fantasy drafts.
In Hachimura's second season with the Wizards, the forward saw a similar role to his rookie season. He notched similar averages of 13.8 points, 5.5 rebounds and 1.4 assists. Last season, the 23-year-old recorded 26 games where he managed 15 or more points and he even improved his three-point shooting percentage by almost five percent (32.8). Hachimura didn't face much competition for minutes during the 2019-20 season, but he is expected to this upcoming season as the Wizards have a lot more depth in the frontcourt. The former Gonzaga star will battle with Davis Bertans, Kyle Kuzma and Deni Avdija for playing time. With Russell Westbrook now a Laker, the Wizards will need role players like Hachimura to step up and score more on any given night. It's likely Hachimura will start every game again like last season, but he could end up seeing fewer minutes, and his numbers may drop. There is plenty of upside in taking a young forward who can break out in any game, but the risks of him losing his starting role and seeing less production could result in Hachimura getting drafted in the final few rounds of fantasy drafts.
WAS (C)
G
69
Min
20.7
FPTS
1,031.0
REB
406.0
AST
49.0
STL
30.0
BLK
131.0
TO
68.0
FGM
278.0
FGA
414.0
FTM
116.0
FTA
169.0
It was not a pretty start to the 2020-21 campaign for Gafford, as he barely saw the floor in the first half of the season with Chicago. The 6-foot-10 big played just 12.4 minutes per game while scoring only 4.7 points in 31 games. However, Gafford still managed 1.1 blocks per game despite the limited action. The Arkansas' product's season immediately changed after he was dealt to Washington at the trade deadline. Gafford quickly carved out a role with the Wizards, as he averaged 10.1 points, 5.6 rebounds and 1.8 blocks in 17.7 minutes per game. However, his best moments came in the play-in-games and Playoffs, where he posted 12.3 points and 6.7 rebounds in 22.9 minutes per game. In the postseason, he recorded a block in each game, while rejecting five shots in two separate games. While Gafford enters the new year on a high note, it will be far from a cake walk to the starting center job in 2021-22. The Wizards acquired big-man Montrezl Harrell in the offseason wand still have another talented young big in Thomas Bryant, who's still working back from a torn ACL. While Gafford will face stiff competition for minutes, with Bryant on the shelf to begin the season and the rest of the rotation yet to be established, Gafford should have an opportunity to compete for the starting center job. For fantasy managers, the hope is Gafford sees enough minutes to creep closer to 2.0 blocks per game.
It was not a pretty start to the 2020-21 campaign for Gafford, as he barely saw the floor in the first half of the season with Chicago. The 6-foot-10 big played just 12.4 minutes per game while scoring only 4.7 points in 31 games. However, Gafford still managed 1.1 blocks per game despite the limited action. The Arkansas' product's season immediately changed after he was dealt to Washington at the trade deadline. Gafford quickly carved out a role with the Wizards, as he averaged 10.1 points, 5.6 rebounds and 1.8 blocks in 17.7 minutes per game. However, his best moments came in the play-in-games and Playoffs, where he posted 12.3 points and 6.7 rebounds in 22.9 minutes per game. In the postseason, he recorded a block in each game, while rejecting five shots in two separate games. While Gafford enters the new year on a high note, it will be far from a cake walk to the starting center job in 2021-22. The Wizards acquired big-man Montrezl Harrell in the offseason wand still have another talented young big in Thomas Bryant, who's still working back from a torn ACL. While Gafford will face stiff competition for minutes, with Bryant on the shelf to begin the season and the rest of the rotation yet to be established, Gafford should have an opportunity to compete for the starting center job. For fantasy managers, the hope is Gafford sees enough minutes to creep closer to 2.0 blocks per game.
HOU (G)
G
65
Min
31.9
FPTS
1,027.0
REB
260.0
AST
339.0
STL
64.0
BLK
26.0
TO
205.0
FGM
406.0
FGA
954.0
FTM
193.0
FTA
259.0
Porter was shipped to Houston last January for a second-round pick. The Rockets had Porter play 15 G League games, where he dominated, before joining the parent club. Porter appeared in 26 games (23 starts) with the Rockets, averaging 16.6 points, 6.3 assists and 3.8 rebounds. His shooting splits (43/31/73) left something to be desired, but he hasn't even reached 82 NBA games played yet. Most notably, Porter produced a 50-point, 11-assist game against the Bucks in late April. Based on that alone, there's plenty of reason to believe in Porter's upside. The 21-year-old is one of the focal points of Houston's rebuild along with rookies Jalen Green and Alperen Sengun, plus Christian Wood. With the news that John Wall won't play for the Rockets this season, Porter is firmly established as the team's starting point guard. Notably, he averaged 19.9 points and 8.0 assists per 36 minutes last season with Wall and James Harden off the court. On one hand, expecting that out of Porter seems extremely optimistic. On the other hand, another year of development and organizational commitment means Porter is certainly in position for a breakout season.
Porter was shipped to Houston last January for a second-round pick. The Rockets had Porter play 15 G League games, where he dominated, before joining the parent club. Porter appeared in 26 games (23 starts) with the Rockets, averaging 16.6 points, 6.3 assists and 3.8 rebounds. His shooting splits (43/31/73) left something to be desired, but he hasn't even reached 82 NBA games played yet. Most notably, Porter produced a 50-point, 11-assist game against the Bucks in late April. Based on that alone, there's plenty of reason to believe in Porter's upside. The 21-year-old is one of the focal points of Houston's rebuild along with rookies Jalen Green and Alperen Sengun, plus Christian Wood. With the news that John Wall won't play for the Rockets this season, Porter is firmly established as the team's starting point guard. Notably, he averaged 19.9 points and 8.0 assists per 36 minutes last season with Wall and James Harden off the court. On one hand, expecting that out of Porter seems extremely optimistic. On the other hand, another year of development and organizational commitment means Porter is certainly in position for a breakout season.
BRO (G)
G
75
Min
30.4
FPTS
1,026.0
REB
297.0
AST
155.0
STL
44.0
BLK
18.0
TO
112.0
FGM
381.0
FGA
775.0
FTM
57.0
FTA
73.0
Harris is coming off the best fantasy season of his career by a small margin, with the sharpshooting wing ranking 115th overall on a per-game basis. Surrounded by the talent of James Harden, Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving, Harris was able to shoot a league-high 47.5 percent from three-point range, hitting 3.1 per game to help fuel his 14.1 points. He also averaged 3.6 rebounds and 1.9 assists and shot a career-high 50.5 percent from the field. Harris was the eighth-most efficient player in the NBA on a true-shooting percentage (66.3) basis. Harris' role shouldn't change heading into 2021-22. It's almost a guarantee that he'll start at small forward and see roughly 30 minutes per game. His only real competition for minutes are Patty Mills and Bruce Brown, but Brown can play practically any position and Mills can play both guard slots. Ultimately, Harris is a quality fantasy selection at around pick 100. He's a prototypical high-floor, low-ceiling player. At this point, you know exactly what you're getting from him on a night-to-night basis, and that's some of the best three-point shooting in the league.
Harris is coming off the best fantasy season of his career by a small margin, with the sharpshooting wing ranking 115th overall on a per-game basis. Surrounded by the talent of James Harden, Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving, Harris was able to shoot a league-high 47.5 percent from three-point range, hitting 3.1 per game to help fuel his 14.1 points. He also averaged 3.6 rebounds and 1.9 assists and shot a career-high 50.5 percent from the field. Harris was the eighth-most efficient player in the NBA on a true-shooting percentage (66.3) basis. Harris' role shouldn't change heading into 2021-22. It's almost a guarantee that he'll start at small forward and see roughly 30 minutes per game. His only real competition for minutes are Patty Mills and Bruce Brown, but Brown can play practically any position and Mills can play both guard slots. Ultimately, Harris is a quality fantasy selection at around pick 100. He's a prototypical high-floor, low-ceiling player. At this point, you know exactly what you're getting from him on a night-to-night basis, and that's some of the best three-point shooting in the league.
NY (G)
G
75
Min
31.8
FPTS
1,025.0
REB
197.0
AST
236.0
STL
82.0
BLK
22.0
TO
144.0
FGM
401.0
FGA
889.0
FTM
185.0
FTA
229.0
In August of 2021, Fournier agreed to a hefty four-year, $78 million contract with the Knicks. This occurred after an eventful 2020-21 season which started in Orlando, paused in Boston after a trade-deadline move and ended with a strong Olympic run with Team France. Fournier was cruising through another typically productive season with the Magic and was on pace to set a new career-high in points per game (19.7) before he was dealt to Boston. With the Celtics, the shooting guard appeared in only 16 of 28 regular season games due to COVID-19 protocols. The Knicks entered the off-season with tons of cap space and a need to add backcourt scoring. With the additions of Fournier and Kemba Walker, New York seemingly has cured that issue. Expect Fournier to play north of 30 minutes per game, as coach Tom Thibodeau loves to give his starters extended run. The 29-year-old should receive plenty of catch-and-shoot opportunities with Walker and Julius Randle controlling most of the ball-handling. When Walker sits (he missed 45 out of 144 games over the last two seasons), Fournier will battle veteran Derrick Rose and third-year guard RJ Barrett as the second scoring option after Randle. The Frenchman will also look to build off of last year's three-point shooting, when he hit a career-high 2.8 threes per game and shot a career-best 41.3 percent from behind the arc. The risk with Fournier will be Thibodeau's patience with the shooting guard's mediocre defense, though he did grab 1.1 steals per game last year. Presumably, Fournier's ability to spread the floor on the offensive end will more than make up for his defensive woes.
In August of 2021, Fournier agreed to a hefty four-year, $78 million contract with the Knicks. This occurred after an eventful 2020-21 season which started in Orlando, paused in Boston after a trade-deadline move and ended with a strong Olympic run with Team France. Fournier was cruising through another typically productive season with the Magic and was on pace to set a new career-high in points per game (19.7) before he was dealt to Boston. With the Celtics, the shooting guard appeared in only 16 of 28 regular season games due to COVID-19 protocols. The Knicks entered the off-season with tons of cap space and a need to add backcourt scoring. With the additions of Fournier and Kemba Walker, New York seemingly has cured that issue. Expect Fournier to play north of 30 minutes per game, as coach Tom Thibodeau loves to give his starters extended run. The 29-year-old should receive plenty of catch-and-shoot opportunities with Walker and Julius Randle controlling most of the ball-handling. When Walker sits (he missed 45 out of 144 games over the last two seasons), Fournier will battle veteran Derrick Rose and third-year guard RJ Barrett as the second scoring option after Randle. The Frenchman will also look to build off of last year's three-point shooting, when he hit a career-high 2.8 threes per game and shot a career-best 41.3 percent from behind the arc. The risk with Fournier will be Thibodeau's patience with the shooting guard's mediocre defense, though he did grab 1.1 steals per game last year. Presumably, Fournier's ability to spread the floor on the offensive end will more than make up for his defensive woes.
MIL (C)
G
73
Min
26.8
FPTS
1,022.0
REB
335.0
AST
107.0
STL
50.0
BLK
121.0
TO
75.0
FGM
315.0
FGA
642.0
FTM
110.0
FTA
130.0
Lopez took a slight step back in 2020-21, largely due to his declining block rate (2.4 blocks to 1.5 blocks) as a result of the Bucks valuing switching on defense more than strictly leaning on Lopez to protect the rim on every possession. That led to Lopez ranking 107th in fantasy on a per-game basis compared to his rank of 77 in 2019-20. The center's other numbers included 12.3 points, 5.0 rebounds and 1.4 threes on 50.3 percent shooting -- his highest mark since 2015-16. His increased field-goal percentage was in part due to the Bucks' featuring him more in the post rather than being nearly a pure three-point shooter. While his play can often be boom-or-bust (as daily fantasy players are well aware of), he has one of the highest floors in season-long fantasy. It's possible signs of aging start to set in for the 33-year-old sooner than later, but he's still the Bucks' clear No. 1 option at center and should continue to see minutes in the mid-to-high 20s. He's a low upside player, so there's no reason to draft him significantly inside the top 100, but he can still go there as a nice second option at center for managers.
Lopez took a slight step back in 2020-21, largely due to his declining block rate (2.4 blocks to 1.5 blocks) as a result of the Bucks valuing switching on defense more than strictly leaning on Lopez to protect the rim on every possession. That led to Lopez ranking 107th in fantasy on a per-game basis compared to his rank of 77 in 2019-20. The center's other numbers included 12.3 points, 5.0 rebounds and 1.4 threes on 50.3 percent shooting -- his highest mark since 2015-16. His increased field-goal percentage was in part due to the Bucks' featuring him more in the post rather than being nearly a pure three-point shooter. While his play can often be boom-or-bust (as daily fantasy players are well aware of), he has one of the highest floors in season-long fantasy. It's possible signs of aging start to set in for the 33-year-old sooner than later, but he's still the Bucks' clear No. 1 option at center and should continue to see minutes in the mid-to-high 20s. He's a low upside player, so there's no reason to draft him significantly inside the top 100, but he can still go there as a nice second option at center for managers.
ORL (F)
G
68
Min
28.8
FPTS
1,021.0
REB
404.0
AST
173.0
STL
85.0
BLK
56.0
TO
53.0
FGM
278.0
FGA
623.0
FTM
75.0
FTA
99.0
After missing all of his would-be rookie season due to a torn ACL, the 16th overall pick in 2019 made his NBA debut last season. Things didn't start off on a great note, as he missed all of January due to a knee injury, but he was eventually given a much bigger role once the Magic dealt Nikola Vucevic at the trade deadline and committed to a rebuild. During his final 18 appearances, Okeke averaged 12.8 points on 45/35/81 shooting, 4.8 rebounds, 1.5 steals and 2.2 combined steals-plus-blocks. While the end of his season was also cut short due to an ankle injury, he still managed to rank 86th in per-game fantasy value from March 24 through the final game of the season. Heading into 2021-22, there's a good chance Okeke will start at power forward, though he'll be competing with rookie Franz Wagner, who was selected with the eighth overall pick over the summer. Still, even if Okeke doesn't start, he should be in line for minutes in the mid-to-upper 20s for the rebuilding squad. Given what he was able to accomplish when given real minutes last season, fantasy managers have justification to take a late-round flier on him, though he might end up really only being viable in deeper leagues, especially if Jonathan Isaac (knee) can stay healthy and Wagner plays well. Dynasty/keeper league managers should be encouraged by the 23-year-old's rookie campaign, however.
After missing all of his would-be rookie season due to a torn ACL, the 16th overall pick in 2019 made his NBA debut last season. Things didn't start off on a great note, as he missed all of January due to a knee injury, but he was eventually given a much bigger role once the Magic dealt Nikola Vucevic at the trade deadline and committed to a rebuild. During his final 18 appearances, Okeke averaged 12.8 points on 45/35/81 shooting, 4.8 rebounds, 1.5 steals and 2.2 combined steals-plus-blocks. While the end of his season was also cut short due to an ankle injury, he still managed to rank 86th in per-game fantasy value from March 24 through the final game of the season. Heading into 2021-22, there's a good chance Okeke will start at power forward, though he'll be competing with rookie Franz Wagner, who was selected with the eighth overall pick over the summer. Still, even if Okeke doesn't start, he should be in line for minutes in the mid-to-upper 20s for the rebuilding squad. Given what he was able to accomplish when given real minutes last season, fantasy managers have justification to take a late-round flier on him, though he might end up really only being viable in deeper leagues, especially if Jonathan Isaac (knee) can stay healthy and Wagner plays well. Dynasty/keeper league managers should be encouraged by the 23-year-old's rookie campaign, however.
WAS (C)
G
58
Min
25.7
FPTS
1,018.0
REB
355.0
AST
93.0
STL
32.0
BLK
61.0
TO
69.0
FGM
325.0
FGA
528.0
FTM
86.0
FTA
121.0
Bryant came into the 2020-21 NBA season with high expectations after impressive play in the NBA's bubble. But then 10 games into the season the big center tore his ACL and was forced to miss the remainder of the year. In his 10 games, Bryant managed to average 14.3 points, 6.1 rebounds and 1.5 assists, while he hit 64.8 percent from the field and 42.9 percent from beyond the three-point arc. The former Indiana star's greatest performance last season was a 21-point, 14-rebound effort in a win over the Nets. For the upcoming season, Bryant is expected to miss the beginning of the season as he continues the rehab process for his knee. When healthy, the center will likely face more competition for playing time as the Wizards acquired Montrezl Harrell over the offseason. Also, center Daniel Gafford showed great potential when he started for the Wizards in the playoffs last season. The Wizards could possibly go through another full season with a three-man rotation at the center position, but that ultimately depends on how well Bryant's play is once he returns to the court. The 24-year-old Bryant is a very risky fantasy selection as he's battled with injuries in each of the last two seasons and could see limited minutes if Gafford or Harrell start the season strong.
Bryant came into the 2020-21 NBA season with high expectations after impressive play in the NBA's bubble. But then 10 games into the season the big center tore his ACL and was forced to miss the remainder of the year. In his 10 games, Bryant managed to average 14.3 points, 6.1 rebounds and 1.5 assists, while he hit 64.8 percent from the field and 42.9 percent from beyond the three-point arc. The former Indiana star's greatest performance last season was a 21-point, 14-rebound effort in a win over the Nets. For the upcoming season, Bryant is expected to miss the beginning of the season as he continues the rehab process for his knee. When healthy, the center will likely face more competition for playing time as the Wizards acquired Montrezl Harrell over the offseason. Also, center Daniel Gafford showed great potential when he started for the Wizards in the playoffs last season. The Wizards could possibly go through another full season with a three-man rotation at the center position, but that ultimately depends on how well Bryant's play is once he returns to the court. The 24-year-old Bryant is a very risky fantasy selection as he's battled with injuries in each of the last two seasons and could see limited minutes if Gafford or Harrell start the season strong.
DEN (F)
G
67
Min
28.0
FPTS
1,015.0
REB
357.0
AST
264.0
STL
60.0
BLK
28.0
TO
86.0
FGM
313.0
FGA
723.0
FTM
101.0
FTA
130.0
Barton has been one of the most up-and-down fantasy players on a year-to-year basis since joining the Nuggets. That's partially due to his injury history, as he's played just 157 games in the past three seasons. Putting injuries aside, he ranked 193rd in 2018-19 on a per-game basis, 71st in 2019-20 and 147th last year. Despite the injury issues and inconsistent play, Barton and the Nuggets agreed to a two-year, $32 million deal in the 2021 offseason. With all of the warning signs in mind, the soon-to-be 31-year-old has potential to have the best season of his career. The Nuggets will be without Jamal Murray (knee) for much of the 2021-21 season, which should put the ball in Barton's hands more often. With Murray off the court last season, Barton averaged 16.6 points, 4.6 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.2 steals per 36 minutes. While the Nuggets do have other playmaking options -- Monte Morris, Facundo Campazzo, Austin Rivers and even Aaron Gordon -- Barton is an excellent multi-position glue piece that can do a bit of everything offensively. Fantasy managers should understand the risk before drafting Barton, but he qualifies as a late-round sleeper this season. He's ranked as high as 53rd in fantasy, which was during the 2017-18 season when he averaged 15.7 points, 5.0 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 1.0 steals in 33.1 minutes.
Barton has been one of the most up-and-down fantasy players on a year-to-year basis since joining the Nuggets. That's partially due to his injury history, as he's played just 157 games in the past three seasons. Putting injuries aside, he ranked 193rd in 2018-19 on a per-game basis, 71st in 2019-20 and 147th last year. Despite the injury issues and inconsistent play, Barton and the Nuggets agreed to a two-year, $32 million deal in the 2021 offseason. With all of the warning signs in mind, the soon-to-be 31-year-old has potential to have the best season of his career. The Nuggets will be without Jamal Murray (knee) for much of the 2021-21 season, which should put the ball in Barton's hands more often. With Murray off the court last season, Barton averaged 16.6 points, 4.6 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.2 steals per 36 minutes. While the Nuggets do have other playmaking options -- Monte Morris, Facundo Campazzo, Austin Rivers and even Aaron Gordon -- Barton is an excellent multi-position glue piece that can do a bit of everything offensively. Fantasy managers should understand the risk before drafting Barton, but he qualifies as a late-round sleeper this season. He's ranked as high as 53rd in fantasy, which was during the 2017-18 season when he averaged 15.7 points, 5.0 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 1.0 steals in 33.1 minutes.
DAL (F)
G
76
Min
32.3
FPTS
1,013.0
REB
469.0
AST
132.0
STL
52.0
BLK
45.0
TO
80.0
FGM
274.0
FGA
597.0
FTM
39.0
FTA
51.0
Finney-Smith's development has been slow and steady, with the forward increasing his fantasy value for a fourth straight season last year. He ranked 132nd on a per-game basis behind 9.8 points, 5.4 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 1.3 combined steals-plus-blocks in 32.0 minutes. His shooting splits of 47/39/76 resulted in a career-best 60.9 true-shooting percentage. He's almost exclusively a spot-up three-point shooter on offense (80 percent of his overall baskets are assisted), but he has an impressive offensive rebounding rate (1.8 ORB per 36 minutes) for his position and role. Heading into 2021-22, Finney-Smith has some competition for minutes. Dallas added Reggie Bullock -- another 3-and-D wing -- during the offseason. Bullock has a longer track record as a three-point marksman and notably hit 2.5 triples per game at 41.0 percent last season. That said, whether Finney-Smith starts or comes off the bench, he should still see minutes in the upper-20s. Plus, he has hidden upside due to Kristaps Porzingis' injury history. Fantasy managers in standard leagues can safely avoid Finney-Smith, but managers in deep leagues can grab him with a very late pick to secure someone with a relatively high floor.
Finney-Smith's development has been slow and steady, with the forward increasing his fantasy value for a fourth straight season last year. He ranked 132nd on a per-game basis behind 9.8 points, 5.4 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 1.3 combined steals-plus-blocks in 32.0 minutes. His shooting splits of 47/39/76 resulted in a career-best 60.9 true-shooting percentage. He's almost exclusively a spot-up three-point shooter on offense (80 percent of his overall baskets are assisted), but he has an impressive offensive rebounding rate (1.8 ORB per 36 minutes) for his position and role. Heading into 2021-22, Finney-Smith has some competition for minutes. Dallas added Reggie Bullock -- another 3-and-D wing -- during the offseason. Bullock has a longer track record as a three-point marksman and notably hit 2.5 triples per game at 41.0 percent last season. That said, whether Finney-Smith starts or comes off the bench, he should still see minutes in the upper-20s. Plus, he has hidden upside due to Kristaps Porzingis' injury history. Fantasy managers in standard leagues can safely avoid Finney-Smith, but managers in deep leagues can grab him with a very late pick to secure someone with a relatively high floor.
POR (F)
G
63
Min
26.7
FPTS
1,013.0
REB
462.0
AST
139.0
STL
88.0
BLK
33.0
TO
68.0
FGM
251.0
FGA
487.0
FTM
56.0
FTA
84.0
For better or for worse, Nance's fantasy value has been tied to Kevin Love's health in recent years. That's resulted in Nance often being a nice, late-round draft selection or mid-season pick-up due to Love's consistent injury issues. He's ranked inside the top-105 in each of the past three seasons. Last year, he was 85th in per-game production via 9.3 points, 6.7 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 2.2 combined steals-plus-blocks in 31.2 minutes. He's also improved his three-point shooting, hitting 1.1 threes per game at 35.5 percent over the past two seasons. This season brings about a new opportunity for Nance, as he was dealt to the Trail Blazers in the offseason in the trade that sent Lauri Markkanen to the Cavaliers. Nance has potential to play a multi-position sixth-man role for the Blazers, who are extremely short on quality depth. Though Nance has mostly played power forward and center, he saw some run at small forward last season and has a chance to continue that in Portland. Fantasy managers who have been high on Nance's upside in recent seasons should feel good about this move. Aggressively, he could be targeted around picks 80-90, but he can probably be had later than that.
For better or for worse, Nance's fantasy value has been tied to Kevin Love's health in recent years. That's resulted in Nance often being a nice, late-round draft selection or mid-season pick-up due to Love's consistent injury issues. He's ranked inside the top-105 in each of the past three seasons. Last year, he was 85th in per-game production via 9.3 points, 6.7 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 2.2 combined steals-plus-blocks in 31.2 minutes. He's also improved his three-point shooting, hitting 1.1 threes per game at 35.5 percent over the past two seasons. This season brings about a new opportunity for Nance, as he was dealt to the Trail Blazers in the offseason in the trade that sent Lauri Markkanen to the Cavaliers. Nance has potential to play a multi-position sixth-man role for the Blazers, who are extremely short on quality depth. Though Nance has mostly played power forward and center, he saw some run at small forward last season and has a chance to continue that in Portland. Fantasy managers who have been high on Nance's upside in recent seasons should feel good about this move. Aggressively, he could be targeted around picks 80-90, but he can probably be had later than that.
LAC (G)
G
73
Min
29.6
FPTS
1,012.0
REB
267.0
AST
280.0
STL
38.0
BLK
15.0
TO
148.0
FGM
399.0
FGA
919.0
FTM
136.0
FTA
157.0
Jackson's 2020-21 regular season was a tale of two halves. Prior to the All-Star break, the veteran point guard averaged a quiet 8.7 points, 2.9 assists, 2.6 rebounds and 1.3 three-pointers across 20.1 minutes per contest. Jackson turned things around considerably thereafter, posting per-game averages of 12.8 points, 3.2 dimes, 3.2 boards and 2.4 treys over 26.1 minutes after the break. The jump in three-pointers was especially helpful from a fantasy perspective, and Jackson's solid percentages (44.5 percent from the field, 45.5 percent from deep and 87.8 percent from the free-throw line) along with his low 1.2 turnovers per contest further boosted his second-half appeal. The former Boston College star added a third -- and most promising -- phase to his campaign in the playoffs, when he averaged 17.8 points, 3.4 assists, 3.2 rebounds and 3.1 three-pointers in 19 games. Those numbers jumped to 21.4 points, 4.4 assists, 3.9 rebounds and 3.0 threes after Kawhi Leonard went down with a season-ending injury against Utah in the second round, which could provide some guidance on how to approach Jackson in fantasy drafts next season. With Leonard out until at least February -- and potentially for the entire season -- the 31-year-old figures to take on a prominent offensive role next to Paul George. Patrick Beverley and Rajon Rondo were dealt in the offseason, leaving plenty of minutes at point guard for Jackson. If he's able to come close to replicating last season's playoff performance, he could be a savvy draft pick in the mid-to-late rounds.
Jackson's 2020-21 regular season was a tale of two halves. Prior to the All-Star break, the veteran point guard averaged a quiet 8.7 points, 2.9 assists, 2.6 rebounds and 1.3 three-pointers across 20.1 minutes per contest. Jackson turned things around considerably thereafter, posting per-game averages of 12.8 points, 3.2 dimes, 3.2 boards and 2.4 treys over 26.1 minutes after the break. The jump in three-pointers was especially helpful from a fantasy perspective, and Jackson's solid percentages (44.5 percent from the field, 45.5 percent from deep and 87.8 percent from the free-throw line) along with his low 1.2 turnovers per contest further boosted his second-half appeal. The former Boston College star added a third -- and most promising -- phase to his campaign in the playoffs, when he averaged 17.8 points, 3.4 assists, 3.2 rebounds and 3.1 three-pointers in 19 games. Those numbers jumped to 21.4 points, 4.4 assists, 3.9 rebounds and 3.0 threes after Kawhi Leonard went down with a season-ending injury against Utah in the second round, which could provide some guidance on how to approach Jackson in fantasy drafts next season. With Leonard out until at least February -- and potentially for the entire season -- the 31-year-old figures to take on a prominent offensive role next to Paul George. Patrick Beverley and Rajon Rondo were dealt in the offseason, leaving plenty of minutes at point guard for Jackson. If he's able to come close to replicating last season's playoff performance, he could be a savvy draft pick in the mid-to-late rounds.
CHR (F)
G
69
Min
29.5
FPTS
1,011.0
REB
400.0
AST
90.0
STL
75.0
BLK
52.0
TO
87.0
FGM
363.0
FGA
829.0
FTM
165.0
FTA
218.0
Oubre will be joining his fourth team in as many years. He spent the 2020-21 campaign with the Warriors, where he started off the season abysmally slow. He eventually picked up his production, and from Feb. 4 onward, he averaged 17.6 points on 47/37/68 shooting, 6.4 rebounds, 1.4 assists and 1.7 combined steals-plus-blocks. During those 34 appearances, he ranked 108th in per-game fantasy value. This season, Oubre will be joining the Hornets on a two-year, $26 million-plus deal. He figures to land in a sixth-man role on the wing behind Terry Rozier and Gordon Hayward, though Oubre will also be competing with rookie James Bouknight and Miles Bridges for minutes. That said, Charlotte isn't an especially deep team, so Oubre shouldn't have too much trouble getting run. His numbers don't translate well to fantasy, so he's not usually relevant in standard leagues unless he's seeing 30-plus minutes regularly. That doesn't appear to be a lock with the Hornets, so he's probably a late-round flier in most formats.
Oubre will be joining his fourth team in as many years. He spent the 2020-21 campaign with the Warriors, where he started off the season abysmally slow. He eventually picked up his production, and from Feb. 4 onward, he averaged 17.6 points on 47/37/68 shooting, 6.4 rebounds, 1.4 assists and 1.7 combined steals-plus-blocks. During those 34 appearances, he ranked 108th in per-game fantasy value. This season, Oubre will be joining the Hornets on a two-year, $26 million-plus deal. He figures to land in a sixth-man role on the wing behind Terry Rozier and Gordon Hayward, though Oubre will also be competing with rookie James Bouknight and Miles Bridges for minutes. That said, Charlotte isn't an especially deep team, so Oubre shouldn't have too much trouble getting run. His numbers don't translate well to fantasy, so he's not usually relevant in standard leagues unless he's seeing 30-plus minutes regularly. That doesn't appear to be a lock with the Hornets, so he's probably a late-round flier in most formats.
DAL (G)
G
78
Min
25.1
FPTS
1,011.0
REB
257.0
AST
360.0
STL
42.0
BLK
8.0
TO
126.0
FGM
347.0
FGA
743.0
FTM
117.0
FTA
144.0
Brunson is coming off the most productive season of his career. The guard occupied a sixth-man role for the third straight year with the Mavericks and averaged 12.6 points, 3.5 assists and 3.4 rebounds -- all career highs. He also reached career marks in field-goal percentage (52.3) and three-point percentage (40.5). That resulted in him ranking 184th in fantasy on a per-game basis. Brunson's role shouldn't change in 2021-22. The Mavericks added a little more depth by signing Reggie Bullock, but that shouldn't cut into Brunson's usage significantly. Fantasy managers in standard leagues can ignore Brunson, and those in deeper formats don't need to pay much attention, either, as he's a low-ceiling player in his projected role.
Brunson is coming off the most productive season of his career. The guard occupied a sixth-man role for the third straight year with the Mavericks and averaged 12.6 points, 3.5 assists and 3.4 rebounds -- all career highs. He also reached career marks in field-goal percentage (52.3) and three-point percentage (40.5). That resulted in him ranking 184th in fantasy on a per-game basis. Brunson's role shouldn't change in 2021-22. The Mavericks added a little more depth by signing Reggie Bullock, but that shouldn't cut into Brunson's usage significantly. Fantasy managers in standard leagues can ignore Brunson, and those in deeper formats don't need to pay much attention, either, as he's a low-ceiling player in his projected role.
ATL (F)
G
67
Min
32.2
FPTS
1,006.0
REB
306.0
AST
120.0
STL
59.0
BLK
27.0
TO
110.0
FGM
347.0
FGA
741.0
FTM
239.0
FTA
283.0
Hunter was on his way to being one of the best steals of 2020 fantasy drafts, but he suffered a knee injury Jan. 29 that kept him out nearly for the rest of the season. The sophomore forward ended up playing just 23 games, but he made major strides. Before the injury, he saw 33.4 minutes per game and averaged 17.9 points, 5.6 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.4 combined steals-plus-blocks. His shot was excellent, as he went 52/38/89. Leading up to his injury, he ranked as the 50th-best player in fantasy on a per-game basis. Hunter is expected to be ready for training camp, and he'll be a great selection in drafts this season for informed fantasy managers. He could easily slip in drafts due to lack of name recognition and the significant injury, but considering how well he was playing, there will be some managers targeting him as high as the fifth round. Hunter should open the 2021-22 season as Atlanta's starting small forward and see usage similar to what he was garnering before his injury.
Hunter was on his way to being one of the best steals of 2020 fantasy drafts, but he suffered a knee injury Jan. 29 that kept him out nearly for the rest of the season. The sophomore forward ended up playing just 23 games, but he made major strides. Before the injury, he saw 33.4 minutes per game and averaged 17.9 points, 5.6 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.4 combined steals-plus-blocks. His shot was excellent, as he went 52/38/89. Leading up to his injury, he ranked as the 50th-best player in fantasy on a per-game basis. Hunter is expected to be ready for training camp, and he'll be a great selection in drafts this season for informed fantasy managers. He could easily slip in drafts due to lack of name recognition and the significant injury, but considering how well he was playing, there will be some managers targeting him as high as the fifth round. Hunter should open the 2021-22 season as Atlanta's starting small forward and see usage similar to what he was garnering before his injury.
MIN (G)
G
68
Min
31.2
FPTS
1,006.0
REB
281.0
AST
159.0
STL
49.0
BLK
14.0
TO
100.0
FGM
433.0
FGA
996.0
FTM
106.0
FTA
126.0
In his first full season as a member of the Timberwolves, Beasley averaged 19.6 points per game, shot 39.9 percent from three and started all but one of his appearances. The problem was he only played in 37 games, as a suspension and a hamstring injury kept him sidelined for 35 of the Wolves' final 39 contests. When active, Beasley is one of the league's most underrated, high-volume three-point shooters. He launched 8.7 threes per game last season -- up slightly from the 8.2 per game he attempted in 14 games for Minnesota in 2019-20. The Florida State product is also a knockdown free throw shooter (85 FT% last season) who adds decent rebounds (4.4 RPG) and assists (2.4 APG) contributions. Beasley enters 2021-22 as a projected starter on the wing alongside second-year guard Anthony Edwards. For a middling team, the Timberwolves have several mouths to feed, so it's possible Beasley could cede more shots to Karl-Anthony Towns and D'Angelo Russell, as well as Edwards, who thrived late in the season while Beasley was on the shelf. Even so, Beasley makes for a solid target in the later rounds of a standard fantasy draft.
In his first full season as a member of the Timberwolves, Beasley averaged 19.6 points per game, shot 39.9 percent from three and started all but one of his appearances. The problem was he only played in 37 games, as a suspension and a hamstring injury kept him sidelined for 35 of the Wolves' final 39 contests. When active, Beasley is one of the league's most underrated, high-volume three-point shooters. He launched 8.7 threes per game last season -- up slightly from the 8.2 per game he attempted in 14 games for Minnesota in 2019-20. The Florida State product is also a knockdown free throw shooter (85 FT% last season) who adds decent rebounds (4.4 RPG) and assists (2.4 APG) contributions. Beasley enters 2021-22 as a projected starter on the wing alongside second-year guard Anthony Edwards. For a middling team, the Timberwolves have several mouths to feed, so it's possible Beasley could cede more shots to Karl-Anthony Towns and D'Angelo Russell, as well as Edwards, who thrived late in the season while Beasley was on the shelf. Even so, Beasley makes for a solid target in the later rounds of a standard fantasy draft.
OKC (G)
G
71
Min
31.6
FPTS
1,005.0
REB
311.0
AST
119.0
STL
85.0
BLK
40.0
TO
60.0
FGM
376.0
FGA
903.0
FTM
179.0
FTA
235.0
Dort really broke onto the scene in the 2020 bubble playoffs when he was the player primarily tasked with guarding James Harden. Dort was also left alone from three but kept launching, going 13-for-50 (26.0%) in the six-game series. Despite the struggles, it became clear that the Thunder would feature Dort more in 2020-21. That happened, with the sophomore wing averaging 14.0 points, 3.6 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 1.3 combined steals-plus-blocks in 29.7 minutes. Most notably, he made strides as a three-point shooter, hitting 2.2 per game at a passable 34.3 percent. He also became marginally more confident finding his own shot and dishing to teammates, though that's hardly the focus of his game. Dort is one of the better defenders in the NBA, and it's likely his offense will always lag behind. That said, there will continue to be plenty of opportunities for Dort to expand his game while with the deep-rebuild Thunder. The 22-year-old should continue starting at shooting guard and seeing roughly 30 minutes per game. He ranked just outside of the top 200 last season, but fantasy managers shouldn't be surprised if he can creep closer to the top 150 mark.
Dort really broke onto the scene in the 2020 bubble playoffs when he was the player primarily tasked with guarding James Harden. Dort was also left alone from three but kept launching, going 13-for-50 (26.0%) in the six-game series. Despite the struggles, it became clear that the Thunder would feature Dort more in 2020-21. That happened, with the sophomore wing averaging 14.0 points, 3.6 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 1.3 combined steals-plus-blocks in 29.7 minutes. Most notably, he made strides as a three-point shooter, hitting 2.2 per game at a passable 34.3 percent. He also became marginally more confident finding his own shot and dishing to teammates, though that's hardly the focus of his game. Dort is one of the better defenders in the NBA, and it's likely his offense will always lag behind. That said, there will continue to be plenty of opportunities for Dort to expand his game while with the deep-rebuild Thunder. The 22-year-old should continue starting at shooting guard and seeing roughly 30 minutes per game. He ranked just outside of the top 200 last season, but fantasy managers shouldn't be surprised if he can creep closer to the top 150 mark.
G
71
Min
29.3
FPTS
1,005.0
REB
322.0
AST
245.0
STL
82.0
BLK
46.0
TO
194.0
FGM
401.0
FGA
911.0
FTM
102.0
FTA
154.0
After a shaky rookie campaign, Alexander-Walker made significant strides last season and became a legitimate part of the rotation, though he was sidelined by a leg injury from early April through early May, limiting him to 46 appearances. Even with that being the case, he stepped up in a big way to close the season. In his final 15 appearances (10 starts), the sophomore averaged 16.7 points on 43/39/61 shooting, 4.3 rebounds, 2.8 assists and 2.0 combined steals-plus-blocks. There are still noticeable flaws in the guard's offensive repertoire -- inconsistent three-point shooting, poor finishing ability, subpar passing -- but he's shown enough to be an intriguing deep-league and dynasty fantasy option. The Pelicans' rotation isn't exactly clear before the start of the 2021-22 season. It's possible Alexander-Walker starts, but he could also come off the bench in a sixth-man role. New Orleans' depth isn't especially talented, but there are plenty of other options Alexander-Walker will have to fight off for minutes, including Devonte' Graham, Tomas Satoransky, Kira Lewis, Garrett Temple, Josh Hart and rookie Trey Murphy. For that reason, it's hard to recommend him highly for standard fantasy leagues, though taking a flier with a late-round pick is reasonable.
After a shaky rookie campaign, Alexander-Walker made significant strides last season and became a legitimate part of the rotation, though he was sidelined by a leg injury from early April through early May, limiting him to 46 appearances. Even with that being the case, he stepped up in a big way to close the season. In his final 15 appearances (10 starts), the sophomore averaged 16.7 points on 43/39/61 shooting, 4.3 rebounds, 2.8 assists and 2.0 combined steals-plus-blocks. There are still noticeable flaws in the guard's offensive repertoire -- inconsistent three-point shooting, poor finishing ability, subpar passing -- but he's shown enough to be an intriguing deep-league and dynasty fantasy option. The Pelicans' rotation isn't exactly clear before the start of the 2021-22 season. It's possible Alexander-Walker starts, but he could also come off the bench in a sixth-man role. New Orleans' depth isn't especially talented, but there are plenty of other options Alexander-Walker will have to fight off for minutes, including Devonte' Graham, Tomas Satoransky, Kira Lewis, Garrett Temple, Josh Hart and rookie Trey Murphy. For that reason, it's hard to recommend him highly for standard fantasy leagues, though taking a flier with a late-round pick is reasonable.
OKC (F)
G
72
Min
24.9
FPTS
1,000.0
REB
448.0
AST
154.0
STL
72.0
BLK
50.0
TO
129.0
FGM
300.0
FGA
604.0
FTM
97.0
FTA
129.0
The 45th overall pick in 2019, Roby spent most of his rookie season in the G League, where he put up modest numbers. So, it was a surprise last season when he started 34 of his 61 appearances for the Thunder. The second-year big averaged 8.7 points, 5.6 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.5 combined steals-plus-blocks in 23.4 minutes, leading to a per-game fantasy rank of 181. There's nothing to point to that Roby excels at, though his defensive numbers were solid. Still, it's not clear what Roby's pathway to a legitimate starting role is aside from potentially becoming a better three-point shooter -- he went 32-for-109 (29.4%) last season. That said, he doesn't exactly have real competition in the frontcourt. Derrick Favors is on the roster, but how much will he really play with OKC in a rebuild? Mike Muscala is also not an everyday player for OKC, and Darius Bazley is presumably in the other starting frontcourt spot. Fantasy managers in deep leagues can take a gamble on Roby, but should not expect anything to come from it. Given how the Thunder have operated in the past, it wouldn't be surprising for them to be already searching for Roby's replacement so the organization doesn't have to even consider paying the 23-year-old when his contract is up.
The 45th overall pick in 2019, Roby spent most of his rookie season in the G League, where he put up modest numbers. So, it was a surprise last season when he started 34 of his 61 appearances for the Thunder. The second-year big averaged 8.7 points, 5.6 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.5 combined steals-plus-blocks in 23.4 minutes, leading to a per-game fantasy rank of 181. There's nothing to point to that Roby excels at, though his defensive numbers were solid. Still, it's not clear what Roby's pathway to a legitimate starting role is aside from potentially becoming a better three-point shooter -- he went 32-for-109 (29.4%) last season. That said, he doesn't exactly have real competition in the frontcourt. Derrick Favors is on the roster, but how much will he really play with OKC in a rebuild? Mike Muscala is also not an everyday player for OKC, and Darius Bazley is presumably in the other starting frontcourt spot. Fantasy managers in deep leagues can take a gamble on Roby, but should not expect anything to come from it. Given how the Thunder have operated in the past, it wouldn't be surprising for them to be already searching for Roby's replacement so the organization doesn't have to even consider paying the 23-year-old when his contract is up.
NY (G)
G
67
Min
25.5
FPTS
998.0
REB
160.0
AST
366.0
STL
53.0
BLK
21.0
TO
166.0
FGM
408.0
FGA
854.0
FTM
158.0
FTA
183.0
In early February of last season, Rose was traded from the Pistons to the Knicks, reuniting Rose with long-time coaching pal Tom Thibodeau. After the trade, Rose's minutes per game shot up from 22.8 with Detroit to 26.8 with New York. This off-season, the Knicks rewarded Rose with a new three-year deal. And then a few days later, New York signed point guard Kemba Walker to a two-year agreement. At 32 years of age and with a long injury history, Rose is probably better suited to be a backup. So the Walker addition is likely a good move for Rose's longevity. But sharing the point with Walker will probably result in a minute situation more similar to what Rose experienced in Detroit. Keep in mind, though, Walker missed 45 out of 144 games during his two years in Boston. We don't know yet if Walker's knee issues will ever be behind him. For New York, a franchise that has gone years without a quality court general, it must feel fantastic to have two established options. Another interesting aspect of Rose's Knicks stint from last year is the uptick he experienced in shooting accuracy. In 35 contests with New York, Rose shot an impressive 48.7 percent from the field and 41.1 percent from behind the arc. Thibodeau clearly knew how to leverage Rose's strengths. Expect solid veteran minutes from Rose once again in 2021-22.
In early February of last season, Rose was traded from the Pistons to the Knicks, reuniting Rose with long-time coaching pal Tom Thibodeau. After the trade, Rose's minutes per game shot up from 22.8 with Detroit to 26.8 with New York. This off-season, the Knicks rewarded Rose with a new three-year deal. And then a few days later, New York signed point guard Kemba Walker to a two-year agreement. At 32 years of age and with a long injury history, Rose is probably better suited to be a backup. So the Walker addition is likely a good move for Rose's longevity. But sharing the point with Walker will probably result in a minute situation more similar to what Rose experienced in Detroit. Keep in mind, though, Walker missed 45 out of 144 games during his two years in Boston. We don't know yet if Walker's knee issues will ever be behind him. For New York, a franchise that has gone years without a quality court general, it must feel fantastic to have two established options. Another interesting aspect of Rose's Knicks stint from last year is the uptick he experienced in shooting accuracy. In 35 contests with New York, Rose shot an impressive 48.7 percent from the field and 41.1 percent from behind the arc. Thibodeau clearly knew how to leverage Rose's strengths. Expect solid veteran minutes from Rose once again in 2021-22.
BOS (G)
G
71
Min
32.0
FPTS
997.0
REB
267.0
AST
322.0
STL
106.0
BLK
34.0
TO
122.0
FGM
295.0
FGA
748.0
FTM
150.0
FTA
186.0
The departure of Kemba Walker appeared to alter Marcus Smart's role with Boston, but then the C's added Dennis Schroder late in free agency. Now, heading into his eighth NBA season, Smart's role for 2021-22 is unclear. Will he slide over to become Boston's new starting point guard? Or will Schroder start at the point, allowing Smart to stay in his starting-wing-reserve-point-guard hybrid role which he has embraced the last few seasons? The latter situation seems more likely, though Smart is coming off a 2020-21 season in which he dished a career-high and team-best 5.7 assists per game. Smart as starting PG assumes Schroder returns to his off-the-bench, instant-offense role he had with OKC in 2019-20. Surprise sophomore point guard Payton Pritchard will also be part of the backcourt mix. The defensive-minded Smart has averaged 1.7 steals and 0.4 blocks per game over his past three seasons. He's the undisputed defensive leader for the C's and happy to guard bigger wings regardless of his offensive assignment. Smart's negatives include poor outside shooting and nagging injuries. Last season, he missed 19 games in February and March due to a calf injury and shot only 39.8 percent from the field. Overall, Smart seems likely to replicate his 2020-21 numbers in which he delivered career-highs in points (13.1) and assists, but struggled with his shot.
The departure of Kemba Walker appeared to alter Marcus Smart's role with Boston, but then the C's added Dennis Schroder late in free agency. Now, heading into his eighth NBA season, Smart's role for 2021-22 is unclear. Will he slide over to become Boston's new starting point guard? Or will Schroder start at the point, allowing Smart to stay in his starting-wing-reserve-point-guard hybrid role which he has embraced the last few seasons? The latter situation seems more likely, though Smart is coming off a 2020-21 season in which he dished a career-high and team-best 5.7 assists per game. Smart as starting PG assumes Schroder returns to his off-the-bench, instant-offense role he had with OKC in 2019-20. Surprise sophomore point guard Payton Pritchard will also be part of the backcourt mix. The defensive-minded Smart has averaged 1.7 steals and 0.4 blocks per game over his past three seasons. He's the undisputed defensive leader for the C's and happy to guard bigger wings regardless of his offensive assignment. Smart's negatives include poor outside shooting and nagging injuries. Last season, he missed 19 games in February and March due to a calf injury and shot only 39.8 percent from the field. Overall, Smart seems likely to replicate his 2020-21 numbers in which he delivered career-highs in points (13.1) and assists, but struggled with his shot.
ATL (G)
G
75
Min
29.4
FPTS
995.0
REB
286.0
AST
267.0
STL
79.0
BLK
34.0
TO
109.0
FGM
328.0
FGA
777.0
FTM
84.0
FTA
102.0
With the Hawks adding a ton of talent and depth during the 2020 offseason, Huerter's production took a slight step back. However, he was still plenty productive and crucial to Atlanta's gameplan. The third-year guard averaged 11.9 points, 3.5 assists, 3.3 rebounds and 1.2 steals in 30.8 minutes. He also made 2.0 threes per game at 36.3 percent. That resulted in Huerter ranking 122nd in fantasy on a per-game basis. Heading into 2021-22, Huerter's role shouldn't change significantly, as the Hawks practically made no moves in the offseason. There's potential for him to see fewer minutes if Cam Reddish takes a real step forward, but there's always a chance Huerter himself takes a step forward. De'Andre Hunter will also be healthy after missing much of last season, which impedes Huerter's path to easy playing time. Still, Huerter should be able to garner sixth-man minutes easily and provide some three-point shooting and secondary playmaking. His upside is relatively low, however, so he's more of a deep-league selection.
With the Hawks adding a ton of talent and depth during the 2020 offseason, Huerter's production took a slight step back. However, he was still plenty productive and crucial to Atlanta's gameplan. The third-year guard averaged 11.9 points, 3.5 assists, 3.3 rebounds and 1.2 steals in 30.8 minutes. He also made 2.0 threes per game at 36.3 percent. That resulted in Huerter ranking 122nd in fantasy on a per-game basis. Heading into 2021-22, Huerter's role shouldn't change significantly, as the Hawks practically made no moves in the offseason. There's potential for him to see fewer minutes if Cam Reddish takes a real step forward, but there's always a chance Huerter himself takes a step forward. De'Andre Hunter will also be healthy after missing much of last season, which impedes Huerter's path to easy playing time. Still, Huerter should be able to garner sixth-man minutes easily and provide some three-point shooting and secondary playmaking. His upside is relatively low, however, so he's more of a deep-league selection.
MIN (C)
G
77
Min
18.9
FPTS
986.0
REB
364.0
AST
103.0
STL
56.0
BLK
79.0
TO
65.0
FGM
310.0
FGA
632.0
FTM
132.0
FTA
185.0
Reid once again primarily played a backup role to Karl-Anthony Towns. The former saw 19.2 minutes per game and averaged 11.2 points, 4.6 rebounds, 1.6 combined blocks-plus-steals and 1.0 assists. His 4.9 percent block rate ranked ninth-highest in the NBA, and he was 15th in total blocks (76) despite playing just 1,347 minutes. He upgraded his efficiency significantly compared to his rookie year, shooting 52/35/69 for a true-shooting percentage of 59.9. Heading into 2021-22, his role shouldn't change unless the Timberwolves surprisingly start to play Towns and Reid together for significant minutes. They only spent 97 total minutes on the court together last season, and those lineups weren't effective. Fantasy managers in deep leagues have reason to consider Reid with a final pick given his quality per-minute production, but it would probably take an injury to Towns for the selection to pay off. Ultimately, Reid may be most valuable in keeper/dynasty leagues where managers can bank on the 22-year-old eventually finding himself in a better role on a different team.
Reid once again primarily played a backup role to Karl-Anthony Towns. The former saw 19.2 minutes per game and averaged 11.2 points, 4.6 rebounds, 1.6 combined blocks-plus-steals and 1.0 assists. His 4.9 percent block rate ranked ninth-highest in the NBA, and he was 15th in total blocks (76) despite playing just 1,347 minutes. He upgraded his efficiency significantly compared to his rookie year, shooting 52/35/69 for a true-shooting percentage of 59.9. Heading into 2021-22, his role shouldn't change unless the Timberwolves surprisingly start to play Towns and Reid together for significant minutes. They only spent 97 total minutes on the court together last season, and those lineups weren't effective. Fantasy managers in deep leagues have reason to consider Reid with a final pick given his quality per-minute production, but it would probably take an injury to Towns for the selection to pay off. Ultimately, Reid may be most valuable in keeper/dynasty leagues where managers can bank on the 22-year-old eventually finding himself in a better role on a different team.
NOR (G)
G
71
Min
26.9
FPTS
984.0
REB
186.0
AST
400.0
STL
58.0
BLK
8.0
TO
154.0
FGM
346.0
FGA
901.0
FTM
161.0
FTA
194.0
Graham was one of the best fantasy pickups of 2019-20, as he had a breakout season out of nowhere and ended up ranking 54th on a per-game basis. However, the Hornets selected Rookie of the Year, LaMelo Ball, in the 2020 Draft, which severely cut into Graham's usage and overall effectiveness. Despite seeing nearly the same workload, Graham dropped to 113th in fantasy with averages of 14.8 points, 5.4 assists and 2.7 rebounds. He also had an abysmal field-goal percentage, shooting just 37.7 percent from the field -- hardly better than his 37.5-percent mark from deep. Graham is one of the more unique point guards in the league, as he takes just 10 percent of his shots at the rim and makes them at an awful 41 percent mark. For reference, Terry Rozier -- not exactly known for his driving ability -- took 24 percent of his shots at the rim and made them at 58 percent. Regardless, Graham will have the opportunity for a bounceback season in 2021-22. During the offseason, he was sign-and-traded to the Pelicans, who sent Lonzo Ball to the Bulls. As a result, Graham will be the Pelicans' true starting point guard. Fantasy managers shouldn't expect an immediate jump back up to his 2019-20 numbers since Zion Williamson and Brandon Ingram will handle the ball plenty, but Graham is in position to improve upon his numbers from last season. He's worth an exploratory selection inside the top 100 for managers looking for upside.
Graham was one of the best fantasy pickups of 2019-20, as he had a breakout season out of nowhere and ended up ranking 54th on a per-game basis. However, the Hornets selected Rookie of the Year, LaMelo Ball, in the 2020 Draft, which severely cut into Graham's usage and overall effectiveness. Despite seeing nearly the same workload, Graham dropped to 113th in fantasy with averages of 14.8 points, 5.4 assists and 2.7 rebounds. He also had an abysmal field-goal percentage, shooting just 37.7 percent from the field -- hardly better than his 37.5-percent mark from deep. Graham is one of the more unique point guards in the league, as he takes just 10 percent of his shots at the rim and makes them at an awful 41 percent mark. For reference, Terry Rozier -- not exactly known for his driving ability -- took 24 percent of his shots at the rim and made them at 58 percent. Regardless, Graham will have the opportunity for a bounceback season in 2021-22. During the offseason, he was sign-and-traded to the Pelicans, who sent Lonzo Ball to the Bulls. As a result, Graham will be the Pelicans' true starting point guard. Fantasy managers shouldn't expect an immediate jump back up to his 2019-20 numbers since Zion Williamson and Brandon Ingram will handle the ball plenty, but Graham is in position to improve upon his numbers from last season. He's worth an exploratory selection inside the top 100 for managers looking for upside.
SAN (F)
G
73
Min
27.7
FPTS
984.0
REB
400.0
AST
149.0
STL
117.0
BLK
29.0
TO
130.0
FGM
354.0
FGA
764.0
FTM
55.0
FTA
92.0
Young had a nice bounceback season with the Bulls in 2020-21. The biggest reasons were career highs in field-goal percentage (55.9) and assists (4.3) per game. The assists were the biggest surprise, as Young had previously never averaged more than 2.5, but the Bulls were comfortable utilizing him as a distributor, and he played that role better than expected. The result was Young ranking 100th in per-game fantasy production -- a nice boost from the rank of 137th he had in 2019-20. However, he'll be on a different team in 2021-22, as he was dealt to San Antonio during the offseason. While Young doesn't fit the timeline of the rebuilding Spurs, the 33-year-old could be the first frontcourt player off the bench behind Keldon Johnson and Jakob Poeltl. If Young can find minutes in the mid-to-high 20s again this season, he should be fantasy relevant given how few established offensive options the Spurs have. He makes sense as a late draft flier in standard leagues.
Young had a nice bounceback season with the Bulls in 2020-21. The biggest reasons were career highs in field-goal percentage (55.9) and assists (4.3) per game. The assists were the biggest surprise, as Young had previously never averaged more than 2.5, but the Bulls were comfortable utilizing him as a distributor, and he played that role better than expected. The result was Young ranking 100th in per-game fantasy production -- a nice boost from the rank of 137th he had in 2019-20. However, he'll be on a different team in 2021-22, as he was dealt to San Antonio during the offseason. While Young doesn't fit the timeline of the rebuilding Spurs, the 33-year-old could be the first frontcourt player off the bench behind Keldon Johnson and Jakob Poeltl. If Young can find minutes in the mid-to-high 20s again this season, he should be fantasy relevant given how few established offensive options the Spurs have. He makes sense as a late draft flier in standard leagues.
MIA (G)
G
79
Min
31.6
FPTS
976.0
REB
268.0
AST
118.0
STL
40.0
BLK
22.0
TO
81.0
FGM
347.0
FGA
777.0
FTM
71.0
FTA
83.0
Practically overnight, Robinson became one of the league's best three-point shooters in 2019-20. He followed up that breakout campaign with another great effort in 2020-21. In his third season, the wing averaged 13.1 points while hitting 3.5 threes per game at 40.8 percent. He also contributed 3.5 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 31.4 minutes. Only two players have hit more threes than Robinson over the past two seasons (520) -- Damian Lillard (545) and Buddy Hield (553) -- but Robinson has the best percentage (42.7) of the trio. Despite Robinson doing little else on the court (though he's becoming an improved playmaker), he was able to rank 137th in per-game production last season. The Heat rewarded his production with a five-year, $90 million deal during the 2021 offseason -- the largest contract in NBA history for an undrafted player. Heading into 2021-22, nothing should change for the 27-year-old out of Michigan. He took 85 percent of his shots from beyond the arc last season, and that's where he'll continue to do his damage. There's room for him to make strides as a pick-and-roll ballhandler given his immense gravity as a shooter, but the Heat have plenty of other options who are more suited for that. Ultimately, Robinson is an extremely safe bet for fantasy managers in standard leagues with a final pick.
Practically overnight, Robinson became one of the league's best three-point shooters in 2019-20. He followed up that breakout campaign with another great effort in 2020-21. In his third season, the wing averaged 13.1 points while hitting 3.5 threes per game at 40.8 percent. He also contributed 3.5 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 31.4 minutes. Only two players have hit more threes than Robinson over the past two seasons (520) -- Damian Lillard (545) and Buddy Hield (553) -- but Robinson has the best percentage (42.7) of the trio. Despite Robinson doing little else on the court (though he's becoming an improved playmaker), he was able to rank 137th in per-game production last season. The Heat rewarded his production with a five-year, $90 million deal during the 2021 offseason -- the largest contract in NBA history for an undrafted player. Heading into 2021-22, nothing should change for the 27-year-old out of Michigan. He took 85 percent of his shots from beyond the arc last season, and that's where he'll continue to do his damage. There's room for him to make strides as a pick-and-roll ballhandler given his immense gravity as a shooter, but the Heat have plenty of other options who are more suited for that. Ultimately, Robinson is an extremely safe bet for fantasy managers in standard leagues with a final pick.
LAL (F)
G
75
Min
23.4
FPTS
968.0
REB
274.0
AST
253.0
STL
93.0
BLK
36.0
TO
130.0
FGM
293.0
FGA
615.0
FTM
166.0
FTA
210.0
Horton-Tucker showed considerable growth last season, upping his season averages to 9.0 points, 2.8 assists, 2.6 rebounds and 1.0 steals over 20.1 minutes per game. He emerged as one of the team's primary contributors when both LeBron James and Anthony Davis were forced to sit out with injury. For instance, during a nine-game stretch from April 2-19, THT posted per-game averages of 14.3 points, 3.8 dimes, 3.7 boards and 1.9 thefts. The Iowa State product's development earned him a three-year, $32 million contract from the organization in the offseason, and he'll presumably be the youngest player on the 15-man roster again next season. On most teams, a multi-year commitment to a rising talent would equate to ample playing time, but the Lakers have their eye on an NBA title and reloaded in the backcourt this summer, adding Russell Westbrook, Kendrick Nunn, Wayne Ellington, Malik Monk and Rajon Rondo. As such, Horton-Tucker may struggle to carve out enough playing time to make him a viable fantasy option.
Horton-Tucker showed considerable growth last season, upping his season averages to 9.0 points, 2.8 assists, 2.6 rebounds and 1.0 steals over 20.1 minutes per game. He emerged as one of the team's primary contributors when both LeBron James and Anthony Davis were forced to sit out with injury. For instance, during a nine-game stretch from April 2-19, THT posted per-game averages of 14.3 points, 3.8 dimes, 3.7 boards and 1.9 thefts. The Iowa State product's development earned him a three-year, $32 million contract from the organization in the offseason, and he'll presumably be the youngest player on the 15-man roster again next season. On most teams, a multi-year commitment to a rising talent would equate to ample playing time, but the Lakers have their eye on an NBA title and reloaded in the backcourt this summer, adding Russell Westbrook, Kendrick Nunn, Wayne Ellington, Malik Monk and Rajon Rondo. As such, Horton-Tucker may struggle to carve out enough playing time to make him a viable fantasy option.
SAN (F)
G
70
Min
29.0
FPTS
965.0
REB
271.0
AST
112.0
STL
23.0
BLK
8.0
TO
62.0
FGM
402.0
FGA
823.0
FTM
87.0
FTA
107.0
After six years of mediocre play, the 29-year-old put together the best campaign of his career last season. Coming into the 2020-21 season, McDermott had just 23 career starts under his belt, but he eclipsed that total in just one year after starting 29 games for Indiana. The sharpshooting forward posted career-highs in nearly every major category, as he averaged 13.6 points, 3.3 rebounds and 1.3 assists in 24.5 minutes per game while shooting 38.8 percent from beyond the arc. This was the most aggressive version of McDermott we'd seen, as his 10.1 field-goal attempts per game were his first time reaching double-digit tries in his career. The 6-foot-7 wing's improved play caught the attention of the Spurs, as both sides agreed on a three-year, $42 million deal in the offseason. McDermott enters San Antonio with a legit chance to improve upon his career year and potentially be in the starting lineup following the departures of DeMar DeRozan, Rudy Gay, and Trey Lyles. However, the Spurs do still have plenty of pieces at the forward position -- namely, the emerging Keldon Johnson and newly-acquired options Thaddeus Young and Zach Collins. Last year's first-round pick, Devin Vassell, is also entering his second season. So while McDermott will see competition for minutes, his three-point shooting ability (career 40.7% 3PT) should enable him to carve out a significant role. For fantasy purposes, however, McDermott is essentially a single-category specialist who doesn't offer much else.
After six years of mediocre play, the 29-year-old put together the best campaign of his career last season. Coming into the 2020-21 season, McDermott had just 23 career starts under his belt, but he eclipsed that total in just one year after starting 29 games for Indiana. The sharpshooting forward posted career-highs in nearly every major category, as he averaged 13.6 points, 3.3 rebounds and 1.3 assists in 24.5 minutes per game while shooting 38.8 percent from beyond the arc. This was the most aggressive version of McDermott we'd seen, as his 10.1 field-goal attempts per game were his first time reaching double-digit tries in his career. The 6-foot-7 wing's improved play caught the attention of the Spurs, as both sides agreed on a three-year, $42 million deal in the offseason. McDermott enters San Antonio with a legit chance to improve upon his career year and potentially be in the starting lineup following the departures of DeMar DeRozan, Rudy Gay, and Trey Lyles. However, the Spurs do still have plenty of pieces at the forward position -- namely, the emerging Keldon Johnson and newly-acquired options Thaddeus Young and Zach Collins. Last year's first-round pick, Devin Vassell, is also entering his second season. So while McDermott will see competition for minutes, his three-point shooting ability (career 40.7% 3PT) should enable him to carve out a significant role. For fantasy purposes, however, McDermott is essentially a single-category specialist who doesn't offer much else.
CHI (F)
G
79
Min
29.2
FPTS
965.0
REB
392.0
AST
136.0
STL
84.0
BLK
58.0
TO
121.0
FGM
299.0
FGA
632.0
FTM
123.0
FTA
162.0
Williams was a surprise selection at No. 4 in the 2020 NBA Draft, but he put together a nice rookie season as one of the youngest players in the league. The forward started all 71 games he appeared in and averaged 9.2 points, 4.6 rebounds, 1.4 assists and 1.5 combined steals-plus-blocks in 27.9 minutes. He was also relatively efficient with shooting splits of 48/39/73. That resulted in Williams ranking 185th in fantasy on a per-game basis, but his availability led to him ranking 113th in total production. He's farther along defensively than offensively, where he often relies on other players to put him in position to score, and he leans heavily on mid-range jumpers. Williams was given a long leash in 2021 Summer League, where he averaged 21.0 points on 19.3 shots per game. However, he wasn't especially efficient (37.9 FG%) and committed nearly twice as many turnovers than assists. Heading into 2021-22, the 20-year-old will likely remain in a low-usage offensive role, especially given the additions of Lonzo Ball and DeMar DeRozan. It's conceivable that he'll be worth a late-round flier in standard fantasy leagues, but a lot would have to break right for it to be worth rostering him over the course of a season. As it stands, he appears to just be a role player on a competitive team.
Williams was a surprise selection at No. 4 in the 2020 NBA Draft, but he put together a nice rookie season as one of the youngest players in the league. The forward started all 71 games he appeared in and averaged 9.2 points, 4.6 rebounds, 1.4 assists and 1.5 combined steals-plus-blocks in 27.9 minutes. He was also relatively efficient with shooting splits of 48/39/73. That resulted in Williams ranking 185th in fantasy on a per-game basis, but his availability led to him ranking 113th in total production. He's farther along defensively than offensively, where he often relies on other players to put him in position to score, and he leans heavily on mid-range jumpers. Williams was given a long leash in 2021 Summer League, where he averaged 21.0 points on 19.3 shots per game. However, he wasn't especially efficient (37.9 FG%) and committed nearly twice as many turnovers than assists. Heading into 2021-22, the 20-year-old will likely remain in a low-usage offensive role, especially given the additions of Lonzo Ball and DeMar DeRozan. It's conceivable that he'll be worth a late-round flier in standard fantasy leagues, but a lot would have to break right for it to be worth rostering him over the course of a season. As it stands, he appears to just be a role player on a competitive team.
TOR (G)
G
76
Min
25.1
FPTS
961.0
REB
248.0
AST
298.0
STL
79.0
BLK
12.0
TO
100.0
FGM
312.0
FGA
731.0
FTM
126.0
FTA
149.0
In 47 appearances, Flynn averaged a modest 7.5 points, 2.9 assists and 2.5 rebounds across 19.7 minutes per game during his first season in the NBA. The 2020 No. 29 overall pick finished well outside the top-200 fantasy scorers last year, but he finds himself in one of the most promising situations heading into next year. As the Raptors faded from the playoff picture last season, Flynn was the lone bright spot. In 14 starts in the second half of the season, the rookie averaged 14.9 points, 5.5 assists, 4.3 rebounds and 1.4 steals across 33.8 minutes per game. Over the final five games of the season, he posted 19.0 points, 4.8 rebounds, 4.8 assists and 1.6 steals in 35.8 minutes per game -- including back-to-back games with at least 25 points, five assists, four rebounds and two steals. With Kyle Lowry now in Miami, the Raptors have some decisions to make regarding their backcourt. Fred VanVleet and Gary Trent are likely in for sizable role upgrades as they command the starting spots, so that leaves Flynn to compete with veteran Goran Dragic and No. 4 overall pick Scottie Barnes for backup minutes. While the 23-year-old certainly is a longshot, he may become the favorite out of that trio if he can recapture some of the magic from his fantastic finish to the 2020-21 campaign.
In 47 appearances, Flynn averaged a modest 7.5 points, 2.9 assists and 2.5 rebounds across 19.7 minutes per game during his first season in the NBA. The 2020 No. 29 overall pick finished well outside the top-200 fantasy scorers last year, but he finds himself in one of the most promising situations heading into next year. As the Raptors faded from the playoff picture last season, Flynn was the lone bright spot. In 14 starts in the second half of the season, the rookie averaged 14.9 points, 5.5 assists, 4.3 rebounds and 1.4 steals across 33.8 minutes per game. Over the final five games of the season, he posted 19.0 points, 4.8 rebounds, 4.8 assists and 1.6 steals in 35.8 minutes per game -- including back-to-back games with at least 25 points, five assists, four rebounds and two steals. With Kyle Lowry now in Miami, the Raptors have some decisions to make regarding their backcourt. Fred VanVleet and Gary Trent are likely in for sizable role upgrades as they command the starting spots, so that leaves Flynn to compete with veteran Goran Dragic and No. 4 overall pick Scottie Barnes for backup minutes. While the 23-year-old certainly is a longshot, he may become the favorite out of that trio if he can recapture some of the magic from his fantastic finish to the 2020-21 campaign.
MIL (G)
G
71
Min
26.8
FPTS
960.0
REB
398.0
AST
193.0
STL
72.0
BLK
25.0
TO
113.0
FGM
274.0
FGA
619.0
FTM
81.0
FTA
108.0
DiVincenzo stepped into a full-time starting role with the Bucks last season. The third-year guard saw 27.5 minutes per game and posted career highs nearly across the board, averaging 10.4 points, 5.8 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 1.1 steals. He also made 2.0 threes per contest at a quality 37.9 percent. That resulted in him ranking 125th in fantasy on a per-game basis. However, DiVincenzo tore a ligament in his ankle during the first round of the playoffs, keeping him out for almost all of the Bucks' title run. He's reportedly ahead of schedule in his recovery, so it seems like there's a chance he'll be ready for the start of the season. It's a situation that fantasy managers should monitor. That said, once he is ready to step on the court, DiVincenzo should again start at shooting guard and see close to 30 minutes per night. He doesn't have significant competition at the position, though Pat Connaughton, Grayson Allen and George Hill will have their nights. Given Milwaukee's established offense of Giannis Antetokounmpo, Khris Middleton, Jrue Holiday and Brook Lopez, there isn't much room for DiVincenzo to take a massive leap forward. However, he's shown intriguing potential as a well-rounded, two-way player. For that reason, fantasy managers in standard leagues have justification to draft him with a last-round flier, but he'll likely be a better pick in deep leagues given that he's more of a high-floor player rather than a high-ceiling player.
DiVincenzo stepped into a full-time starting role with the Bucks last season. The third-year guard saw 27.5 minutes per game and posted career highs nearly across the board, averaging 10.4 points, 5.8 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 1.1 steals. He also made 2.0 threes per contest at a quality 37.9 percent. That resulted in him ranking 125th in fantasy on a per-game basis. However, DiVincenzo tore a ligament in his ankle during the first round of the playoffs, keeping him out for almost all of the Bucks' title run. He's reportedly ahead of schedule in his recovery, so it seems like there's a chance he'll be ready for the start of the season. It's a situation that fantasy managers should monitor. That said, once he is ready to step on the court, DiVincenzo should again start at shooting guard and see close to 30 minutes per night. He doesn't have significant competition at the position, though Pat Connaughton, Grayson Allen and George Hill will have their nights. Given Milwaukee's established offense of Giannis Antetokounmpo, Khris Middleton, Jrue Holiday and Brook Lopez, there isn't much room for DiVincenzo to take a massive leap forward. However, he's shown intriguing potential as a well-rounded, two-way player. For that reason, fantasy managers in standard leagues have justification to draft him with a last-round flier, but he'll likely be a better pick in deep leagues given that he's more of a high-floor player rather than a high-ceiling player.
OKC (F)
G
65
Min
30.9
FPTS
959.0
REB
485.0
AST
113.0
STL
41.0
BLK
33.0
TO
80.0
FGM
302.0
FGA
756.0
FTM
165.0
FTA
231.0
Bazley's impressive play in the NBA bubble two seasons ago led to many fantasy managers taking a gamble on him with a late pick last season. That didn't pay off. Bazley saw plenty of action (31.2 minutes per game) but he struggled with his shot and was woefully inefficient. He averaged 13.7 points but shot 39.6 percent from the field, 29.0 percent from three and 70.2 percent from the free-throw line. That led to 0.98 points per shot attempt -- in just the ninth percentile for players classified as forwards. However, on a positive note, his free-throw rate (3.2 attempts per game) was nice for someone who often relied on jumpshooting, and his rebounding (7.2 boards per game) was also productive. Despite his struggles, the 21-year-old's role isn't in too much jeopardy, as the Thunder remain committed to tanking and didn't add any frontcourt depth. Bazley will only really be competing with Isaiah Roby and Aleksej Pokusevski for minutes, and he should remain the starter at power forward. He'll need to take massive leaps in efficiency to be worth a roster spot in fantasy, however.
Bazley's impressive play in the NBA bubble two seasons ago led to many fantasy managers taking a gamble on him with a late pick last season. That didn't pay off. Bazley saw plenty of action (31.2 minutes per game) but he struggled with his shot and was woefully inefficient. He averaged 13.7 points but shot 39.6 percent from the field, 29.0 percent from three and 70.2 percent from the free-throw line. That led to 0.98 points per shot attempt -- in just the ninth percentile for players classified as forwards. However, on a positive note, his free-throw rate (3.2 attempts per game) was nice for someone who often relied on jumpshooting, and his rebounding (7.2 boards per game) was also productive. Despite his struggles, the 21-year-old's role isn't in too much jeopardy, as the Thunder remain committed to tanking and didn't add any frontcourt depth. Bazley will only really be competing with Isaiah Roby and Aleksej Pokusevski for minutes, and he should remain the starter at power forward. He'll need to take massive leaps in efficiency to be worth a roster spot in fantasy, however.
DAL (F)
G
74
Min
27.7
FPTS
958.0
REB
420.0
AST
95.0
STL
27.0
BLK
67.0
TO
63.0
FGM
256.0
FGA
557.0
FTM
84.0
FTA
101.0
Kleber continued to occupy a sixth-man role in the frontcourt for the Mavericks last season. He's also been a great insurance policy for when Kristaps Porzingis suffers an injury. He saw 26.8 minutes per game last season and averaged 7.1 points, 5.2 rebounds, 1.4 assists and 1.2 combined steals-plus-blocks. That led to him ranking 194th in per-game fantasy production. Kleber's role shouldn't change dramatically heading into 2021-22. However, there's a chance for a slight decrease, as the Mavericks added Moses Brown and Reggie Bullock during the offseason, who could potentially steal a few minutes from Kleber. Ultimately, Kleber is a low-usage offensive option who gets a bump when players ahead of him are injured, so he doesn't serve much of a use in anything but deep fantasy formats. In a best ball format, it could make sense to draft Kleber if you also drafted Porzingis earlier.
Kleber continued to occupy a sixth-man role in the frontcourt for the Mavericks last season. He's also been a great insurance policy for when Kristaps Porzingis suffers an injury. He saw 26.8 minutes per game last season and averaged 7.1 points, 5.2 rebounds, 1.4 assists and 1.2 combined steals-plus-blocks. That led to him ranking 194th in per-game fantasy production. Kleber's role shouldn't change dramatically heading into 2021-22. However, there's a chance for a slight decrease, as the Mavericks added Moses Brown and Reggie Bullock during the offseason, who could potentially steal a few minutes from Kleber. Ultimately, Kleber is a low-usage offensive option who gets a bump when players ahead of him are injured, so he doesn't serve much of a use in anything but deep fantasy formats. In a best ball format, it could make sense to draft Kleber if you also drafted Porzingis earlier.
CLE (G)
G
65
Min
26.8
FPTS
957.0
REB
260.0
AST
419.0
STL
81.0
BLK
9.0
TO
148.0
FGM
243.0
FGA
592.0
FTM
165.0
FTA
193.0
In late July of 2020, the Timberwolves traded Rubio to Cleveland for Taurean Prince. Rubio's second stint with Minnesota did not go as planned. The 10-year veteran posted per-game career lows in points (8.6) and minutes (26.1) per game, and he had his second-worst season in assists (6.4). Plus, after four years of shooting better than 40 percent from the field, Rubio's field goal percentage slipped to 38.5 percent, and he hit only 30.8 percent of his attempted three-pointers. In Cleveland, he's backing up two young studs in Darius Garland and Collin Sexton. Both guards are entering their age-22 seasons and averaged 33-plus minutes per game last year, so floor-time opportunities might be minor for Rubio. Remember, even though Sexton is the starting shooting guard, he still dished 4.4 assists per game last year and is capable of running the show. On the positive, Rubio is still a sneaky source for steals, as he's averaged 1.4 thefts per game over his past three seasons. Overall, though, a further decline in Rubio's counting stats seems likely.
In late July of 2020, the Timberwolves traded Rubio to Cleveland for Taurean Prince. Rubio's second stint with Minnesota did not go as planned. The 10-year veteran posted per-game career lows in points (8.6) and minutes (26.1) per game, and he had his second-worst season in assists (6.4). Plus, after four years of shooting better than 40 percent from the field, Rubio's field goal percentage slipped to 38.5 percent, and he hit only 30.8 percent of his attempted three-pointers. In Cleveland, he's backing up two young studs in Darius Garland and Collin Sexton. Both guards are entering their age-22 seasons and averaged 33-plus minutes per game last year, so floor-time opportunities might be minor for Rubio. Remember, even though Sexton is the starting shooting guard, he still dished 4.4 assists per game last year and is capable of running the show. On the positive, Rubio is still a sneaky source for steals, as he's averaged 1.4 thefts per game over his past three seasons. Overall, though, a further decline in Rubio's counting stats seems likely.
CLE (F)
G
77
Min
33.1
FPTS
951.0
REB
306.0
AST
148.0
STL
90.0
BLK
52.0
TO
137.0
FGM
374.0
FGA
826.0
FTM
169.0
FTA
232.0
When the Cavaliers drafted Okoro fifth overall in the 2020 NBA Draft, they knew they were drafting a defense-first wing with great athletic ability. Hopefully, he eventually helps with Cleveland's win total, but he will not benefit your fantasy squad. Okoro's rookie stats showed that offense was not his top priority. Over 32.4 minutes per game during his age-20 season, Okoro delivered averages of 9.6 points, 2.1 rebounds, 0.9 three-pointers, 0.8 steals and 0.4 blocks per contest. And in typical rookie fashion, he struggled with his shot, shooting 42.0 percent from the field and 29.0 percent from behind the arc. The poor three-point shooting is particularly disappointing in the modern 3-and-D era, but it is in line with the 28.6 percent he shot in college. That said, Okoro still made the All-Rookie second team, mostly based on his aggressive defense. Of course, at his young age, there is still plenty of room for improvement. And Cleveland's poor bench will not challenge Okoro for minutes, unless the Cavs intend to give Larry Nance major minutes at the three. Ultimately, Okoro will always be a third or fourth option on the offensive end, behind Darius Garland, Collin Sexton and, if healthy, Kevin Love. Look for gradual improvement from Okoro, but probably not enough of an upgrade to have a big fantasy impact.
When the Cavaliers drafted Okoro fifth overall in the 2020 NBA Draft, they knew they were drafting a defense-first wing with great athletic ability. Hopefully, he eventually helps with Cleveland's win total, but he will not benefit your fantasy squad. Okoro's rookie stats showed that offense was not his top priority. Over 32.4 minutes per game during his age-20 season, Okoro delivered averages of 9.6 points, 2.1 rebounds, 0.9 three-pointers, 0.8 steals and 0.4 blocks per contest. And in typical rookie fashion, he struggled with his shot, shooting 42.0 percent from the field and 29.0 percent from behind the arc. The poor three-point shooting is particularly disappointing in the modern 3-and-D era, but it is in line with the 28.6 percent he shot in college. That said, Okoro still made the All-Rookie second team, mostly based on his aggressive defense. Of course, at his young age, there is still plenty of room for improvement. And Cleveland's poor bench will not challenge Okoro for minutes, unless the Cavs intend to give Larry Nance major minutes at the three. Ultimately, Okoro will always be a third or fourth option on the offensive end, behind Darius Garland, Collin Sexton and, if healthy, Kevin Love. Look for gradual improvement from Okoro, but probably not enough of an upgrade to have a big fantasy impact.
LAC (G)
G
69
Min
29.6
FPTS
945.0
REB
309.0
AST
325.0
STL
67.0
BLK
32.0
TO
184.0
FGM
318.0
FGA
750.0
FTM
152.0
FTA
204.0
After nearly three full seasons in Milwaukee, Bledsoe was dealt to the Pelicans ahead of the 2020-21 campaign in the deal that sent Jrue Holiday to the Bucks. Bledsoe remained a starter in New Orleans, but he saw an overall role reduction. The point guard averaged 12.2 points, 3.8 assists and 3.4 rebounds in 29.7 minutes. He also shot a rough 42/34/69, which resulted in his worst true-shooting percentage (53.3%) since becoming a full-time starter in 2013-14. The result, unsurprisingly, was Bledsoe posting his worst per-game fantasy production (rank 203) since 2011-12 (rank 327). It was by far the worst per-minute production of his career (rank 304). Some of his woes may have been the result of being used more off-ball for the first time in his career, as he was forced to cater to the needs of Lonzo Ball, Zion Williamson and Brandon Ingram. Bledsoe is not an off-ball player considering his weak three-point percentage and lack of size. As a percentage of his overall shot attempts, Bledsoe shot the second-most corner threes of his career (11%) and had his fewest attempts at the rim (21%). His steal rate has also declined in each of the past three seasons. During the 2021 offseason, Bledsoe was dealt from the Pelicans to the Clippers, where he'll likely either back up Reggie Jackson or start at shooting guard. Either way, there's a good chance he spends a lot of time with the second unit, as he wouldn't often be running the show with the starters when flanked by Reggie Jackson and Paul George. There's an opportunity for Bledsoe to have somewhat of a revival, but it's also fair to wonder if the 31-year-old is hitting a wall due to decreasing athleticism and a poor shot.
After nearly three full seasons in Milwaukee, Bledsoe was dealt to the Pelicans ahead of the 2020-21 campaign in the deal that sent Jrue Holiday to the Bucks. Bledsoe remained a starter in New Orleans, but he saw an overall role reduction. The point guard averaged 12.2 points, 3.8 assists and 3.4 rebounds in 29.7 minutes. He also shot a rough 42/34/69, which resulted in his worst true-shooting percentage (53.3%) since becoming a full-time starter in 2013-14. The result, unsurprisingly, was Bledsoe posting his worst per-game fantasy production (rank 203) since 2011-12 (rank 327). It was by far the worst per-minute production of his career (rank 304). Some of his woes may have been the result of being used more off-ball for the first time in his career, as he was forced to cater to the needs of Lonzo Ball, Zion Williamson and Brandon Ingram. Bledsoe is not an off-ball player considering his weak three-point percentage and lack of size. As a percentage of his overall shot attempts, Bledsoe shot the second-most corner threes of his career (11%) and had his fewest attempts at the rim (21%). His steal rate has also declined in each of the past three seasons. During the 2021 offseason, Bledsoe was dealt from the Pelicans to the Clippers, where he'll likely either back up Reggie Jackson or start at shooting guard. Either way, there's a good chance he spends a lot of time with the second unit, as he wouldn't often be running the show with the starters when flanked by Reggie Jackson and Paul George. There's an opportunity for Bledsoe to have somewhat of a revival, but it's also fair to wonder if the 31-year-old is hitting a wall due to decreasing athleticism and a poor shot.
ORL (G)
G
73
Min
28.9
FPTS
937.0
REB
254.0
AST
292.0
STL
66.0
BLK
7.0
TO
216.0
FGM
421.0
FGA
1,000.0
FTM
189.0
FTA
224.0
Things were looking up for Anthony midway through his 2020-21 rookie season. Starting point guard Markelle Fultz suffered a torn ACL in early January and the Magic immediately inserted Anthony into the starting lineup. Through 17 consecutive starts, Anthony posted 12.1 points, 4.2 rebounds, 3.9 assists and 1.4 three-pointers over 29.1 minutes per game. But then a rib injury forced the rookie to miss 25 straight games. He returned and eventually earned back the starting spot. Over the last 17 games of the season, Anthony started every game and delivered 16.2 points and 5.1 boards per contest on a depleted Magic squad. The problem for Anthony this season is two-fold. First, Fultz returns from his injury probably in December and is expected to once again start. Second, the Magic pulled an illusion and drafted rising star Jalen Suggs with the fifth overall pick this summer. Plan A for Orlando is to give both Fultz and Suggs monster backcourt minutes as the team rebuilds. That would bump combo-guard Anthony back to a reserve role. That said, the Magic still lack depth and Fultz's injury issues are well documented. Worst case scenario is Orlando turns to Anthony as its points-off-the-bench gunner who should still see north of 22 minutes per contest. Expect the usual sophomore shooting improvement from Anthony, who only shot 39.7 percent as a rookie. But an increase in counting stats could be hard to come by if Fultz returns and stays healthy.
Things were looking up for Anthony midway through his 2020-21 rookie season. Starting point guard Markelle Fultz suffered a torn ACL in early January and the Magic immediately inserted Anthony into the starting lineup. Through 17 consecutive starts, Anthony posted 12.1 points, 4.2 rebounds, 3.9 assists and 1.4 three-pointers over 29.1 minutes per game. But then a rib injury forced the rookie to miss 25 straight games. He returned and eventually earned back the starting spot. Over the last 17 games of the season, Anthony started every game and delivered 16.2 points and 5.1 boards per contest on a depleted Magic squad. The problem for Anthony this season is two-fold. First, Fultz returns from his injury probably in December and is expected to once again start. Second, the Magic pulled an illusion and drafted rising star Jalen Suggs with the fifth overall pick this summer. Plan A for Orlando is to give both Fultz and Suggs monster backcourt minutes as the team rebuilds. That would bump combo-guard Anthony back to a reserve role. That said, the Magic still lack depth and Fultz's injury issues are well documented. Worst case scenario is Orlando turns to Anthony as its points-off-the-bench gunner who should still see north of 22 minutes per contest. Expect the usual sophomore shooting improvement from Anthony, who only shot 39.7 percent as a rookie. But an increase in counting stats could be hard to come by if Fultz returns and stays healthy.
CHI (G)
G
68
Min
27.2
FPTS
935.0
REB
254.0
AST
262.0
STL
65.0
BLK
7.0
TO
120.0
FGM
341.0
FGA
814.0
FTM
125.0
FTA
143.0
White parlayed a strong end to his rookie campaign into a near-full-time starting role with the Bulls last season. He saw 31.2 minutes per game and averaged 15.1 points, 4.8 assists and 4.1 rebounds. White had some big games as well, with three 30-point games and three performances with at least 10 assists. The end result was White ranking 121st in fantasy on a per-game basis -- not bad, but also not quite up to the expectations some had for him. White may have a difficult time building on that in 2021-22. During the offseason, the Bulls brought in Lonzo Ball and Alex Caruso, not to mention DeMar DeRozan. Plus, Zach LaVine is still around and will take up plenty of usage. There's now a wealth of guard depth in Chicago, and it's not clear where White fits in. He should be an everyday player, but it's highly unlikely he starts, and it seems like the best he could hope for is sixth-man minutes. At 21 years old, White is still a strong dynasty/keeper option, but his value in redraft leagues this season is relatively low. He's probably best suited for deep leagues in which backup guards can still hold a roster spot.
White parlayed a strong end to his rookie campaign into a near-full-time starting role with the Bulls last season. He saw 31.2 minutes per game and averaged 15.1 points, 4.8 assists and 4.1 rebounds. White had some big games as well, with three 30-point games and three performances with at least 10 assists. The end result was White ranking 121st in fantasy on a per-game basis -- not bad, but also not quite up to the expectations some had for him. White may have a difficult time building on that in 2021-22. During the offseason, the Bulls brought in Lonzo Ball and Alex Caruso, not to mention DeMar DeRozan. Plus, Zach LaVine is still around and will take up plenty of usage. There's now a wealth of guard depth in Chicago, and it's not clear where White fits in. He should be an everyday player, but it's highly unlikely he starts, and it seems like the best he could hope for is sixth-man minutes. At 21 years old, White is still a strong dynasty/keeper option, but his value in redraft leagues this season is relatively low. He's probably best suited for deep leagues in which backup guards can still hold a roster spot.
TOR (F)
G
76
Min
27.7
FPTS
934.0
REB
358.0
AST
228.0
STL
91.0
BLK
28.0
TO
112.0
FGM
289.0
FGA
657.0
FTM
96.0
FTA
145.0
Barnes was somewhat of a surprising pick by the Raptors at No. 4, but there's no question that he has the frame and skill set to develop into the best defender in the draft. At 6-foot-9, 230 pounds, Barnes has the body of a forward, but he spent most of his time at point guard as a freshman at Florida State last season. The major knock on Barnes is that he's a poor shooter (27.5% 3PT; 62.1% FT last season), but he's an effective finisher at the rim who can rebound, pass, block shots and defend virtually any position. Long-term, Toronto's hope is that it can develop Barnes into the next evolution of Draymond Green, but Barnes may not have a major fantasy impact in his rookie season. Concerns about the jumpshot aside, Barnes joins a talented roster that already features Pascal Siakam, OG Anunoby, and Precious Achiuwa up front, with Fred VanVleet, Goran Dragic and Malachi Flynn as options at point guard. Nick Nurse will find a role for Barnes, but his fantasy floor is not as high as the other elite prospects in the 2021 Draft class.
Barnes was somewhat of a surprising pick by the Raptors at No. 4, but there's no question that he has the frame and skill set to develop into the best defender in the draft. At 6-foot-9, 230 pounds, Barnes has the body of a forward, but he spent most of his time at point guard as a freshman at Florida State last season. The major knock on Barnes is that he's a poor shooter (27.5% 3PT; 62.1% FT last season), but he's an effective finisher at the rim who can rebound, pass, block shots and defend virtually any position. Long-term, Toronto's hope is that it can develop Barnes into the next evolution of Draymond Green, but Barnes may not have a major fantasy impact in his rookie season. Concerns about the jumpshot aside, Barnes joins a talented roster that already features Pascal Siakam, OG Anunoby, and Precious Achiuwa up front, with Fred VanVleet, Goran Dragic and Malachi Flynn as options at point guard. Nick Nurse will find a role for Barnes, but his fantasy floor is not as high as the other elite prospects in the 2021 Draft class.
NY (G)
G
58
Min
29.2
FPTS
925.0
REB
211.0
AST
261.0
STL
47.0
BLK
27.0
TO
114.0
FGM
327.0
FGA
780.0
FTM
161.0
FTA
184.0
After two challenging seasons in Boston, Walker returns home to NYC and the Knicks. In mid-June, 2020, the Celtics sent Walker and a 2021 first-round pick to Oklahoma City for Al Horford, Moses Brown and a 2025 second-round pick. Then late in the free agency period, OKC decided to buy out Walker and the Knicks quickly signed the speedy veteran. The pairing makes a lot of sense. New York lacked talent at the point guard position and had lots of cap space. Walker was an unrestricted free agent who can now revitalize his career on a playoff squad in his hometown. The big question with the 31-year-old veteran is health. With Boston, Walker missed 45 out of 144 regular season games. Most of those absences were due to a tricky knee issue that also forced him to miss two of Boston's five 2021 playoff games. Fortunately, with former-MVP Derrick Rose backing up Walker at point guard, New York can afford to rest Walker when need be. Coach Thibodeau loves to give his starters extended minutes and is also a huge Rose supporter. Those traits are in conflict when deciding whether Walker's 31.8 minutes per game from last season will go up or down. Regardless, on a Knicks squad anxious to find scoring punch in the backcourt, expect Walker to continue his aggressive shooting approach and his three-year average of 21.8 points per game. Keep in mind though, Walker hasn't averaged six or more assists per game since 2013-14 with Charlotte. If Walker's health can improve, the four-time All-Star could have a big season with the Knickerbockers.
After two challenging seasons in Boston, Walker returns home to NYC and the Knicks. In mid-June, 2020, the Celtics sent Walker and a 2021 first-round pick to Oklahoma City for Al Horford, Moses Brown and a 2025 second-round pick. Then late in the free agency period, OKC decided to buy out Walker and the Knicks quickly signed the speedy veteran. The pairing makes a lot of sense. New York lacked talent at the point guard position and had lots of cap space. Walker was an unrestricted free agent who can now revitalize his career on a playoff squad in his hometown. The big question with the 31-year-old veteran is health. With Boston, Walker missed 45 out of 144 regular season games. Most of those absences were due to a tricky knee issue that also forced him to miss two of Boston's five 2021 playoff games. Fortunately, with former-MVP Derrick Rose backing up Walker at point guard, New York can afford to rest Walker when need be. Coach Thibodeau loves to give his starters extended minutes and is also a huge Rose supporter. Those traits are in conflict when deciding whether Walker's 31.8 minutes per game from last season will go up or down. Regardless, on a Knicks squad anxious to find scoring punch in the backcourt, expect Walker to continue his aggressive shooting approach and his three-year average of 21.8 points per game. Keep in mind though, Walker hasn't averaged six or more assists per game since 2013-14 with Charlotte. If Walker's health can improve, the four-time All-Star could have a big season with the Knickerbockers.
SAC (F)
G
59
Min
26.5
FPTS
909.0
REB
438.0
AST
62.0
STL
28.0
BLK
41.0
TO
84.0
FGM
313.0
FGA
639.0
FTM
125.0
FTA
176.0
Bagley has failed to live up to expectations that come with being the No. 2 overall pick, as he was in 2018. Staying on the court has been the primary issue for the forward, as he's appeared in just 118 games across his first three seasons. Last season was Bagley's worst from a per-game fantasy perspective, where he ranked 230th, and a per-minute perspective, where he ranked 289th. In 25.9 minutes, he averaged 14.1 points, 7.4 rebounds and 1.0 assists. On a positive note, he showed off an improved three-point shot, going 37-of-108 for a career-high 34.3 percent. The 2021-22 season is huge for Bagley, as it's his final season before entering restricted free agency. There's a good chance he starts at power forward unless coach Luke Walton decides to surprisingly start all three of De'Aaron Fox, Tyrese Haliburton and Buddy Hield, which would probably result in Harrison Barnes sliding up to power forward. Ultimately, Bagley needs to make strides as an efficient shooter to start becoming an impactful player. Adding some playmaking ability and defensive stats would be a plus as well, but in the modern pace-and-space era, Bagley being able to convert open threes would go a long way. It would be understandable for fantasy managers in standard leagues to take a gamble on Bagley hoping for some long-awaited payoff in a contract year.
Bagley has failed to live up to expectations that come with being the No. 2 overall pick, as he was in 2018. Staying on the court has been the primary issue for the forward, as he's appeared in just 118 games across his first three seasons. Last season was Bagley's worst from a per-game fantasy perspective, where he ranked 230th, and a per-minute perspective, where he ranked 289th. In 25.9 minutes, he averaged 14.1 points, 7.4 rebounds and 1.0 assists. On a positive note, he showed off an improved three-point shot, going 37-of-108 for a career-high 34.3 percent. The 2021-22 season is huge for Bagley, as it's his final season before entering restricted free agency. There's a good chance he starts at power forward unless coach Luke Walton decides to surprisingly start all three of De'Aaron Fox, Tyrese Haliburton and Buddy Hield, which would probably result in Harrison Barnes sliding up to power forward. Ultimately, Bagley needs to make strides as an efficient shooter to start becoming an impactful player. Adding some playmaking ability and defensive stats would be a plus as well, but in the modern pace-and-space era, Bagley being able to convert open threes would go a long way. It would be understandable for fantasy managers in standard leagues to take a gamble on Bagley hoping for some long-awaited payoff in a contract year.
IND (G)
G
67
Min
22.8
FPTS
904.0
REB
218.0
AST
409.0
STL
92.0
BLK
13.0
TO
115.0
FGM
229.0
FGA
443.0
FTM
38.0
FTA
48.0
The scrappy point guard is coming off of a strong 2020-21 season in which he led the league in total steals (128) and ranked second in steals per game (1.9). That category alone propelled McConnell to the best fantasy campaign of his career, but he also chipped in 6.6 assists and 3.7 rebounds per game while shooting a career-best 55.9 percent from the field. The one major knock on McConnell is that he doesn't shoot threes -- he's made only 20 over the last two seasons -- but the lack of an outside game preserves his elite field goal percentage -- especially by point guard standards. McConnell could take a slight step back this season if Malcolm Brogdon and Caris LeVert are able to stay healthy. The Pacers also added another NBA-ready guard in Chris Duarte via the draft, so McConnell likely won't reach last season's workload (26.0 per game) on a nightly basis.
The scrappy point guard is coming off of a strong 2020-21 season in which he led the league in total steals (128) and ranked second in steals per game (1.9). That category alone propelled McConnell to the best fantasy campaign of his career, but he also chipped in 6.6 assists and 3.7 rebounds per game while shooting a career-best 55.9 percent from the field. The one major knock on McConnell is that he doesn't shoot threes -- he's made only 20 over the last two seasons -- but the lack of an outside game preserves his elite field goal percentage -- especially by point guard standards. McConnell could take a slight step back this season if Malcolm Brogdon and Caris LeVert are able to stay healthy. The Pacers also added another NBA-ready guard in Chris Duarte via the draft, so McConnell likely won't reach last season's workload (26.0 per game) on a nightly basis.
DET (F)
G
77
Min
28.9
FPTS
904.0
REB
245.0
AST
130.0
STL
72.0
BLK
14.0
TO
72.0
FGM
340.0
FGA
817.0
FTM
137.0
FTA
161.0
The Pistons grabbed Bey with the 19th pick in the 2020 NBA Draft. Detroit believed they were selecting a sharpshooter with length, and Bey did not disappoint. The 6-foot-7 wing drained 175 three-pointers in his rookie season -- tops amongst all rookies. He also shot 38.0 percent from behind the arc, which was good for seventh amongst rookies with at least 65 attempts. Bey's 857 total points were also second amongst rookies. Of course, most NBA freshmen were playing on squads with more talent than the rebuilding Pistons. When Detroit bought out Blake Griffin in mid-February, Bey was named the starter. In his 53 starts, Bey delivered 13.6 points, 4.9 boards, 2.7 three-pointers and 0.9 steals over 30.8 minutes per game. Bey is likey the starter at small forward heading into the 2021-22 season unless coach Dwane Casey starts Kelly Olynyk at the four and Jerami Grant at the three. Either way, he'll fight off reserves Hamidou Diallo and Josh Jackson in an effort to continue seeing more than 30 minutes per contest, which seems likely. Expect the usual sophomore shooting improvement from Bey this season. During his last season at Villanova, the wing shot 47.7 percent from the field. So an improvement on his rookie season's 40.4 percent seems likely. Gradual improvement in most counting stats also seems likely as the 22-year-old and the Pistons continue to improve.
The Pistons grabbed Bey with the 19th pick in the 2020 NBA Draft. Detroit believed they were selecting a sharpshooter with length, and Bey did not disappoint. The 6-foot-7 wing drained 175 three-pointers in his rookie season -- tops amongst all rookies. He also shot 38.0 percent from behind the arc, which was good for seventh amongst rookies with at least 65 attempts. Bey's 857 total points were also second amongst rookies. Of course, most NBA freshmen were playing on squads with more talent than the rebuilding Pistons. When Detroit bought out Blake Griffin in mid-February, Bey was named the starter. In his 53 starts, Bey delivered 13.6 points, 4.9 boards, 2.7 three-pointers and 0.9 steals over 30.8 minutes per game. Bey is likey the starter at small forward heading into the 2021-22 season unless coach Dwane Casey starts Kelly Olynyk at the four and Jerami Grant at the three. Either way, he'll fight off reserves Hamidou Diallo and Josh Jackson in an effort to continue seeing more than 30 minutes per contest, which seems likely. Expect the usual sophomore shooting improvement from Bey this season. During his last season at Villanova, the wing shot 47.7 percent from the field. So an improvement on his rookie season's 40.4 percent seems likely. Gradual improvement in most counting stats also seems likely as the 22-year-old and the Pistons continue to improve.
LAC (F)
G
71
Min
29.8
FPTS
904.0
REB
359.0
AST
105.0
STL
51.0
BLK
33.0
TO
106.0
FGM
342.0
FGA
805.0
FTM
165.0
FTA
198.0
Last year marked Morris' first full season with the Clippers after being traded there from the Knicks in 2019-20. Morris played a sixth-man role, starting 29 of his 57 appearances and averaging 13.4 points, 4.1 rebounds and 1.0 assists in 26.4 minutes. He also shot an impressive 47/47/82. The result was the veteran ranking 156th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- quite the dip from his 2019-20 mark of 95th, though that wasn't unexpected. That said, Morris should have a better campaign in 2021-22. Kawhi Leonard (knee) could be out the whole season, which would make Morris a legitimate starter at forward with potential to see 30 minutes per game in addition to increased usage. In fact, with Leonard off the court last season, Morris averaged 20.5 points, 5.6 rebounds, 1.5 assists and 1.1 steals per 36 minutes. That level of scoring probably won't be reached, but it seems fair to expect Morris to be on the positive side of 15 points per game. The forward's upside is still relatively low given his recent production and team context, but fantasy managers in deep leagues have plenty of reason to take Morris with a final draft pick.
Last year marked Morris' first full season with the Clippers after being traded there from the Knicks in 2019-20. Morris played a sixth-man role, starting 29 of his 57 appearances and averaging 13.4 points, 4.1 rebounds and 1.0 assists in 26.4 minutes. He also shot an impressive 47/47/82. The result was the veteran ranking 156th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- quite the dip from his 2019-20 mark of 95th, though that wasn't unexpected. That said, Morris should have a better campaign in 2021-22. Kawhi Leonard (knee) could be out the whole season, which would make Morris a legitimate starter at forward with potential to see 30 minutes per game in addition to increased usage. In fact, with Leonard off the court last season, Morris averaged 20.5 points, 5.6 rebounds, 1.5 assists and 1.1 steals per 36 minutes. That level of scoring probably won't be reached, but it seems fair to expect Morris to be on the positive side of 15 points per game. The forward's upside is still relatively low given his recent production and team context, but fantasy managers in deep leagues have plenty of reason to take Morris with a final draft pick.
TOR (G)
G
66
Min
25.8
FPTS
901.0
REB
208.0
AST
274.0
STL
41.0
BLK
10.0
TO
147.0
FGM
345.0
FGA
792.0
FTM
190.0
FTA
235.0
After seven seasons with the Heat, Dragic was dealt to Toronto in August as part of the sign-and-trade deal that routed Kyle Lowry to Miami. It remains to be seen how likely the 35-year-old Dragic is to stay with the probably-rebuilding Raptors. After the move, the guard made some since recanted disparaging comments about his aspirations not matching up with Toronto. A larger concern might be The Dragon's health. Over the past three seasons, Dragic has missed roughly 82 games due to injury. Ankle and back issues forced Dragic to appear in 50 out of 72 games last year. Dragic also scored in single-digits in 15 of those 50 games. Should Dragic stay in Toronto, he'll clearly be below Fred VanVleet and Gary Trent in the backcourt pecking order. The Raptors are committed to FVV and Trent long-term, while Dragic is on a one-year deal. Despite Dragic's advanced age, he's still a sharpshooter from deep who can also create opportunities for others. Over his last five seasons in Miami, Dragic drained 37.5 percent of this three-point attempts and averaged 5.0 dimes per game. He shot 37.3 percent from behind the arc last season. Whether with the Raptors or elsewhere, accurate shooting and playmaking are always in demand. In Toronto, he'll have lots of opportunities to excel, as their bench lacks scoring options. But if he's dealt to a contender, the 13-year veteran will be hard pressed to match last year's 26.7 minutes per game.
After seven seasons with the Heat, Dragic was dealt to Toronto in August as part of the sign-and-trade deal that routed Kyle Lowry to Miami. It remains to be seen how likely the 35-year-old Dragic is to stay with the probably-rebuilding Raptors. After the move, the guard made some since recanted disparaging comments about his aspirations not matching up with Toronto. A larger concern might be The Dragon's health. Over the past three seasons, Dragic has missed roughly 82 games due to injury. Ankle and back issues forced Dragic to appear in 50 out of 72 games last year. Dragic also scored in single-digits in 15 of those 50 games. Should Dragic stay in Toronto, he'll clearly be below Fred VanVleet and Gary Trent in the backcourt pecking order. The Raptors are committed to FVV and Trent long-term, while Dragic is on a one-year deal. Despite Dragic's advanced age, he's still a sharpshooter from deep who can also create opportunities for others. Over his last five seasons in Miami, Dragic drained 37.5 percent of this three-point attempts and averaged 5.0 dimes per game. He shot 37.3 percent from behind the arc last season. Whether with the Raptors or elsewhere, accurate shooting and playmaking are always in demand. In Toronto, he'll have lots of opportunities to excel, as their bench lacks scoring options. But if he's dealt to a contender, the 13-year veteran will be hard pressed to match last year's 26.7 minutes per game.
BOS (C)
G
66
Min
21.5
FPTS
900.0
REB
336.0
AST
199.0
STL
39.0
BLK
59.0
TO
59.0
FGM
255.0
FGA
552.0
FTM
48.0
FTA
59.0
Horford should be well rested for his return to Boston. The 35-year-old center hasn't played since Mar. 24th when the Thunder decided to sit the aging veteran to maximize his trade value, let younger players develop and improve their draft odds. And less will be expected from Horford during his second stint with the Celtics. Boston clearly wants the younger Robert Williams to shine at center, with Horford playing a role as both mentor and potential back-up. Considering Williams has missed roughly 70 games to injury over the past three seasons, Big Al will surely have multiple opportunities as a starter regardless of who lands the gig on Day 1. Some have mentioned that Horford could also see time backing up Jayson Tatum at the four. While that's a possibility, we know Horford's time at power forward didn't go well when he was in Philadelphia. Though, with new coach Ime Udoka running the show, anything is possible. Horford will be leaned on for his defensive leadership, which might help Boston in the win column, but won't show up in the box score. When Horford was in Boston in 2018-19, he started 68 games and posted 13.6 points, 6.7 rebounds and 4.2 assists over 29 minutes per game while shooting very well from the field. The veteran might post similar per-minute production this season, but expect much fewer minutes per game unless Williams suffers a major injury.
Horford should be well rested for his return to Boston. The 35-year-old center hasn't played since Mar. 24th when the Thunder decided to sit the aging veteran to maximize his trade value, let younger players develop and improve their draft odds. And less will be expected from Horford during his second stint with the Celtics. Boston clearly wants the younger Robert Williams to shine at center, with Horford playing a role as both mentor and potential back-up. Considering Williams has missed roughly 70 games to injury over the past three seasons, Big Al will surely have multiple opportunities as a starter regardless of who lands the gig on Day 1. Some have mentioned that Horford could also see time backing up Jayson Tatum at the four. While that's a possibility, we know Horford's time at power forward didn't go well when he was in Philadelphia. Though, with new coach Ime Udoka running the show, anything is possible. Horford will be leaned on for his defensive leadership, which might help Boston in the win column, but won't show up in the box score. When Horford was in Boston in 2018-19, he started 68 games and posted 13.6 points, 6.7 rebounds and 4.2 assists over 29 minutes per game while shooting very well from the field. The veteran might post similar per-minute production this season, but expect much fewer minutes per game unless Williams suffers a major injury.
MIL (F)
G
74
Min
23.1
FPTS
898.0
REB
415.0
AST
120.0
STL
39.0
BLK
22.0
TO
90.0
FGM
323.0
FGA
723.0
FTM
88.0
FTA
114.0
While Portis saw the third-fewest minutes per game of his career (20.8) with the Bucks last season, it was his most impactful campaign as a pro. Portis played a crucial sixth-man role in the Bucks' run to an NBA title. Shooting efficiency was the greatest area of improvement for Portis. The big man shot 52/47/74 en route to 11.4 points per game. He also remained one of the league's best per-minute rebounders. His 7.1 boards per game translated to a 17.9 total rebound percentage, which ranked 12th-best in the NBA. All together, that resulted in Portis ranking 129th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- tied for the second-highest mark of his career. Somewhat surprisingly, the Bucks were able to retain the 26-year-old heading into the 2021-22 season. He should again be in line for minutes in the low-20s, though it wouldn't be surprising to see him receive a slight uptick if Brook Lopez starts to show signs of aging at 33 years old. Considering Portis is not in an advantageous situation for fantasy, he can probably be avoided in standard drafts. However, managers in deeper leagues can take him after pick 100 as a high-floor big, especially when it comes to rebounding.
While Portis saw the third-fewest minutes per game of his career (20.8) with the Bucks last season, it was his most impactful campaign as a pro. Portis played a crucial sixth-man role in the Bucks' run to an NBA title. Shooting efficiency was the greatest area of improvement for Portis. The big man shot 52/47/74 en route to 11.4 points per game. He also remained one of the league's best per-minute rebounders. His 7.1 boards per game translated to a 17.9 total rebound percentage, which ranked 12th-best in the NBA. All together, that resulted in Portis ranking 129th in fantasy on a per-game basis -- tied for the second-highest mark of his career. Somewhat surprisingly, the Bucks were able to retain the 26-year-old heading into the 2021-22 season. He should again be in line for minutes in the low-20s, though it wouldn't be surprising to see him receive a slight uptick if Brook Lopez starts to show signs of aging at 33 years old. Considering Portis is not in an advantageous situation for fantasy, he can probably be avoided in standard drafts. However, managers in deeper leagues can take him after pick 100 as a high-floor big, especially when it comes to rebounding.
LAC (F)
G
70
Min
28.3
FPTS
895.0
REB
333.0
AST
212.0
STL
67.0
BLK
31.0
TO
66.0
FGM
214.0
FGA
476.0
FTM
34.0
FTA
39.0
In his age-32 campaign, Batum enjoyed a career revival as a durable and reliable veteran presence for the Clippers last season, tying for second on the team with 67 games played and ranking behind only Kawhi Leonard and Paul George with 27.4 minutes per contest. He spent time at both forward positions and even worked as a small-ball center when called upon, providing versatility that extended his real-life value beyond his statistical output. Batum's per-game numbers included 8.1 points, 4.7 rebounds, 2.2 assists, 1.6 three-pointers and 1.0 steals. He converted 46.4 percent of his field-goal attempts, 40.4 percent of his tries from three-point range and 82.8 percent of his free throws while turning the ball over at a rate of just 0.8 per game. While nothing about Batum's production screams fantasy difference-maker, he contributed just enough across multiple categories to be rosterable at times during the season, particularly early on when he was part of the starting unit. He should be good for similar production during the upcoming campaign after re-signing with the Clippers in August, and he could take on an even greater offensive role with Kawhi Leonard on the shelf until at least February. Batum isn't going to be a must-roster player in most leagues, but he could be worth a late-round pick in nine-category formats.
In his age-32 campaign, Batum enjoyed a career revival as a durable and reliable veteran presence for the Clippers last season, tying for second on the team with 67 games played and ranking behind only Kawhi Leonard and Paul George with 27.4 minutes per contest. He spent time at both forward positions and even worked as a small-ball center when called upon, providing versatility that extended his real-life value beyond his statistical output. Batum's per-game numbers included 8.1 points, 4.7 rebounds, 2.2 assists, 1.6 three-pointers and 1.0 steals. He converted 46.4 percent of his field-goal attempts, 40.4 percent of his tries from three-point range and 82.8 percent of his free throws while turning the ball over at a rate of just 0.8 per game. While nothing about Batum's production screams fantasy difference-maker, he contributed just enough across multiple categories to be rosterable at times during the season, particularly early on when he was part of the starting unit. He should be good for similar production during the upcoming campaign after re-signing with the Clippers in August, and he could take on an even greater offensive role with Kawhi Leonard on the shelf until at least February. Batum isn't going to be a must-roster player in most leagues, but he could be worth a late-round pick in nine-category formats.
MEM (F)
G
69
Min
20.4
FPTS
893.0
REB
374.0
AST
88.0
STL
56.0
BLK
52.0
TO
60.0
FGM
262.0
FGA
481.0
FTM
90.0
FTA
125.0
After a strong rookie season, Clarke fell victim to the dreaded sophomore slump. His efficiency fell across the board, and he was a worse rebounder despite seeing more minutes. The result was Clarke's fantasy ranking dropping from 106th to 141st on a per-game basis due to his 10.3 points, 5.6 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 1.9 combined steals-plus-blocks. He continued to play a backup role behind the likes of Jaren Jackson, Jonas Valanciunas and Kyle Anderson. That shouldn't change this season, though Steven Adams has replaced Valanciunas. There's reason to be optimistic regarding Clarke's upside for those in dynasty and keeper leagues, but fantasy managers in redraft formats probably don't need to consider Clarke except in deep formats. His potential is heavily reliant on players ahead of him getting injured, which is never a good thing to bank on.
After a strong rookie season, Clarke fell victim to the dreaded sophomore slump. His efficiency fell across the board, and he was a worse rebounder despite seeing more minutes. The result was Clarke's fantasy ranking dropping from 106th to 141st on a per-game basis due to his 10.3 points, 5.6 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 1.9 combined steals-plus-blocks. He continued to play a backup role behind the likes of Jaren Jackson, Jonas Valanciunas and Kyle Anderson. That shouldn't change this season, though Steven Adams has replaced Valanciunas. There's reason to be optimistic regarding Clarke's upside for those in dynasty and keeper leagues, but fantasy managers in redraft formats probably don't need to consider Clarke except in deep formats. His potential is heavily reliant on players ahead of him getting injured, which is never a good thing to bank on.
PHO (F)
G
75
Min
27.0
FPTS
891.0
REB
375.0
AST
154.0
STL
78.0
BLK
26.0
TO
75.0
FGM
252.0
FGA
628.0
FTM
72.0
FTA
95.0
Crowder signed a three-year, $29.2 million deal with the Suns last offseason and instantly became a fan favorite. A prototypical role player, Crowder brought value to the young Suns last season with his veteran leadership and energy, as well as his ability to defend multiple positions and space the floor. When the Suns and Bucks met in the Finals, Crowder brought much-needed experience as the only player on either teams' roster to have appeared in a previous Finals (he was with Miami in 2020). In 2021-22, Crowder will return for his second season with the Suns, but the aging veteran may face more competition for floor time than he did last year. Although Dario Saric will still be out for the foreseeable future, the emergence of Cam Johnson during last season's playoffs and Jalen Smith during the Summer League means Crowder could lose minutes and potentially even his starting job. Crowder can provide you with solid threes (he hit 2.5 per game last year) and rebounds (4.7 last season), but he hurts you in field goal percentage (40.4% last year and 41.9% career) and points (just 10.1 last year and 9.6 career). Crowder's value in 2021-22 may be more in the intangibles he brings to the Suns rather than his fantasy production.
Crowder signed a three-year, $29.2 million deal with the Suns last offseason and instantly became a fan favorite. A prototypical role player, Crowder brought value to the young Suns last season with his veteran leadership and energy, as well as his ability to defend multiple positions and space the floor. When the Suns and Bucks met in the Finals, Crowder brought much-needed experience as the only player on either teams' roster to have appeared in a previous Finals (he was with Miami in 2020). In 2021-22, Crowder will return for his second season with the Suns, but the aging veteran may face more competition for floor time than he did last year. Although Dario Saric will still be out for the foreseeable future, the emergence of Cam Johnson during last season's playoffs and Jalen Smith during the Summer League means Crowder could lose minutes and potentially even his starting job. Crowder can provide you with solid threes (he hit 2.5 per game last year) and rebounds (4.7 last season), but he hurts you in field goal percentage (40.4% last year and 41.9% career) and points (just 10.1 last year and 9.6 career). Crowder's value in 2021-22 may be more in the intangibles he brings to the Suns rather than his fantasy production.
UTA (F)
G
69
Min
22.0
FPTS
889.0
REB
361.0
AST
118.0
STL
36.0
BLK
34.0
TO
91.0
FGM
289.0
FGA
619.0
FTM
120.0
FTA
141.0
Over the past four seasons, Gay established himself as a solid veteran bench option at forward with the Spurs. During those four seasons, he averaged 11.9 points, 5.6 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 23.0 minutes and held an average per-game fantasy rank of 152. He'll be joining a new team in 2021-22 after inking a contract with the Jazz. Gay will essentially act as a replacement for Georges Niang, who signed with the 76ers during the offseason. Gay should continue to see backup minutes at both forward spots, which could set him up for minutes in the low-20s again. Assuming that's the case, the 35-year-old will only be fantasy-relevant in deep leagues.
Over the past four seasons, Gay established himself as a solid veteran bench option at forward with the Spurs. During those four seasons, he averaged 11.9 points, 5.6 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 23.0 minutes and held an average per-game fantasy rank of 152. He'll be joining a new team in 2021-22 after inking a contract with the Jazz. Gay will essentially act as a replacement for Georges Niang, who signed with the 76ers during the offseason. Gay should continue to see backup minutes at both forward spots, which could set him up for minutes in the low-20s again. Assuming that's the case, the 35-year-old will only be fantasy-relevant in deep leagues.
HOU (C)
G
67
Min
22.6
FPTS
885.0
REB
432.0
AST
75.0
STL
21.0
BLK
50.0
TO
84.0
FGM
284.0
FGA
566.0
FTM
122.0
FTA
176.0
One of the most intriguing big men in the 2021 NBA Draft, Sengun landing with a rebuilding team puts him in an advantageous fantasy situation. While he'll take a backseat to Christian Wood and free agent signee Daniel Theis, Sengun's path to a consistent role is relatively clear. After averaging a double-double with 3.0 blocks per game in Summer League, Sengun has built up some momentum, and he'll be a name worth monitoring as the Rockets' rotation takes shape early in the season. Sengun, who turned 19 just days before the Draft, averaged 18.9 points, 8.7 rebounds, 2.7 assists, 1.6 blocks and 1.3 steals in 37 games for Turkish club Besiktas last season. If he's able to secure a decent workload as a rookie, Sengun could be worth a speculative bench spot in standard leagues.
One of the most intriguing big men in the 2021 NBA Draft, Sengun landing with a rebuilding team puts him in an advantageous fantasy situation. While he'll take a backseat to Christian Wood and free agent signee Daniel Theis, Sengun's path to a consistent role is relatively clear. After averaging a double-double with 3.0 blocks per game in Summer League, Sengun has built up some momentum, and he'll be a name worth monitoring as the Rockets' rotation takes shape early in the season. Sengun, who turned 19 just days before the Draft, averaged 18.9 points, 8.7 rebounds, 2.7 assists, 1.6 blocks and 1.3 steals in 37 games for Turkish club Besiktas last season. If he's able to secure a decent workload as a rookie, Sengun could be worth a speculative bench spot in standard leagues.
ORL (F)
G
72
Min
27.6
FPTS
882.0
REB
234.0
AST
86.0
STL
81.0
BLK
25.0
TO
74.0
FGM
345.0
FGA
850.0
FTM
167.0
FTA
194.0
Injuries limited Ross to just 46 games last season, but he had a strong campaign when healthy. In 29.3 minutes per game, he averaged 15.6 points, 3.4 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.0 steals. The result was Ross finishing as the 120th-best fantasy player on a per-game basis -- his third straight season inside the top 125. At the trade deadline last season, the Magic began a full rebuild, sending off Nikola Vucevic to the Bulls. Now, Ross is one of the oldest players on the team at 30 years old. That complicates his role for 2021-22, as the priority for the organization is clearly developing young talent. As a guard/wing, Ross will be competing for playing time with a myriad of players, including rookie Jalen Suggs, Gary Harris, R.J. Hampton, Chuma Okeke and Jonathan Isaac (once he's healthy). There's still a pathway for Ross to see minutes in the mid-to-upper 20s and be a consistent threat for 20 points given his microwave-scorer abilities, but drafting Ross is riskier than in recent seasons due to the direction of the team. He's probably only a deep-league target, as he doesn't provide much upside but has a solid floor if he can see sixth-man minutes.
Injuries limited Ross to just 46 games last season, but he had a strong campaign when healthy. In 29.3 minutes per game, he averaged 15.6 points, 3.4 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.0 steals. The result was Ross finishing as the 120th-best fantasy player on a per-game basis -- his third straight season inside the top 125. At the trade deadline last season, the Magic began a full rebuild, sending off Nikola Vucevic to the Bulls. Now, Ross is one of the oldest players on the team at 30 years old. That complicates his role for 2021-22, as the priority for the organization is clearly developing young talent. As a guard/wing, Ross will be competing for playing time with a myriad of players, including rookie Jalen Suggs, Gary Harris, R.J. Hampton, Chuma Okeke and Jonathan Isaac (once he's healthy). There's still a pathway for Ross to see minutes in the mid-to-upper 20s and be a consistent threat for 20 points given his microwave-scorer abilities, but drafting Ross is riskier than in recent seasons due to the direction of the team. He's probably only a deep-league target, as he doesn't provide much upside but has a solid floor if he can see sixth-man minutes.
NY (C)
G
68
Min
24.5
FPTS
881.0
REB
444.0
AST
51.0
STL
87.0
BLK
135.0
TO
98.0
FGM
164.0
FGA
264.0
FTM
53.0
FTA
73.0
Last season, Noel was cruising as the Knicks back-up center through the first 27 games of the season, posting a quaint 3.5 points, 5.2 rebounds and 2.0 blocks per contest. But then starter Mitchell Robinson missed almost all of the remaining season due to hand and foot injuries. Noel suddenly started 41 games and boosted his numbers to 5.9 points, 7.0 boards and 2.3 blocks a game, while shooting 64.6 percent from the field. Entering the 2021-22 season, we still don't know when Robinson will return from his late-March surgery to fix the broken bone in his right foot. Knowing this, the Knicks wisely signed Noel to a three-year agreement. Noel will presumably begin the year as New York's starting center. That said, with the addition of guards Kemba Walker and Evan Fournier, head coach Tom Thibodeau finally has a deep enough roster to play more small-ball with Julius Randle at the center. Knowing Thibodeau's love for tight defense and rim protection, the Knicks might only resort to that tactic for the occasional change-of-pace burst. The 27-year-old Noel enters the season as an under-the-radar big with an opportunity to exceed the modest numbers of his past few seasons.
Last season, Noel was cruising as the Knicks back-up center through the first 27 games of the season, posting a quaint 3.5 points, 5.2 rebounds and 2.0 blocks per contest. But then starter Mitchell Robinson missed almost all of the remaining season due to hand and foot injuries. Noel suddenly started 41 games and boosted his numbers to 5.9 points, 7.0 boards and 2.3 blocks a game, while shooting 64.6 percent from the field. Entering the 2021-22 season, we still don't know when Robinson will return from his late-March surgery to fix the broken bone in his right foot. Knowing this, the Knicks wisely signed Noel to a three-year agreement. Noel will presumably begin the year as New York's starting center. That said, with the addition of guards Kemba Walker and Evan Fournier, head coach Tom Thibodeau finally has a deep enough roster to play more small-ball with Julius Randle at the center. Knowing Thibodeau's love for tight defense and rim protection, the Knicks might only resort to that tactic for the occasional change-of-pace burst. The 27-year-old Noel enters the season as an under-the-radar big with an opportunity to exceed the modest numbers of his past few seasons.
GS (C)
G
60
Min
25.0
FPTS
875.0
REB
392.0
AST
59.0
STL
28.0
BLK
65.0
TO
84.0
FGM
323.0
FGA
627.0
FTM
105.0
FTA
157.0
The second overall pick in the 2020 NBA Draft, Wiseman's rookie season was somewhat of a disappointment. He appeared in just 39 games (27 starts) due to multiple injuries and COVID-19 protocols, and he tore his meniscus in mid-April. The center saw 21.4 minutes per game and averaged 11.5 points, 5.8 rebounds and a combined 1.2 blocks-plus-steals. He shot a solid 51.9 percent from the field and showed off some ability to stretch the floor by going 12-of-38 (31.6%) from deep. While the overall numbers are underwhelming, it's important to remember the context of Wiseman's rookie season. He played just three collegiate games, didn't get a Summer League and missed much of training camp due to what is presumed to be an absence due to contracting COVID-19. Wiseman's offensive repertoire also doesn't mesh well alongside Draymond Green, who isn't a floor-spacer and spends much of his time at center. The Warriors also boast a great, but complicated system that isn't easy to integrate into, especially for a 19-year-old basically playing his first competitive basketball since his senior year of high school. The reasons to believe in Wiseman's potential are still there -- mainly, the elite athleticism that will lead to easy lob dunks and sets him up for good block numbers. Bigger questions remain about his shooting ability and potential to post up, but those are skills Wiseman has plenty of time to develop as a now-20-year-old. The fit with the Warriors is still subpar, but his pedigree makes him worthy of consideration with the final pick in a standard fantasy draft.
The second overall pick in the 2020 NBA Draft, Wiseman's rookie season was somewhat of a disappointment. He appeared in just 39 games (27 starts) due to multiple injuries and COVID-19 protocols, and he tore his meniscus in mid-April. The center saw 21.4 minutes per game and averaged 11.5 points, 5.8 rebounds and a combined 1.2 blocks-plus-steals. He shot a solid 51.9 percent from the field and showed off some ability to stretch the floor by going 12-of-38 (31.6%) from deep. While the overall numbers are underwhelming, it's important to remember the context of Wiseman's rookie season. He played just three collegiate games, didn't get a Summer League and missed much of training camp due to what is presumed to be an absence due to contracting COVID-19. Wiseman's offensive repertoire also doesn't mesh well alongside Draymond Green, who isn't a floor-spacer and spends much of his time at center. The Warriors also boast a great, but complicated system that isn't easy to integrate into, especially for a 19-year-old basically playing his first competitive basketball since his senior year of high school. The reasons to believe in Wiseman's potential are still there -- mainly, the elite athleticism that will lead to easy lob dunks and sets him up for good block numbers. Bigger questions remain about his shooting ability and potential to post up, but those are skills Wiseman has plenty of time to develop as a now-20-year-old. The fit with the Warriors is still subpar, but his pedigree makes him worthy of consideration with the final pick in a standard fantasy draft.
BRO (G)
G
74
Min
25.4
FPTS
870.0
REB
315.0
AST
265.0
STL
82.0
BLK
33.0
TO
115.0
FGM
220.0
FGA
458.0
FTM
104.0
FTA
137.0
While Brown saw a role reduction last season while going from the Pistons to the Nets, he was able to be a legitimate impact player on a Finals contender. The 6-foot-4, multi-tooled, multi-position player saw 22.3 minutes per game and averaged 8.8 points, 5.4 rebounds and 1.6 assists. He also saw 25.1 minutes in the second round of the Playoffs against the Bucks, when he averaged 8.7 points, 4.7 rebounds and 2.3 assists while shooting 52.8 percent from the field. Brown often played a big-man role on offense for Brooklyn, functioning as a pick-and-roll partner with the team's playmakers. He's also one of the best offensive rebounders in the NBA for his size, grabbing 2.8 per 36 minutes. Heading into 2021-22, Brown's role should remain steady. That means the 25-year-old probably won't be worth a spot in most redraft leagues, though fantasy managers in deep formats can always snatch him with a final spot for a high-floor player. He's also intriguing for keeper/dynasty formats, but he'll likely need a change of scenery for there to be any sort of payoff for hanging onto him.
While Brown saw a role reduction last season while going from the Pistons to the Nets, he was able to be a legitimate impact player on a Finals contender. The 6-foot-4, multi-tooled, multi-position player saw 22.3 minutes per game and averaged 8.8 points, 5.4 rebounds and 1.6 assists. He also saw 25.1 minutes in the second round of the Playoffs against the Bucks, when he averaged 8.7 points, 4.7 rebounds and 2.3 assists while shooting 52.8 percent from the field. Brown often played a big-man role on offense for Brooklyn, functioning as a pick-and-roll partner with the team's playmakers. He's also one of the best offensive rebounders in the NBA for his size, grabbing 2.8 per 36 minutes. Heading into 2021-22, Brown's role should remain steady. That means the 25-year-old probably won't be worth a spot in most redraft leagues, though fantasy managers in deep formats can always snatch him with a final spot for a high-floor player. He's also intriguing for keeper/dynasty formats, but he'll likely need a change of scenery for there to be any sort of payoff for hanging onto him.
BRO (F)
G
66
Min
24.8
FPTS
866.0
REB
336.0
AST
152.0
STL
43.0
BLK
31.0
TO
74.0
FGM
242.0
FGA
493.0
FTM
102.0
FTA
133.0
Griffin started last season injured and ineffective for the Pistons and was an extremely quick drop candidate for fantasy managers who took a chance on him. Eventually, he agreed to a buyout with Detroit in early March. A few days later, he signed with Brooklyn. Griffin made his team debut March 21, and he went on to appear in 26 games for the Nets in a significantly reduced role. In 21.5 minutes per game, the six-time All-Star averaged 10.0 points, 4.7 rebounds and 2.4 assists. That resulted in Griffin ranking just 174th in per-game production from his debut to the end of the season. During the 2021 offseason, Griffin agreed to return to Brooklyn on a one-year contract. The days of Griffin running an offense and creating great looks for himself and his teammates at a high usage rate are over. The 32-year-old is officially a role piece on a contender, able to do a little bit of everything and knock down his easy looks. Barring some catastrophic injury scenario for the Nets, there's probably not a world in which Griffin is fantasy relevant in standard leagues. And since he's still an injury risk, he's even a gamble in deep formats before pick 150.
Griffin started last season injured and ineffective for the Pistons and was an extremely quick drop candidate for fantasy managers who took a chance on him. Eventually, he agreed to a buyout with Detroit in early March. A few days later, he signed with Brooklyn. Griffin made his team debut March 21, and he went on to appear in 26 games for the Nets in a significantly reduced role. In 21.5 minutes per game, the six-time All-Star averaged 10.0 points, 4.7 rebounds and 2.4 assists. That resulted in Griffin ranking just 174th in per-game production from his debut to the end of the season. During the 2021 offseason, Griffin agreed to return to Brooklyn on a one-year contract. The days of Griffin running an offense and creating great looks for himself and his teammates at a high usage rate are over. The 32-year-old is officially a role piece on a contender, able to do a little bit of everything and knock down his easy looks. Barring some catastrophic injury scenario for the Nets, there's probably not a world in which Griffin is fantasy relevant in standard leagues. And since he's still an injury risk, he's even a gamble in deep formats before pick 150.
NY (G)
G
75
Min
25.0
FPTS
864.0
REB
301.0
AST
155.0
STL
66.0
BLK
18.0
TO
97.0
FGM
295.0
FGA
708.0
FTM
146.0
FTA
171.0
After playing with five teams in two years from 2018 to 2020, Burks signed a one-year deal with the Knicks last season. He quickly established his ability to score as a key bench piece for New York, posting 12.7 points and 2.1 three-pointers over 25.6 minutes per game. The Knicks re-signed Burks to a three-year agreement this August, locking up the guard/wing as a key points-off-the-bench player in tandem with fellow veteran reserve Derrick Rose. But Burks now finds himself on a much deeper Knicks squad that added scorers Kemba Walker and Evan Fournier this summer. Fournier is an upgrade over departed Reggie Bullock at shooting guard. And Fournier can play both wing spots, which will presumably eat into Burks' minutes. Walker and Fournier averaged a combined 28.6 field goals per game last year and, clearly, all those shots will take away scoring opportunities from Burks. In other words, the days of pass-first guards Elfrid Payton and Frank Ntilikina are long gone. As a volume shooter, Burks has never been particularly accurate. He hasn't shot better than 42.1 percent from the field since 2013-14. Burks will continue to spell the improving RJ Barrett at small forward. But expect Burks' 25.6 minutes per contest from last year to decrease slightly in 2021-22 with a subsequent shortfall in counting stats.
After playing with five teams in two years from 2018 to 2020, Burks signed a one-year deal with the Knicks last season. He quickly established his ability to score as a key bench piece for New York, posting 12.7 points and 2.1 three-pointers over 25.6 minutes per game. The Knicks re-signed Burks to a three-year agreement this August, locking up the guard/wing as a key points-off-the-bench player in tandem with fellow veteran reserve Derrick Rose. But Burks now finds himself on a much deeper Knicks squad that added scorers Kemba Walker and Evan Fournier this summer. Fournier is an upgrade over departed Reggie Bullock at shooting guard. And Fournier can play both wing spots, which will presumably eat into Burks' minutes. Walker and Fournier averaged a combined 28.6 field goals per game last year and, clearly, all those shots will take away scoring opportunities from Burks. In other words, the days of pass-first guards Elfrid Payton and Frank Ntilikina are long gone. As a volume shooter, Burks has never been particularly accurate. He hasn't shot better than 42.1 percent from the field since 2013-14. Burks will continue to spell the improving RJ Barrett at small forward. But expect Burks' 25.6 minutes per contest from last year to decrease slightly in 2021-22 with a subsequent shortfall in counting stats.
CLE (F)
G
55
Min
28.5
FPTS
859.0
REB
435.0
AST
157.0
STL
29.0
BLK
17.0
TO
123.0
FGM
262.0
FGA
628.0
FTM
83.0
FTA
99.0
Over the past three season, the longest consecutive games steak delivered by Love was 19 contests. And even then, he played only 26 minutes per game and shot 41.0 percent from the field. In other words, the 32-year-old veteran has struggled to stay healthy. The problem was further illuminated this July when Love opted out of Team USA Olympic competition due to a troubling calf injury. Last season, Love played a career-low 24.9 minutes per game and appeared in only 25 games. He also grabbed a career-worst 7.4 rebounds per game. Expect those rebound numbers to continue to fall with the Cavs adding 7-footers Evan Mobley, via the Draft, and Lauri Markkanen, via a sign-and-trade. With Mobley's slight frame and center Jarrett Allen having signed a new five-year contract, the rookie Mobley should see lots of development time at Love's usual power forward spot. Markkanen signed a four-year agreement, so clearly the Cavs are invested in him as well. That all said, Love can still drain three-pointers. The 13-year veteran hit 2.3 triples per game last year, his sixth straight season of making 2.1 or more three-pointers per contest. While Love owns a championship ring and has great name recognition, he can no longer be relied on to deliver consistent fantasy stats.
Over the past three season, the longest consecutive games steak delivered by Love was 19 contests. And even then, he played only 26 minutes per game and shot 41.0 percent from the field. In other words, the 32-year-old veteran has struggled to stay healthy. The problem was further illuminated this July when Love opted out of Team USA Olympic competition due to a troubling calf injury. Last season, Love played a career-low 24.9 minutes per game and appeared in only 25 games. He also grabbed a career-worst 7.4 rebounds per game. Expect those rebound numbers to continue to fall with the Cavs adding 7-footers Evan Mobley, via the Draft, and Lauri Markkanen, via a sign-and-trade. With Mobley's slight frame and center Jarrett Allen having signed a new five-year contract, the rookie Mobley should see lots of development time at Love's usual power forward spot. Markkanen signed a four-year agreement, so clearly the Cavs are invested in him as well. That all said, Love can still drain three-pointers. The 13-year veteran hit 2.3 triples per game last year, his sixth straight season of making 2.1 or more three-pointers per contest. While Love owns a championship ring and has great name recognition, he can no longer be relied on to deliver consistent fantasy stats.
TOR (G)
G
71
Min
31.7
FPTS
858.0
REB
169.0
AST
103.0
STL
81.0
BLK
27.0
TO
35.0
FGM
351.0
FGA
835.0
FTM
105.0
FTA
126.0
After two and a half seasons in Portland, Trent was dealt at last year's trade deadline to the Raptors. With Toronto, Trent started 15 of 17 games and posted 16.2 points, 3.6 rebounds, 1.1 steals and 2.6 made threes over 31.8 minutes per game. With Kyle Lowry moving on to Miami, the Raptors quickly decided Trent should be their new starting shooting guard and signed him to a three-year deal. Fred VanVleet will slide over from shooting guard to point guard. Trent is particularly appealing when you consider 2021-22 will be only his age-22 season. With only 47 career starts under Trent's belt, there is clearly room for growth. And with Pascal Siakam suffering from shoulder surgery and rumored to be on the trading block, there is a good chance that Trent will be forced to shoot more. Speaking of trades, one must wonder about the newly-acquired Goran Dragic's future. Dragic came to Toronto as part of the Lowry sign-and-trade deal. He has expressed an interest in playing elsewhere and his age (35) doesn't match well with Toronto's young core. Should Dragic stick around and stay healthy, he'll certainly eat into Trent's minutes. But if Dragic is dealt, Trent will be further entrenched in Toronto's core lineup. A bigger worry with Trent is that outside of points and three-pointers, he offers little production. This is especially true if he again shoots 40.8 percent from the field as he did last year versus the 44.4 percent he shot in 2019-20. In nine-category leagues, Trent's career average of only 0.5 turnovers per game is appealing. Trent has only averaged 23.9 minutes per game during his three-year career. He'll most likely play significantly more during his first full season with the Raptors.
After two and a half seasons in Portland, Trent was dealt at last year's trade deadline to the Raptors. With Toronto, Trent started 15 of 17 games and posted 16.2 points, 3.6 rebounds, 1.1 steals and 2.6 made threes over 31.8 minutes per game. With Kyle Lowry moving on to Miami, the Raptors quickly decided Trent should be their new starting shooting guard and signed him to a three-year deal. Fred VanVleet will slide over from shooting guard to point guard. Trent is particularly appealing when you consider 2021-22 will be only his age-22 season. With only 47 career starts under Trent's belt, there is clearly room for growth. And with Pascal Siakam suffering from shoulder surgery and rumored to be on the trading block, there is a good chance that Trent will be forced to shoot more. Speaking of trades, one must wonder about the newly-acquired Goran Dragic's future. Dragic came to Toronto as part of the Lowry sign-and-trade deal. He has expressed an interest in playing elsewhere and his age (35) doesn't match well with Toronto's young core. Should Dragic stick around and stay healthy, he'll certainly eat into Trent's minutes. But if Dragic is dealt, Trent will be further entrenched in Toronto's core lineup. A bigger worry with Trent is that outside of points and three-pointers, he offers little production. This is especially true if he again shoots 40.8 percent from the field as he did last year versus the 44.4 percent he shot in 2019-20. In nine-category leagues, Trent's career average of only 0.5 turnovers per game is appealing. Trent has only averaged 23.9 minutes per game during his three-year career. He'll most likely play significantly more during his first full season with the Raptors.
IND (G)
G
78
Min
27.4
FPTS
855.0
REB
278.0
AST
109.0
STL
102.0
BLK
54.0
TO
51.0
FGM
243.0
FGA
569.0
FTM
62.0
FTA
78.0
Holiday shifted into a mostly-starting role for the Pacers last season, but his numbers changed only marginally, and his fantasy value was practically identical to 2019-20. The 3-and-D wing averaged 10.5 points, 3.6 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 1.6 combined steals-plus-blocks in 30.3 minutes, leading to a per-game fantasy rank of 142. However, his excellent availability -- not missing a game -- led to him ranking 87th in total production. Heading into 2021-22, Holiday's role shouldn't change dramatically. That said, if the team stays healthier -- namely, T.J. Warren and Jeremy Lamb -- Holiday could see a smaller role. That dynamic shouldn't affect fantasy managers in standard leagues, as Holiday on the fringes of 12-team relevance. Managers in deep leagues should keep the aforementioned playing time threat in mind, though. He should still make for a fine late-round option, but his ceiling is low, and he's really only useful for threes and steals.
Holiday shifted into a mostly-starting role for the Pacers last season, but his numbers changed only marginally, and his fantasy value was practically identical to 2019-20. The 3-and-D wing averaged 10.5 points, 3.6 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 1.6 combined steals-plus-blocks in 30.3 minutes, leading to a per-game fantasy rank of 142. However, his excellent availability -- not missing a game -- led to him ranking 87th in total production. Heading into 2021-22, Holiday's role shouldn't change dramatically. That said, if the team stays healthier -- namely, T.J. Warren and Jeremy Lamb -- Holiday could see a smaller role. That dynamic shouldn't affect fantasy managers in standard leagues, as Holiday on the fringes of 12-team relevance. Managers in deep leagues should keep the aforementioned playing time threat in mind, though. He should still make for a fine late-round option, but his ceiling is low, and he's really only useful for threes and steals.
NOR (G)
G
77
Min
22.1
FPTS
852.0
REB
238.0
AST
293.0
STL
102.0
BLK
34.0
TO
203.0
FGM
284.0
FGA
668.0
FTM
158.0
FTA
198.0
The 2020 first-round selection's season was nothing too spectacular, but Lewis did show real signs of being a legitimate NBA talent. The Alabama product averaged 6.4 points, 1.3 rebounds and 2.3 assists per game in 16.7 minutes. Lewis was playing behind Lonzo Ball in the offense, but even with Ball going to Chicago, there will still be competition for playing time this season. The team sign-and-traded for Devonte' Graham and also acquired veteran point guard Tomas Satoransky. However, it seems pretty safe that the Pelicans will opt to play Lewis more than he did in his rookie season as he continues his development. To take the next step as a player Lewis will need to improve on his 33.3 percent mark from three and become a better playmaker. However, his raw athletic ability should come to his favor as he enters Year 2. The 6-foot-1 speedster will look to be more involved in the offense this season, but the team's new look point guard situation still may hamper his fantasy impact for the 2020-21 season.
The 2020 first-round selection's season was nothing too spectacular, but Lewis did show real signs of being a legitimate NBA talent. The Alabama product averaged 6.4 points, 1.3 rebounds and 2.3 assists per game in 16.7 minutes. Lewis was playing behind Lonzo Ball in the offense, but even with Ball going to Chicago, there will still be competition for playing time this season. The team sign-and-traded for Devonte' Graham and also acquired veteran point guard Tomas Satoransky. However, it seems pretty safe that the Pelicans will opt to play Lewis more than he did in his rookie season as he continues his development. To take the next step as a player Lewis will need to improve on his 33.3 percent mark from three and become a better playmaker. However, his raw athletic ability should come to his favor as he enters Year 2. The 6-foot-1 speedster will look to be more involved in the offense this season, but the team's new look point guard situation still may hamper his fantasy impact for the 2020-21 season.
NOR (G)
G
71
Min
23.2
FPTS
843.0
REB
232.0
AST
322.0
STL
73.0
BLK
6.0
TO
119.0
FGM
227.0
FGA
502.0
FTM
104.0
FTA
123.0
After two seasons in Chicago, Satoransky was shipped to New Orleans over the summer as part of the Lonzo Ball sign-and-trade. He'll join Devonte' Graham, Nickeil Alexander-Walker, Garrett Temple and Kira Lewis in a crowded Pelicans' backcourt that may be difficult to get a read on. Realistically, all five players could compete for a starting spot under new head coach Willie Green, though Satoransky's ability to play both guard positions is a notch in his favor. Regardless of whether he starts or comes off the bench, if Satoransky can lock in 25-plus minutes per night, he could return low-end value in standard leagues. Two seasons ago, Satoransky finished inside the top 110 in eight-category leagues behind 9.9 points, 3.9 rebounds, 5.4 assists and 1.2 steals in 28.9 minutes per game.
After two seasons in Chicago, Satoransky was shipped to New Orleans over the summer as part of the Lonzo Ball sign-and-trade. He'll join Devonte' Graham, Nickeil Alexander-Walker, Garrett Temple and Kira Lewis in a crowded Pelicans' backcourt that may be difficult to get a read on. Realistically, all five players could compete for a starting spot under new head coach Willie Green, though Satoransky's ability to play both guard positions is a notch in his favor. Regardless of whether he starts or comes off the bench, if Satoransky can lock in 25-plus minutes per night, he could return low-end value in standard leagues. Two seasons ago, Satoransky finished inside the top 110 in eight-category leagues behind 9.9 points, 3.9 rebounds, 5.4 assists and 1.2 steals in 28.9 minutes per game.
MIN (F)
G
73
Min
26.5
FPTS
834.0
REB
310.0
AST
113.0
STL
61.0
BLK
90.0
TO
63.0
FGM
277.0
FGA
617.0
FTM
56.0
FTA
85.0
McDaniels, a former top-10 high school recruit, was drafted 28th overall last season. Surprisingly, he saw a significant role with the Timberwolves. His minutes and production started increasing nicely in March, and through his final 33 games, McDaniels averaged 8.3 points on 49/38/68 shooting, 4.0 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.7 combined blocks-plus-steals. Over that stretch, he ranked 124th in terms of total production due to a clean bill of health. Despite the relative success, McDaniels opted to play in 2021 Summer League, where he averaged 16.3 points on 49/28/100 shooting, 6.5 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 2.3 combined steals-plus-blocks. McDaniels clearly has upside given his status as a recruit, and he did a good job of showing off his defensive upside as a rookie. If he can remain a consistent three-point shooter and take some steps in terms of creating his own looks, he could be a deep-league sleeper. That will probably also count on him seeing roughly 30 minutes per game, but the starting power forward job is seemingly an open competition for the Wolves between McDaniels, Jarred Vanderbilt and Taurean Prince.
McDaniels, a former top-10 high school recruit, was drafted 28th overall last season. Surprisingly, he saw a significant role with the Timberwolves. His minutes and production started increasing nicely in March, and through his final 33 games, McDaniels averaged 8.3 points on 49/38/68 shooting, 4.0 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.7 combined blocks-plus-steals. Over that stretch, he ranked 124th in terms of total production due to a clean bill of health. Despite the relative success, McDaniels opted to play in 2021 Summer League, where he averaged 16.3 points on 49/28/100 shooting, 6.5 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 2.3 combined steals-plus-blocks. McDaniels clearly has upside given his status as a recruit, and he did a good job of showing off his defensive upside as a rookie. If he can remain a consistent three-point shooter and take some steps in terms of creating his own looks, he could be a deep-league sleeper. That will probably also count on him seeing roughly 30 minutes per game, but the starting power forward job is seemingly an open competition for the Wolves between McDaniels, Jarred Vanderbilt and Taurean Prince.
MEM (G)
G
70
Min
21.8
FPTS
832.0
REB
287.0
AST
229.0
STL
101.0
BLK
26.0
TO
110.0
FGM
224.0
FGA
524.0
FTM
122.0
FTA
158.0
Melton has developed somewhat of a cult following from fantasy die-hards as one of the best per-minute fantasy producers in the NBA. Last season, he was 32nd in per-minute production after ranking 48th in 2019-20. The problem is that he's stuck behind Ja Morant. Last year, Melton received 20.1 minutes per game and averaged 9.1 points, 3.1 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.8 combined steals-plus-blocks. He also made 1.7 threes per game at 41.2 percent. Unfortunately for Melton optimists, the Grizzlies' backcourt situation hasn't changed. Morant is still the starter, and Dillon Brooks is practically locked into 30-plus minutes a night as the shooting guard. There's room for Melton to see action as a reserve at both guard spots, but he'll also still be competing against Tyus Jones, Desmond Bane and new additions Rajon Rondo and Ziaire Williams. Fantasy managers in dynasty/keeper formats with Melton should hold strong in hopes that he eventually finds his way into a more advantageous situation. Managers in standard redraft leagues can ignore Melton. If you're in a deep league, there's clearly upside here, making Melton potentially worth a late-round pick, but it would take injuries or a trade for him to reach that potential.
Melton has developed somewhat of a cult following from fantasy die-hards as one of the best per-minute fantasy producers in the NBA. Last season, he was 32nd in per-minute production after ranking 48th in 2019-20. The problem is that he's stuck behind Ja Morant. Last year, Melton received 20.1 minutes per game and averaged 9.1 points, 3.1 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.8 combined steals-plus-blocks. He also made 1.7 threes per game at 41.2 percent. Unfortunately for Melton optimists, the Grizzlies' backcourt situation hasn't changed. Morant is still the starter, and Dillon Brooks is practically locked into 30-plus minutes a night as the shooting guard. There's room for Melton to see action as a reserve at both guard spots, but he'll also still be competing against Tyus Jones, Desmond Bane and new additions Rajon Rondo and Ziaire Williams. Fantasy managers in dynasty/keeper formats with Melton should hold strong in hopes that he eventually finds his way into a more advantageous situation. Managers in standard redraft leagues can ignore Melton. If you're in a deep league, there's clearly upside here, making Melton potentially worth a late-round pick, but it would take injuries or a trade for him to reach that potential.
UTA (C)
G
64
Min
15.4
FPTS
827.0
REB
445.0
AST
38.0
STL
13.0
BLK
96.0
TO
59.0
FGM
203.0
FGA
345.0
FTM
73.0
FTA
117.0
Injuries, COVID-19 protocols and falling out of favor with coach Luke Walton limited Whiteside to just 36 games last season with the Kings. The big center played a backup role and averaged 8.1 points, 6.0 rebounds and 1.3 blocks in 15.2 minutes per game. Those numbers are gaudy given his workload, and there remains no question that Whiteside is one of the best per-minute fantasy producers in the NBA. However, his stats haven't had a history of leading to wins or great team chemistry, hence his frequent team changes. That's the case again for this upcoming season, as Whiteside will change teams and serve as Utah's backup center to Rudy Gobert. The Jazz don't really have another option for reserve center minutes besides Eric Paschall, who is much more of a power forward, and Udoka Azubuike, who showed flashes in Summer League but is still a project. With that being the case, Whiteside should again be in line for roughly 15 minutes per night. He can still crack the top 200 in that limited run, so he has to at least be considered in deep leagues. Plus, if Gobert suffers any sort of significant injury, Whiteside could put up great stats. In a best ball format, it makes sense to draft Whiteside late if you snag Gobert early.
Injuries, COVID-19 protocols and falling out of favor with coach Luke Walton limited Whiteside to just 36 games last season with the Kings. The big center played a backup role and averaged 8.1 points, 6.0 rebounds and 1.3 blocks in 15.2 minutes per game. Those numbers are gaudy given his workload, and there remains no question that Whiteside is one of the best per-minute fantasy producers in the NBA. However, his stats haven't had a history of leading to wins or great team chemistry, hence his frequent team changes. That's the case again for this upcoming season, as Whiteside will change teams and serve as Utah's backup center to Rudy Gobert. The Jazz don't really have another option for reserve center minutes besides Eric Paschall, who is much more of a power forward, and Udoka Azubuike, who showed flashes in Summer League but is still a project. With that being the case, Whiteside should again be in line for roughly 15 minutes per night. He can still crack the top 200 in that limited run, so he has to at least be considered in deep leagues. Plus, if Gobert suffers any sort of significant injury, Whiteside could put up great stats. In a best ball format, it makes sense to draft Whiteside late if you snag Gobert early.
PHO (F)
G
74
Min
25.6
FPTS
823.0
REB
282.0
AST
104.0
STL
62.0
BLK
30.0
TO
48.0
FGM
262.0
FGA
611.0
FTM
76.0
FTA
86.0
In his second season, Johnson took small steps forward statistically, increasing his points per game from 8.8 to 9.6, threes from 1.9 to 2.0, and assists from 1.2 to 1.4. However, the growth was marginal -- not exactly what you'd hope for from an 11th pick, second-year player. A couple of bright spots emerged in the playoffs, however, where Johnson was consistently the first forward off the bench (enabled by Dario Saric's injury). Johnson increased his steals per game to 0.9 versus 0.6 in the regular season, and he hit the coveted 50-40-90 mark. No doubt, Johnson is an exciting player to watch, with his smooth three-point shooting ability and athletic moves around the basket. With Saric still injured, Johnson will be given plenty of opportunities in 2021-22 to show off his skills. But if he's going to emerge as more than a backup role player, he's going to need to consistently do more with the 24-27 minutes he gets.
In his second season, Johnson took small steps forward statistically, increasing his points per game from 8.8 to 9.6, threes from 1.9 to 2.0, and assists from 1.2 to 1.4. However, the growth was marginal -- not exactly what you'd hope for from an 11th pick, second-year player. A couple of bright spots emerged in the playoffs, however, where Johnson was consistently the first forward off the bench (enabled by Dario Saric's injury). Johnson increased his steals per game to 0.9 versus 0.6 in the regular season, and he hit the coveted 50-40-90 mark. No doubt, Johnson is an exciting player to watch, with his smooth three-point shooting ability and athletic moves around the basket. With Saric still injured, Johnson will be given plenty of opportunities in 2021-22 to show off his skills. But if he's going to emerge as more than a backup role player, he's going to need to consistently do more with the 24-27 minutes he gets.
PHI (G)
G
72
Min
24.1
FPTS
822.0
REB
189.0
AST
224.0
STL
52.0
BLK
27.0
TO
101.0
FGM
250.0
FGA
545.0
FTM
172.0
FTA
210.0
Milton again played a light sixth-man role for the 76ers last year, though his workload fluctuated significantly throughout the season. The reserve guard appeared in 64 games and averaged 13.0 points, 3.1 assists and 2.3 rebounds in 23.2 minutes, though both his field-goal percentage (45.0) and three-point percentage (35.0) took dips compared to 2019-20. Ultimately, he ranked 212th in per-game fantasy value. As the team stands heading into training camp, Milton appears to be in line for the same role. However, with the continuous rumors of Ben Simmons and the Sixers hoping to part ways, there's always a chance for Milton to receive increased minutes. At the same time, the Sixers would likely be trading for another point guard, so Milton's chances of starting are probably slim. Aggressive fantasy managers in deep formats can take a chance on the 25-year-old with a final pick, but the payoff will heavily depend on how the Simmons situation gets resolved.
Milton again played a light sixth-man role for the 76ers last year, though his workload fluctuated significantly throughout the season. The reserve guard appeared in 64 games and averaged 13.0 points, 3.1 assists and 2.3 rebounds in 23.2 minutes, though both his field-goal percentage (45.0) and three-point percentage (35.0) took dips compared to 2019-20. Ultimately, he ranked 212th in per-game fantasy value. As the team stands heading into training camp, Milton appears to be in line for the same role. However, with the continuous rumors of Ben Simmons and the Sixers hoping to part ways, there's always a chance for Milton to receive increased minutes. At the same time, the Sixers would likely be trading for another point guard, so Milton's chances of starting are probably slim. Aggressive fantasy managers in deep formats can take a chance on the 25-year-old with a final pick, but the payoff will heavily depend on how the Simmons situation gets resolved.
GS (F)
G
69
Min
21.3
FPTS
815.0
REB
335.0
AST
148.0
STL
45.0
BLK
29.0
TO
72.0
FGM
225.0
FGA
477.0
FTM
49.0
FTA
61.0
Bjelica had the smallest role of his career last season. He appeared in just 37 games due to a combination of injury and DNP-Coach's Decisions between both the Kings and the Heat. He ranked an abysmal 348th in per-game fantasy production behind averages of 6.5 points, 3.4 rebounds and 1.9 assists. Heading into the 2021-22 season, the 33-year-old will be on his third new team in two seasons, joining the Warriors. He figures to be in the mix for reserve frontcourt minutes, but Golden State isn't short on depth after making some other additions. Bjelica will be competing for minutes with rookies Jonathan Kuminga and Moses Moody, plus Otto Porter, Andre Iguodala, Juan Toscano-Anderson and even Kevon Looney. Bjelica may not end up being an every-game player for the Warriors. He should only be drafted in very deep fantasy leagues.
Bjelica had the smallest role of his career last season. He appeared in just 37 games due to a combination of injury and DNP-Coach's Decisions between both the Kings and the Heat. He ranked an abysmal 348th in per-game fantasy production behind averages of 6.5 points, 3.4 rebounds and 1.9 assists. Heading into the 2021-22 season, the 33-year-old will be on his third new team in two seasons, joining the Warriors. He figures to be in the mix for reserve frontcourt minutes, but Golden State isn't short on depth after making some other additions. Bjelica will be competing for minutes with rookies Jonathan Kuminga and Moses Moody, plus Otto Porter, Andre Iguodala, Juan Toscano-Anderson and even Kevon Looney. Bjelica may not end up being an every-game player for the Warriors. He should only be drafted in very deep fantasy leagues.
DET (G)
G
70
Min
30.3
FPTS
812.0
REB
208.0
AST
345.0
STL
86.0
BLK
15.0
TO
230.0
FGM
350.0
FGA
835.0
FTM
116.0
FTA
139.0
During his first season in the NBA, Hayes appeared in 26 contests and posted 6.8 points, 5.3 assists, 2.7 rebounds and 1.0 steals across 25.8 minutes per game. The rookie played 30-plus minutes eight times and averaged 12.4 points, 5.9 assists and 3.3 rebounds during those contests. In his second season, Hayes will be the de facto starting point guard and should garner a bigger workload if he can build upon his promising rookie season. He will likely share the majority of the playmaking duties with No. 1 overall pick Cade Cunningham. Detroit elected to re-sign veteran Cory Joseph and 22-year-old Saben Lee to multi-year contracts this offseason, but they won't threaten Hayes' potential unless he starts to regress. While Hayes has displayed promising traits, the biggest cause for concern has been his scoring ability in the NBA. Operating as one of Detroit's go-to players last year, the 6-foot-5 guard attempted 7.7 shots per game -- 2.8 of which were threes -- and only shot 35.3 percent from the field and 27.8 percent from distance. If he can become a reliable scorer, his potential is through the roof. Hayes is worth a flier, but expectations should be tempered until he becomes a more efficient scorer at the NBA level.
During his first season in the NBA, Hayes appeared in 26 contests and posted 6.8 points, 5.3 assists, 2.7 rebounds and 1.0 steals across 25.8 minutes per game. The rookie played 30-plus minutes eight times and averaged 12.4 points, 5.9 assists and 3.3 rebounds during those contests. In his second season, Hayes will be the de facto starting point guard and should garner a bigger workload if he can build upon his promising rookie season. He will likely share the majority of the playmaking duties with No. 1 overall pick Cade Cunningham. Detroit elected to re-sign veteran Cory Joseph and 22-year-old Saben Lee to multi-year contracts this offseason, but they won't threaten Hayes' potential unless he starts to regress. While Hayes has displayed promising traits, the biggest cause for concern has been his scoring ability in the NBA. Operating as one of Detroit's go-to players last year, the 6-foot-5 guard attempted 7.7 shots per game -- 2.8 of which were threes -- and only shot 35.3 percent from the field and 27.8 percent from distance. If he can become a reliable scorer, his potential is through the roof. Hayes is worth a flier, but expectations should be tempered until he becomes a more efficient scorer at the NBA level.
UTA (F)
G
72
Min
24.8
FPTS
807.0
REB
233.0
AST
312.0
STL
54.0
BLK
9.0
TO
119.0
FGM
206.0
FGA
462.0
FTM
61.0
FTA
79.0
After a down year scoring in 2019-20, Ingles bounced back up to double-digits last season. The veteran averaged 12.1 points, 4.7 assists and 3.6 rebounds in 27.9 minutes per contest. He also continued his excellent shooting with splits of 49/45/84. That allowed him to rank 103rd in per-game fantasy production -- better than 2019-20 but significantly worse than his peak of 62nd in 2017-18. He's settled nicely into a sixth-man role, and Ingles' diverse offensive skillset allows him to play multiple positions, including point guard when needed. That also means he's often the first player to see increased usage when a teammate is injured. The yo-yoing role can sometimes mean inconsistent fantasy production, however, and he's often not worthy of a starting spot on a standard fantasy team when he's coming off the bench. That dynamic shouldn't change in 2021-22, as the Jazz made no significant changes in the offseason. As a result, Ingles can continue to be drafted outside pick 100, though with his ceiling relying significantly on other players getting injured, he's more suited for deep leagues.
After a down year scoring in 2019-20, Ingles bounced back up to double-digits last season. The veteran averaged 12.1 points, 4.7 assists and 3.6 rebounds in 27.9 minutes per contest. He also continued his excellent shooting with splits of 49/45/84. That allowed him to rank 103rd in per-game fantasy production -- better than 2019-20 but significantly worse than his peak of 62nd in 2017-18. He's settled nicely into a sixth-man role, and Ingles' diverse offensive skillset allows him to play multiple positions, including point guard when needed. That also means he's often the first player to see increased usage when a teammate is injured. The yo-yoing role can sometimes mean inconsistent fantasy production, however, and he's often not worthy of a starting spot on a standard fantasy team when he's coming off the bench. That dynamic shouldn't change in 2021-22, as the Jazz made no significant changes in the offseason. As a result, Ingles can continue to be drafted outside pick 100, though with his ceiling relying significantly on other players getting injured, he's more suited for deep leagues.
LAC (C)
G
62
Min
23.8
FPTS
807.0
REB
405.0
AST
57.0
STL
28.0
BLK
60.0
TO
108.0
FGM
247.0
FGA
489.0
FTM
73.0
FTA
94.0
Ibaka was having a nice run as the Clippers' starting center before a serious back injury derailed his season, and he ended up playing just 41 games. He saw 23.3 minutes per game, essentially splitting time with Ivica Zubac, and averaged 11.1 points, 6.7 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.1 blocks. While it was the second-worst fantasy season of Ibaka's career on a per-game basis (ranked 133rd), his presence as a floor spacer helped create driving lanes for the Clippers' primary scorers, Paul George and Kawhi Leonard. The 32-year-old should be ready for the start of training camp, and it's fair to expect him again to split time with Ivica Zubac. With Leonard (knee) out for much, if not all, of the 2021-22 season, it's possible some more usage is funneled to Ibaka, or that he plays more power forward. He's hovered around ranks 70-90 in recent years when given 25-plus minutes, so that should be viewed as his upside. That said, there's probably little reason to draft him there, as he's not exactly bursting with upside at his advanced age. Ibaka is best suited as a late-round target for managers in deep leagues who need big man depth.
Ibaka was having a nice run as the Clippers' starting center before a serious back injury derailed his season, and he ended up playing just 41 games. He saw 23.3 minutes per game, essentially splitting time with Ivica Zubac, and averaged 11.1 points, 6.7 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.1 blocks. While it was the second-worst fantasy season of Ibaka's career on a per-game basis (ranked 133rd), his presence as a floor spacer helped create driving lanes for the Clippers' primary scorers, Paul George and Kawhi Leonard. The 32-year-old should be ready for the start of training camp, and it's fair to expect him again to split time with Ivica Zubac. With Leonard (knee) out for much, if not all, of the 2021-22 season, it's possible some more usage is funneled to Ibaka, or that he plays more power forward. He's hovered around ranks 70-90 in recent years when given 25-plus minutes, so that should be viewed as his upside. That said, there's probably little reason to draft him there, as he's not exactly bursting with upside at his advanced age. Ibaka is best suited as a late-round target for managers in deep leagues who need big man depth.
ORL (F)
G
72
Min
22.1
FPTS
799.0
REB
334.0
AST
154.0
STL
53.0
BLK
54.0
TO
84.0
FGM
197.0
FGA
439.0
FTM
92.0
FTA
113.0
One of the more unique players in the class, Wagner's length and intangibles are the primary traits that made him a top-10 pick. Wagner averaged a well-rounded 12.5 points, 6.5 rebounds, 3.0 assists, 1.3 steals and 1.0 block as a sophomore at Michigan last season. He's far from a traditional playmaker, but Wagner's passing is well-above-average for his age and size. He also profiles as a potentially elite defender capable of shadowing opposing big men and sticking with guards at the rim. Wagner will have more competition for playing time than fellow-rookie Jalen Suggs - including from his older brother, Moritz - but if the minutes are there, he could be one of the most well-rounded rookies in the class. Still, Wagner is probably a year away from warranting draft consideration in standard formats.
One of the more unique players in the class, Wagner's length and intangibles are the primary traits that made him a top-10 pick. Wagner averaged a well-rounded 12.5 points, 6.5 rebounds, 3.0 assists, 1.3 steals and 1.0 block as a sophomore at Michigan last season. He's far from a traditional playmaker, but Wagner's passing is well-above-average for his age and size. He also profiles as a potentially elite defender capable of shadowing opposing big men and sticking with guards at the rim. Wagner will have more competition for playing time than fellow-rookie Jalen Suggs - including from his older brother, Moritz - but if the minutes are there, he could be one of the most well-rounded rookies in the class. Still, Wagner is probably a year away from warranting draft consideration in standard formats.
SAN (F)
G
73
Min
26.2
FPTS
799.0
REB
249.0
AST
111.0
STL
79.0
BLK
39.0
TO
43.0
FGM
274.0
FGA
639.0
FTM
102.0
FTA
119.0
The 11th overall pick in the 2020 Draft, Vassell had an up-and-down rookie campaign with the Spurs. Overall, he appeared in 62 games (seven starts) and averaged 5.5 points and 2.8 rebounds. He's primarily a shooter, with 52 percent of his shots coming from three and just 16 percent of his looks coming at the rim. However, he didn't exactly excel from an efficiency standpoint, as he shot just 40.6 percent from the field and 34.7 percent from distance. He showed some upside on defense, averaging a combined 2.1 steals-plus-blocks per 36 minutes, but those aren't gaudy numbers. Vassell should have more opportunities this season with the Spurs appearing to be in a rebuild. While Doug McDermott will likely start at small forward, Vassell figures to be the primary backup, and he could see some action at shooting guard behind Derrick White. However, Vassell can probably be avoided in most drafts since it's possible, if not likely, that he sees minutes in the low-20s.
The 11th overall pick in the 2020 Draft, Vassell had an up-and-down rookie campaign with the Spurs. Overall, he appeared in 62 games (seven starts) and averaged 5.5 points and 2.8 rebounds. He's primarily a shooter, with 52 percent of his shots coming from three and just 16 percent of his looks coming at the rim. However, he didn't exactly excel from an efficiency standpoint, as he shot just 40.6 percent from the field and 34.7 percent from distance. He showed some upside on defense, averaging a combined 2.1 steals-plus-blocks per 36 minutes, but those aren't gaudy numbers. Vassell should have more opportunities this season with the Spurs appearing to be in a rebuild. While Doug McDermott will likely start at small forward, Vassell figures to be the primary backup, and he could see some action at shooting guard behind Derrick White. However, Vassell can probably be avoided in most drafts since it's possible, if not likely, that he sees minutes in the low-20s.
NY (F)
G
78
Min
18.6
FPTS
794.0
REB
290.0
AST
70.0
STL
34.0
BLK
43.0
TO
61.0
FGM
274.0
FGA
529.0
FTM
112.0
FTA
148.0
The No. 8 overall pick in 2020, Toppin had a disappointing rookie season. While the Knicks exceeded expectations, Toppin failed to meet them while being stuck behind Julius Randle, who led the NBA in minutes and finished eighth in MVP voting. In his 11.0 minutes per game, Toppin averaged 4.1 points and 2.2 rebounds with shooting splits of 50/31/73. It will again be tough for Toppin to find meaningful minutes. Randle is still around, and the Knicks maintained depth in the frontcourt while adding depth on the wing with Evan Fournier. It's certainly possible Toppin sees closer to 20 minutes per game rather than 10 minutes, but it still seems unlikely he'll be able to make an impact in fantasy. Encouragingly, he was great in Summer League, where he played six games and averaged 21.0 points on 45/34/89 shooting, 8.3 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.3 steals in 35.1 minutes.
The No. 8 overall pick in 2020, Toppin had a disappointing rookie season. While the Knicks exceeded expectations, Toppin failed to meet them while being stuck behind Julius Randle, who led the NBA in minutes and finished eighth in MVP voting. In his 11.0 minutes per game, Toppin averaged 4.1 points and 2.2 rebounds with shooting splits of 50/31/73. It will again be tough for Toppin to find meaningful minutes. Randle is still around, and the Knicks maintained depth in the frontcourt while adding depth on the wing with Evan Fournier. It's certainly possible Toppin sees closer to 20 minutes per game rather than 10 minutes, but it still seems unlikely he'll be able to make an impact in fantasy. Encouragingly, he was great in Summer League, where he played six games and averaged 21.0 points on 45/34/89 shooting, 8.3 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.3 steals in 35.1 minutes.
SAC (C)
G
68
Min
19.1
FPTS
793.0
REB
462.0
AST
91.0
STL
25.0
BLK
38.0
TO
78.0
FGM
212.0
FGA
407.0
FTM
74.0
FTA
122.0
After one year with the Celtics, Thompson was dealt via a three-team deal that landed the veteran center in Sacramento. Originally acquired as insurance should the Kings lose Richaun Holmes in free agency, Thompson will now back up Holmes, who subsequently agreed to a new four-year deal with Sacramento. That investment in Holmes means Thompson, who is on the last year of his contract, will certainly be the lower priority. The Kings also brought back veteran center Alex Len, so significant minutes at the five could be hard to come by for the 30-year Thompson. Last year, Boston brought Thompson in to provide a defensive presence against Joel Embiid and other Eastern centers. Unfortunately, Thompson failed in that role and the Celtics were happy to rid themselves of his contract. That doesn't bode well for Thompson in 2021-22, and he might struggle to match last year's 23.8 minutes per game. Long gone are the days when Thompson could bank on starts with a talent-challenged Cavs squad. Look for the 2011 No. 4 overall pick to put up frequent double-singles with low blocks and poor free-throw shooting.
After one year with the Celtics, Thompson was dealt via a three-team deal that landed the veteran center in Sacramento. Originally acquired as insurance should the Kings lose Richaun Holmes in free agency, Thompson will now back up Holmes, who subsequently agreed to a new four-year deal with Sacramento. That investment in Holmes means Thompson, who is on the last year of his contract, will certainly be the lower priority. The Kings also brought back veteran center Alex Len, so significant minutes at the five could be hard to come by for the 30-year Thompson. Last year, Boston brought Thompson in to provide a defensive presence against Joel Embiid and other Eastern centers. Unfortunately, Thompson failed in that role and the Celtics were happy to rid themselves of his contract. That doesn't bode well for Thompson in 2021-22, and he might struggle to match last year's 23.8 minutes per game. Long gone are the days when Thompson could bank on starts with a talent-challenged Cavs squad. Look for the 2011 No. 4 overall pick to put up frequent double-singles with low blocks and poor free-throw shooting.
SAN (G)
G
71
Min
25.9
FPTS
788.0
REB
259.0
AST
127.0
STL
60.0
BLK
26.0
TO
82.0
FGM
328.0
FGA
756.0
FTM
88.0
FTA
114.0
With Derrick White out for the start last year, Walker was thrust into a starting role with the Spurs to begin the season. After seeing just 16.2 minutes per game in the previous year, the high-flying guard saw his workload jump up to 25.4 minutes last season. Walker played decent in his new role, posting figures of 11.2 points, 2.6 rebounds and 1.7 assists per game last year. This was the most aggressive version of Walker we'd seen yet, as his 10.2 field goal attempts per game were nearly double his average from the previous season. However, in games where Derrick White was back starting, Walker saw his role drop down to 20.5 minutes per game. Entering this season, the Spurs are shaping up to be a much different team due to the departure of DeMar DeRozan. Dejounte Murray and Derrick White are looking healthy and ready to be the starters in the backcourt, which leaves Walker fighting for minutes as a reserve. The Miami product is a part of a fairly deep backcourt with the emerging second-year-pro Devin Vassell as well as the return of Bryn Forbes to San Antonio. For now, it seems like Walker has the backup shooting guard spot on lock, but with a healthy team entering this season, it will be interesting to see how the 22-year-old's minutes will be affected. Walker has proved to be a capable scorer when given the minutes, as his scoring average jumped to 17.9 points per game when he saw 30-39 minutes last year. However, the question is if that type of playing time will be available to him this year. Walker has improved each season he has been in the league, and it won't be surprising to see him continue that trend, but with a more crowded and healthy backcourt, it is tough to imagine a true breakout fantasy season as he enters his fourth season.
With Derrick White out for the start last year, Walker was thrust into a starting role with the Spurs to begin the season. After seeing just 16.2 minutes per game in the previous year, the high-flying guard saw his workload jump up to 25.4 minutes last season. Walker played decent in his new role, posting figures of 11.2 points, 2.6 rebounds and 1.7 assists per game last year. This was the most aggressive version of Walker we'd seen yet, as his 10.2 field goal attempts per game were nearly double his average from the previous season. However, in games where Derrick White was back starting, Walker saw his role drop down to 20.5 minutes per game. Entering this season, the Spurs are shaping up to be a much different team due to the departure of DeMar DeRozan. Dejounte Murray and Derrick White are looking healthy and ready to be the starters in the backcourt, which leaves Walker fighting for minutes as a reserve. The Miami product is a part of a fairly deep backcourt with the emerging second-year-pro Devin Vassell as well as the return of Bryn Forbes to San Antonio. For now, it seems like Walker has the backup shooting guard spot on lock, but with a healthy team entering this season, it will be interesting to see how the 22-year-old's minutes will be affected. Walker has proved to be a capable scorer when given the minutes, as his scoring average jumped to 17.9 points per game when he saw 30-39 minutes last year. However, the question is if that type of playing time will be available to him this year. Walker has improved each season he has been in the league, and it won't be surprising to see him continue that trend, but with a more crowded and healthy backcourt, it is tough to imagine a true breakout fantasy season as he enters his fourth season.
ORL (F)
G
53
Min
27.0
FPTS
787.0
REB
300.0
AST
95.0
STL
66.0
BLK
78.0
TO
60.0
FGM
206.0
FGA
433.0
FTM
102.0
FTA
130.0
Isaac missed all of last season while recovering from a torn ACL and meniscus. The Magic have changed significantly since Isaac last played, with the organization diving into a rebuild. That will likely end up being a positive thing for Isaac, who figures to be more of a focal point of the offense than he would have been previously. Despite playing just 136 career games since being drafted sixth overall in 2017, Isaac has already established himself as one of the league's best defenders, averaging 2.1 blocks and 1.5 steals per 36 minutes for his career. The question now is about the other side of the ball. Isaac made strides in 2019-20, as he averaged 11.9 points on 47/34/79 shooting -- the most efficient season of his career. He also averaged 6.8 rebounds and 1.4 assists in 28.8 minutes. The result, combined with his 2.9 combined blocks-plus-steals, was Isaac ranking a shocking 34th in per-game fantasy production in his 34 appearances. In 2021-22, Isaac figures to see 30-plus minutes on a regular basis, and it won't be surprising if he sets a career high in shot attempts. The injury risk should concern fantasy managers, but Isaac could be a steal after the fourth or fifth round given his two-way upside.
Isaac missed all of last season while recovering from a torn ACL and meniscus. The Magic have changed significantly since Isaac last played, with the organization diving into a rebuild. That will likely end up being a positive thing for Isaac, who figures to be more of a focal point of the offense than he would have been previously. Despite playing just 136 career games since being drafted sixth overall in 2017, Isaac has already established himself as one of the league's best defenders, averaging 2.1 blocks and 1.5 steals per 36 minutes for his career. The question now is about the other side of the ball. Isaac made strides in 2019-20, as he averaged 11.9 points on 47/34/79 shooting -- the most efficient season of his career. He also averaged 6.8 rebounds and 1.4 assists in 28.8 minutes. The result, combined with his 2.9 combined blocks-plus-steals, was Isaac ranking a shocking 34th in per-game fantasy production in his 34 appearances. In 2021-22, Isaac figures to see 30-plus minutes on a regular basis, and it won't be surprising if he sets a career high in shot attempts. The injury risk should concern fantasy managers, but Isaac could be a steal after the fourth or fifth round given his two-way upside.
BOS (C)
G
65
Min
15.2
FPTS
787.0
REB
433.0
AST
56.0
STL
22.0
BLK
41.0
TO
56.0
FGM
200.0
FGA
350.0
FTM
70.0
FTA
100.0
PHO (G)
G
71
Min
18.8
FPTS
776.0
REB
226.0
AST
175.0
STL
58.0
BLK
15.0
TO
80.0
FGM
266.0
FGA
553.0
FTM
56.0
FTA
64.0
After five years of limited NBA action, as well as stints in China and the G League, Payne seems to have finally found a home in Phoenix. Following strong bubble play in 2020, Payne's contract was picked up for a second season, and he saw consistent play as the first guard off the bench (18.0 minutes per game, 48.4 FG%, 89.3 FT%, 3.6 assists, 8.4 points). During the offseason, he was rewarded for his production with a three-year $19 million contract. This season, Payne will continue to be called on to back up Chris Paul at point guard, but he can also play alongside Paul, as he did for stints during the playoffs. With Payne's role as backup point guard and offensive spark off the bench solidified, expect him to log solid sixth-man minutes. Payne actually has a close relationship with Monty Williams (who was associate head coach in 2015 when Payne was on the Thunder) and if Williams can squeeze even more out of the electric guard, fantasy owners who take a flier on Payne with a late-round pick may be rewarded with production even higher than last year.
After five years of limited NBA action, as well as stints in China and the G League, Payne seems to have finally found a home in Phoenix. Following strong bubble play in 2020, Payne's contract was picked up for a second season, and he saw consistent play as the first guard off the bench (18.0 minutes per game, 48.4 FG%, 89.3 FT%, 3.6 assists, 8.4 points). During the offseason, he was rewarded for his production with a three-year $19 million contract. This season, Payne will continue to be called on to back up Chris Paul at point guard, but he can also play alongside Paul, as he did for stints during the playoffs. With Payne's role as backup point guard and offensive spark off the bench solidified, expect him to log solid sixth-man minutes. Payne actually has a close relationship with Monty Williams (who was associate head coach in 2015 when Payne was on the Thunder) and if Williams can squeeze even more out of the electric guard, fantasy owners who take a flier on Payne with a late-round pick may be rewarded with production even higher than last year.
MEM (G)
G
75
Min
24.3
FPTS
775.0
REB
237.0
AST
122.0
STL
46.0
BLK
22.0
TO
97.0
FGM
293.0
FGA
629.0
FTM
62.0
FTA
75.0
Bane appeared in 68 of 72 regular-season games in his first season in the NBA. The rookie out of TCU displayed an efficient shot by connecting on 46.9 percent from the field and 43.2 percent from downtown en route to 9.2 points per game. He posted double-digit points in 32 contests and 20-plus points on three occasions. However, Bane averaged just 3.1 rebounds, 1.7 assists, 0.6 steals and 0.2 blocks per game and finished outside the top 150 of overall fantasy scorers. The 6-foot-5 wing displayed promise of being a great defender as he registered multiple steals in nine games, but he failed to consistently put up those numbers. He will look to build off of his strong rookie season in Year 2, but he will have to compete with 2021 No. 10 overall pick Ziaire Williams and recently-acquired Jarrett Culver for playing time. Bane will likely garner a similar role for Memphis next season, unless Williams or Culver exceeds expectations.
Bane appeared in 68 of 72 regular-season games in his first season in the NBA. The rookie out of TCU displayed an efficient shot by connecting on 46.9 percent from the field and 43.2 percent from downtown en route to 9.2 points per game. He posted double-digit points in 32 contests and 20-plus points on three occasions. However, Bane averaged just 3.1 rebounds, 1.7 assists, 0.6 steals and 0.2 blocks per game and finished outside the top 150 of overall fantasy scorers. The 6-foot-5 wing displayed promise of being a great defender as he registered multiple steals in nine games, but he failed to consistently put up those numbers. He will look to build off of his strong rookie season in Year 2, but he will have to compete with 2021 No. 10 overall pick Ziaire Williams and recently-acquired Jarrett Culver for playing time. Bane will likely garner a similar role for Memphis next season, unless Williams or Culver exceeds expectations.
ORL (G)
G
50
Min
28.0
FPTS
771.0
REB
195.0
AST
259.0
STL
91.0
BLK
16.0
TO
103.0
FGM
264.0
FGA